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Author Topic: Yet an other second element question  (Read 343 times)

Offline Toker

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Yet an other second element question
« on: January 03, 2018, 12:27:55 am »
Hi, I would have a question about the second 500 watts element mod please. Could someone explain me how to plug it in the back of the smoker. I’m adding a second sensor ( the round thing in the back wall where the fuse is attached to it for my obs.

I will have two wires each side of the smoker that I need to plug into the back. One coming out directly from the element and one hooked to the sensor. Witch one go together? Are both wires hooked to the sensor going together on the same spade connector and the two others together or the opposite or it doesn’t matter? Could someone post me a picture or a draw to helping me to under up lease. I would greatly appreciated Thanks.

Offline TedEbear

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2018, 09:55:21 am »
You're making this way too complicated.  When I added a second 500W element all I did was make two 3-4" loops of high temp wire and attached each end of the second element to each end of the original element with uninsulated ring terminals.  I've been running it that way for many years.

I also have a PID controller, which is highly recommended if you increase the wattage from the original factory configuration.


Offline Toker

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2018, 10:26:24 am »
It’s because many years ago, someone advanced me to do so for security because I’m in wheelchair and I smoke inside. Btw, I have two pid, one dual probe and the new WiFi triple probe.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2018, 10:51:57 am by Toker »

Offline gricardsimplycol

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2018, 11:58:36 am »
It’s because many years ago, someone advanced me to do so for security because I’m in wheelchair and I smoke inside. Btw, I have two pid, one dual probe and the new WiFi triple probe.
Toker on a smoker site that's funny

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Offline Toker

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2018, 12:05:10 pm »
Nice to meet you :)


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Offline TedEbear

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2018, 03:18:46 pm »
Toker, here's how to add a second element with an ON/OFF switch. 


Additional Heating Element for OBS with On/Off Control
From Habanero Smoker


DISCLAIMER This article is for my own personal interest only. It is a step by step of how I modified my Bradley. Should you decide to make this modification you acknowledge all risks are solely yours. Again, if you decide to make this modification you do so at your own risk. My thoughts on the "risk" of higher temps are... the only part of the tower that will be exposed to higher heat will be the rear of the cabinet directly behind the elements. In addition the only time it will be exposed to higher heat is when you are trying to bring the cabinet back up to temp after loading. Once the set temp has been achieved the cabinet really isn't exposed to any higher heat than with a single element.

Also if one does not have a temperature control devise, such as a PID, DigiQ II etc., you should not add the second element.

Please read the disclaimer at the top of this post, I did this modification for my own personal use. Following up on Mike’s creative solution to add additional heat I decided to modify my OBS, and add a switch to give me the option of having the second element either on or off. I left the original element connected to the Bradley temperature control, both work independently of each other. This post mainly goes into detail on how to install the switch on an Original Bradley Smoker (OBS) the non-digital models, though it does describe the wiring for the OBS. For detail instructions on how to install the second element follow the instructions in Additional Heating Element Modification.


I often get questioned on why I added a switch for the second element. It is optional, and if you don't have any need for the switch, then skip those instructions. My reason for the switch was to allow me to operate the Bradley as it was originally designed. That way I do not have to hook up my temperature control device when I don't need it. At least one person found it came in handy when his PID failed, and it was important for him to still smoke/cook that weekend. A simple toggle of the switch enabled him to use his smoker without the PID. Here is how I installed the second element and the switch. 

Materials: (List includes additional materials and tools not listed in the Additional Heating Element Modification ).
SPST switch; 5 amps, 120 VAC; or rated higher
3 Spade Connectors (for Switch; 2 if your switch does not illuminate)
Drill bits; 1/16" & 1/4"
Coping saw, with fine blade
Small file, flat

Wiring: (Click on photos to enlarge).

This photo shows the wiring that goes to the faceplate. This is an old photo that was taken when I had replaced my faceplate a few years back. To take the face plate off; first remove the three small screws on the top, and the three larger screws on the bottom. Note two of the bottom screws are located inside the feet that are a part of the faceplate. Make sure you mark down how the wiring is connected, and if you have a camera also take a picture for reference. Another note: don’t set the faceplate out in the sun, it will warp.




Here is a photo of the back of my OBS, with the cover removed. The wire code is BLUE=hot; WHITE=neutral; and GREEN=ground. It’s a good idea to mark which terminal on the back panel is the hot terminal. As you move parts around, and time goes by it is easy to forget which terminal is hot, and which is neutral.




Note that some of the foam insulation directly behind the heating element has melted. Sometime(s) during its 4 years and 8 months that I have had it, it must have overheated. I’m not too concerned, because there is extra insulation behind the element. It appears to be Mineral Wool insulation that has been installed under the foam. The Mineral Wool(?) is only installed directly behind the heating element.


About three years ago the smoker took a dive off its stand. If you look closely at the frame, you can see the damage that occurred when the smoker decided to take its four foot dive. There was also minor damage to the door, but I never lost a day of smoking; even after that accident.

Here is a second photo of the back with the new wiring. It may look like a mess, but if you look closely you'll notice I've used a couple of different color sharpies to mark the wires to indicate which is hot, which ones go to the elements, and which whites wire are for the switch. If your wires are black or too dark to mark with sharpies, use labels or scotch tape and paper to mark the wires, but remove the labels prior to reassembling.




There is one extra wire attached to the blue (hot). That white wire runs under the cabinet and leads to the hot terminal of the switch, if you are not installing a switch the white wire goes directly to the element.

In this photo the white wire on the left of the screen marked with a long red line is the wire I installed to the second element. That runs to the switch, and that will complete the circuit when the switch is on. If I were not adding a switch that is the wire I would have connected with the blue wire.

Because I am adding a switch, there are two extra wires attached to the white (neutral); making a total of 3 wires to that connector. The original wire is hard to see, because it is hidden behind the two new wires; that wire goes to the original element. The second white wire; the one that is unmarked, is wired to the second element. The third white wire that is marked with a red band, runs under the cabinet and goes to the switch to operate the bulb. The third wire are only needed if you are installing an illuminated switch; if your switch has two terminals, this wire is not needed.

Also, if you are not installing the switch, the white wire with the red band is not needed.


This is the bottom of the cabinet where the wires will run to the switch that I am going to install on the faceplate. The first photo shows the original wiring that goes to the face plate. The red wire is the hot that runs from the original element to the power indicator bulb on the faceplate. One white wire runs from the neutral end of the element to the temperature controller, the other white wire runs form the temperature controller to the neutral terminal of the plug, thus completing the neutral connection to the original element.





The second photo shows the three additional wires for the switch.




This photo not only shows the second element installed, but more importantly the wiring coming out of the front. Four wires are for the original element, the other three white wires are for the second element that will be controlled by a switch. Again, it looks like a mess, but if you used a couple of different color sharpies or labels to make distinct marks to identify the wires you will have no problem.







Installing Switch:

For the switch I decided to go with is a SPST (Single Pole Single Throw) Illuminated Rocker Switch. The switch I used is the same switch that Bradley uses for the generator on the OBS. It is convenient to install, because it snaps into place without any additional hardware.

It is rated at 15 amps 250VAC, and there is a bulb which lights to indicate it is in the “ON” position. The easiest place to obtain this switch is from Yard & Pool. They have a well stocked parts inventory, and fast service.
There are different types of SPST switches, both in AC and DC. Make sure your switch is AC. The switch I used is an illuminating switch - a light comes on when the switch is in the "on" position. It has a third terminal for the bulb. Switches that do not illuminate will only have two terminals.

Communicating with Mike, I learned that a 5 amp AC switch would be plenty. So if you choose to use another type of switch just make sure it is at least 5 amps AC.

Whichever type of switch you used you must first determine which terminal controls what. The switch I have, the terminals were marked 1, 2, & 3, with no instructions. With Mikes assistance, he determined with terminal control what, how to test the Ohm with a multimeter, and how to test the switch without a load prior to installation. So when you purchase your switch, make sure you can determine with terminal is “hot”, which completes the circuit, and if there is a third terminal which is neutral.

This is the switch that I used.



Here is a diagram of the wiring.






Below is a template for cutting the switch and making ventilation holes. The photo includes two templates for each.



(Actual size)
Do not resize or scale the picture when you print it. Just click on the picture and print it from your browser window or graphics program. The actual size of the switch template is .375” (.9525 cm) wide and 1.125” (2.8575 cm) high.


For the switch I was installing, the hole size is approximately 1 1/8” x 3/8”. To cut the hole for the switch I first made a paper template. I located and area on the faceplate that would have the most space for ventilation. I tried using different color markers to outline on the faceplate where to cut, but I could not see the lines well. I also tried scribing the lines, but I had difficulty seeing those lines also (note to self; get new glasses). So I opted to use paint; which had its draw backs because the line edges were fuzzy. Well anyway, I got the area marked off good enough to cut the hole.





Mounting the switch vertically does not give you too much room for error in placement; so be careful in placing the template. When the hole is cut to the final size, you will need about an 1/4” lip both top and bottom. It is difficult to measure the location from the front, due to the shape and design of the faceplate. It may be helpful to judge the distance from the back of the faceplate. From the back of the faceplate drill a 1/16” hole at the location the top right corner of the template will be, and used that as a guide when you position the template on the front.


The first photo is a photo looking at the hole from the inside. Look closely and you can see that there is space left at the top and bottom. To cut the hole I first drilled a 1/4” pilot hole and used a coping saw with a fine tooth blade. I made sure I stayed inside the lines, and then used a small file to file the hole to the correct size. You need to be careful not to make the hole too big, the switch should fit snug. The second photo shows the hole from the front. That white grid on the bottom of the faceplate is a template for drilling the ventilation holes.





.


Since the switch was confined to such a tight space, I thought it best to provide some ventilation. I got the idea from the ventilation holes on the bottom of the faceplate for the temperature circuit control board. My ventilation holes covers the same area as the vent for the temperature control. The area is 1 1/8 square inch, with 25 holes. The drill bit size for the holes is 1/8”.






I forgot to take photos of the final wiring to the faceplate. Hook up the original wiring to the temperature control, and the power indicator light. Next hook up the wiring to your switch. Now install the switch by pushing it into the hole. If you cut the hole accurately the switch should snap in and fit snug.
Note: it is easier to hook up the switch if you run the wires through the hole you cut for the switch, and then connect the wires to the switch. Once the wires are connected install push the switch into place.

The finished product: After wiring is hooked up, replace the faceplate. Do not over tighten the six screws. Replace back panel, and bottom panel, again being careful not to over tighten the screws.




In Operation: First photo shows one element on, and the second shows two elements on. This was after approximately 5 and 7 minutes of operation.






Additional Notes:
Be careful drilling the holes in the reflector. Thin stainless steel sheet metal tends to tear. Refer to instructions in Additional Heating Element Modification

Don’t put the back panel of the smoker on until after you have installed the heating element. It makes adjusting the length of the wires easier. With the back off you can pull the wires to the proper length; which is easier then trying to push them from the front.

Measure twice and cut once.

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2018, 02:06:52 am »
Important note about the above directions. After doing this mode, I've learned that the wire colors used by Bradley, are not necessarily the same for every smoker. So don't go by my wiring color code, but follow the existing wiring and mark each wiring accordingly.


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Offline Toker

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2018, 07:26:16 am »
Habs, i don’t need an on/off switch, just the other way that Mr. Walleye posted.


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Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2018, 01:04:23 pm »
I posted that to alert anyone who reads those instructions.


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                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline TedEbear

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2018, 08:37:31 am »
Habs, i don’t need an on/off switch, just the other way that Mr. Walleye posted.


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Then wire it the way Mr. Walleye said to do in the how-to guide.



« Last Edit: January 08, 2018, 08:39:37 am by TedEbear »

Offline Toker

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Re: Yet an other second element question
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2018, 08:40:18 am »
Oh! Thanks, that’s the picture I was looking for! Thanks again man


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