BRADLEY SMOKER | "Taste the Great Outdoors"

Recipe Discussions => Meat => Topic started by: Pachanga on October 18, 2009, 09:12:31 am

Title: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 18, 2009, 09:12:31 am
I picked up a few briskets the other day and took a few photos to go along with a recipe Habanero Smoker kindly edited from pieced together previous posts of mine.  It is located on the excellent site Recipes from the Bradley Smoker Forum (http://www.susanminor.org/).  The specific recipe is Brisket Pachanga (http://www.susanminor.org/forums/showthread.php?t=532).  Included are detailed instructions on picking briskets, trimming, rub, slather, wood type, smoke duration, freezing, reheating and other tips.  I have smoked well over 150 briskets in my Bradley.  Being from West Texas and only smoking in large offsets with mesquite gathered by the trailer load, I was a little embarrassed to use the Bradley which was given to me as a gift.  I am over that.  I can turn out great tasting, moist, bark laden authentic Texas Brisket with less effort than ever before.

The following pictorial shows a four brisket smoke, however, one, two or three can be done the same way.  Less poundage will mean a shorter smoke time.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket025.jpg)

Packer cut brisket before trimming, lean side up.  Wet aged for four weeks. For more on wet aging go to;   http://www.susanminor.org/forums/showthread.php?p=138#post138  I normally process my briskets in a very clean sink that is foil lined making clean up a snap and to catch rub and slather which are used on the last brisket.  In later photos, I removed the foil for better photo clarity.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket029.jpg)

Discolored meat trimmed and fat between muscles removed and folded back.  It is removed after photo.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket030.jpg)

Close up of trimmed deckle.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket032.jpg)

Brisket flipped.  A little trimming of the fat cap where it was overly thick.  Save these trimmings and place on the top shelf for self basting and a treat for your hounds.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket039.jpg)

Rubbed and patted in.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket040.jpg)

Mustard Slather on lean side.  We have a problem with the brisket being too long to fit in the Bradley.  But this problem can easily be solved -

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket042.jpg)

Fitting an over-sized brisket: this brisket fits after lifting in the middle and wrinkling the brisket, forming an inverted U.  The brisket will shrink during the smoking stage and flatten out.  Here, we have the fat side up which is the way it will go into the Bradley.  Underneath the brisket basket is a flipped Bradley basket - this keeps surface contact to a minimum, protecting the rub and slather.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/IMGP0703.jpg)

Four briskets loaded with fat side up, deckle ends alternating.  The largest brisket is on bottom, smallest on top.  The baskets are flipped as needed to get at least one inch between briskets.  Trimmings on top.  Can the Bradley handle almost 50 pounds of beef?

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket004.jpg)

The water bowl has been replaced with a half size steam table aluminum pan.  A double layer of foil loosely covers the back half of the v heat deflector to force more even heat in the Bradley.  This is probably not recommended by Bradley.  Do so at your own risk.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/IMGP0707.jpg)

Pour boiling water laced with beer, apple juice, onions, etc. into water pan.  This may need to be refilled once during the night depending on heat level and vent opening.  These briskets were started about 9:30 PM.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/IMGP0711.jpg)

Open the door the next morning to check if anything crazy is happening.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket060.jpg)

Empty grease and used pucks and refill with boiling water.  Incomplete burning of pucks means it is time to wire brush the smoke generator heater element.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket065.jpg)

Bottom brisket is monitored with probe and checked for fork tender at 185 degrees F. and then checked every five degrees thereafter.  Most briskets come out around 190 to 195 degrees.  I have never taken a brisket beyond 195.  When the door is open for this check is the time to baste or spritz.  Move all briskets down as you take each brisket out.  The last brisket will come off between 18 and 22 hours if you maintained heat at 220 to 225 degrees F.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket094.jpg)

Smoke and moisture are the keys to great brisket.  Two probes in the flat of the bottom brisket (I like confirmed temperature readings) and a chamber temperature monitor on the front of the bottom shelf (the six rack digital has a rear mounted chamber temperature gauge also).  Check all probes for accuracy by inserting tips in boiling water  before each smoke.  Do not totally immerse the entire probe.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket067.jpg)

Finished fat side of brisket.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket068.jpg)

Finished lean side.  This brisket is so tender, it is trying to crack open under its own weight before FTC.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket080.jpg)

Another finished brisket and the way the bark should look.  This is not burned, it is pure layer of flavored bark.  This is the hallmark of Authentic Texas Brisket.  I will be posting soon on my reasons for not foiling in the Bradley.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket070.jpg)

Foil, towel, cooler.  This is the first time this brisket has touched foil.  No wrapping or boating during the smoking process which retards bark formation.  As each brisket comes out, it is now foil wrapped, stacked on top of the previous brisket and wrapped in the towel (after I taste test a little of the bark off the deckle end).

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket092.jpg)

Sliced and ready for the table.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/bisket103.jpg)

No knives needed here.  This brisket cuts with a fork.

(http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac287/Ofrazier01/Dogs005.jpg)

Don't forget the hounds.

Other Threads:

Brisket Pachanga
http://www.susanminor.org/forums/showthread.php?t=532

Mustard Slather on Brisket and other Meats
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12112.0

I Prefer to Smoke Totally Naked - A Brisket and Ribs Manifesto
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12455.0

So your brisket doesn't fit - solution here
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=13080.0

How do you make burnt ends?
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=14065.0

To Mop or Not to Mop – That is the Question
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=14240.0

Calling All Mop Recipes
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=14446.0

Good luck and slow smoking.

Pachanga
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: ExpatCanadian on October 18, 2009, 09:43:14 am
Wow...  looks incredible!  I've got a couple briskets in my freezer....  to date I've been all about pig....  but I think this could be next weekends project!  Great photos and commentary!
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Hopefull Romantic on October 18, 2009, 10:04:12 am
Great looking briskets Pachanga. Really Great.

HR
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: monty on October 18, 2009, 10:10:09 am
Another great write-up there, Pachanga. Your tutorial on the recipe site is incredibly well detailed and informative.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: watchdog56 on October 18, 2009, 10:12:16 am
very informative. Looks great. Thank you for the step by step.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Tenpoint5 on October 18, 2009, 10:35:14 am
Looks great Pachanga!!
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: pensrock on October 18, 2009, 01:34:10 pm
Lots of good eats in that batch.  :)
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Habanero Smoker on October 18, 2009, 01:54:56 pm
Nice pictorial. I will use some of your pictures on the recipe site.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: classicrockgriller on October 18, 2009, 05:11:04 pm
Thanks again for a smoking education. This is a re-read again and again.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: HawkeyeSmokes on October 18, 2009, 05:56:28 pm
Always enjoy seeing a post from one on the true masters! That looks just awesome Pachanga!
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: classicrockgriller on October 18, 2009, 10:13:10 pm
How long did you smoke your briskets.

I know you started at 9:30 and you said you check it in the morning.

9 to 10 hrs?
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 18, 2009, 10:43:00 pm
CRG

The last brisket usually comes off at 18 to 20 hours on a three or four brisket smoke.  Twenty-two hours is not uncommon.  The brisket will tell you when he's ready; usually around 190 to 195 degrees but the test is fork tender.  The first brisket will come off around 16 hours but as low as 14 hours.  There are variables such as chamber temperature, outside temperature and vent opening.  Individual brisket weight and total brisket weight are also hefty variables.  Most of my briskets are 10 to 12 pounders.  Less briskets take less time.  This may seem like a long time but the first brisket comes off within four hours of a brisket's normal smoke time on most offsets that I use and the effort is so much less.

One of the great points and advantages of the Bradley is that I am not afraid to leave everything rolling on its own.  Near the end of a smoke, I will set my remote temperature alarm to 185 with the probe in the lowest brisket and stay within earshot.

I go into more detail in the recipe.

Pachanga
  
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: classicrockgriller on October 18, 2009, 10:50:36 pm
ok, no more questions
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: squirtthecat on October 19, 2009, 07:10:49 am

So if you go with 1 brisket, do you load it on the very bottom rack?

Also, how much smoke did you apply?  Forgive me if you mentioned that in the post, as I read through it quickly (concentrating on the pics vs the content!).

Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: dbrown1 on October 19, 2009, 08:30:26 am
Wow those look amazing !!
I had the same question as Squirt, I have a small family and four briskets is too much for me to do at any one time..
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 19, 2009, 09:44:17 am
Dbrown1 and Squirtthecat,

Every smoker I have ever dealt with was a learning process.  The Bradley was no different.  Your Bradley will be different than mine and then there are the variables I mentioned above to CRG.

Be sure you have a packer cut brisket and not a trimmed brisket.  A trimmed brisket is more suited to braising in the oven.  If you have a 12 pounder, I would start on the second rack form the bottom and then move it down if I feel things are too slow.  If you start the smoke at night and want a good nights sleep, move up to the third rack and set the temperature lower.  Around 200 degrees F.  The larger amount of water will help to regulate the temperature.  When I was first experimenting, I kept a remote alarm next to my bed with the probe plugged into the bottom brisket.

Raising the temperature slowly until you get used to your how your smoker responds to brisket is the prudent action. 

I rarely smoke one brisket at a time.  I would smoke at  least two and freeze one.  See the recipe for freezing and heating instructions.  A frozen and then reheated brisket is great for parties, unexpected guest, pot lucks and church gatherings.  The recipe will explain freezing a single brisket in portions for smaller families.

Length of smoking will depend on your wood selection.  A strong wood will overpower the brisket on a long smoke.  Even though I am from Texas and have always smoked with mesquite and oak, I find that the Bradley mesquite is very strong and taints the flavor in a long smoke.  The truth is that wood for big smokers is burned down to coals in a separate pit and only the coals are used which provide a light smoke.  Logs are used just occasionally. This method goes back to the early days of barbecue when dugout pits were used. Holes were left in the wire rack every four feet to insert more coals.  The Bradley mesquite smoke is much different than this method and produces a different smoke flavor.

I use mostly apple, hickory, oak and a touch of mesquite.  I load the smoker to full and when this runs out, I stop the smoke for a while.  As the brisket gains temperature, I finish with apple.  The recipe goes into further detail.

Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga


Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: BareBones on October 19, 2009, 10:15:58 am
A little off topic but...

What kind of puppies do you have there!? They are great!
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 19, 2009, 11:36:20 am
Thanks for asking.  This is not off topic; they are a part of the recipe and cooking technique.  My pups are Brittanys.  They are also known as Brittany Spaniels but this is a misnomer.  Spaniels are flushing dogs.  A good Brittany is a more of a pointer with an outstanding nose.  They have traveled over several states pointing pheasant and quail.  They are great retrievers for dove, duck and geese.  I live on a lake and they are real water dogs, retrieving further than I can shoot (and love to ride in the boat).  They are wonderful kids' dogs and are willing to stand still while their noses are pinched, ears tugged and tail pulled by the little ones.  Its all in a days work.  They make a pretty good pillow during a rest on a long hunt.  They are some fine hounds, buddies and compadres.

I did have five.  I lost their Mom to cancer and their Dad to a heart attack. The Mom had 32 champions in her direct family bloodline line and the Dad had 28.  Two of them were the most famous Brittanies ever; Beans Blaze and Bandee which appear on both side of their papers.

They are all finished hunting dogs but act like family members.  They are always at the ready during outdoor cooking.

Pachanga
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: BareBones on October 20, 2009, 07:14:02 am
That is some great lineage! I have a dog that is part Brittany, part Setter and probably a few other things as well... While his lineage is "questionable" :) he has many of the same qualities of your family members. He goes with me everywhere and is amazing. I could only imagine having 3 of him around. Thanks for all the info!

BillC
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: dbrown1 on October 20, 2009, 08:34:32 am
Thanks for the tips Pachanga I appreciate it, thanks again and love your pooches
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: squirtthecat on October 24, 2009, 07:00:56 am

Thanks Pachanga.

My wife had a pair of Brittanys growing up..  Beautiful dogs.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: DjSaneR on October 26, 2009, 12:55:08 pm
OMG that looks absolutely delicious! 

I just read your writeup and I think I'm already off to a bad start.  The brisket I bought does not have the fat cap.  As you stated I purchased mine from a local supermarket.. It seems certain that I will end up with a dry hunk of meat.  What else can I do with this brisket?  I don't want to waste it and I don't want to smoke something that's bound to be dry.  This will be my 1st brisket ever and I'm very new to the smoking world.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: FLBentRider on October 26, 2009, 01:05:06 pm
Well...

You could try a bacon wrap where the fat should be. I've not done bacon on beef, but bacon makes everything better...

You could cure it and make pastrami, but I'm not sure I would tackle that as your first brisket. It's not that complicated, it just requires supplies that you probably don't have or may have trouble getting locally ( I know I can't buy curing supplies in South Florida)

or....

maybe talk to the butcher at your (super)market and see if you can buy some beef fat and make your own cap.

Good Luck.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: ArnieM on October 26, 2009, 01:19:31 pm
Dj, I wouldn't worry too much yet.  Granted, I'm not from Texas and as such may not be qualified to give advice.  ;)

Mu first brisket came from a supermarket.  They had whole brisket on sale.  The 'regular' which was about 13 pounds and an Angus, for twice the price, that was about 9.5 pounds.  The latter must have been much more trimmed but I went for it anyway.  Cut it in half, more or less, and did it on two racks.  It took about 2 hours per pound at about 210 with a few hours of oak.

The general consensus was that it came out good.  Next time, I'll get the cheaper one.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 26, 2009, 03:06:14 pm
Saner,

I do not wish to confuse or complicate the issue.  Smoking should be fun.  It sounds like the brisket in question is a trimmed flat (?) and as such it lends itself to braising or foiling which should not be confused with Authentic Barbeque, however, after smoking well over 150 briskets in the Bradley and hundreds more on other pits, I can safely state that there are techniques that can be used to still truly barbeque the flat and not finish it in the oven if the wish is to produce Authentic Texas brisket with a tasty and unique bark.

FlBentRider and others have some accurate and admirable suggestions which I will include below.

Do not be discouraged.  What I describe below is not hard or arduous. It is a learning experience and one which will help your future Qing.  This is going to turn out fine.

I start my briskets at night but this flat should be started early in the morning so that you can monitor it.  Use a probe as I describe in my recipe.  Make sure you have an adequate water source in your Smoker like a half size steam table aluminum pan.  Fill it and refill it with boiling water laced with beer, apple juice etc.  Temperature should be a little lower than normal, around 210 to 215.  Stay below 225 degrees. My six rack digital does not register accurately so I recommend a chamber probe on the meat rack.  Low temperature is critical.

Inject the brisket with butter or canola oil mixed with strong beef broth and a little Worcestershire if you feel comfortable doing so.  This will help but is not absolutely necessary.

Buy some beef tallow or pork fat at the butcher shop for a few pennies or buy bacon and place on a shelf a few inches above the brisket.  This may need to be changed or added to during the smoke.  This will baste the brisket.  You are in effect replacing the fat cap so use plenty.  I would not lie this tallow or pork on the brisket because it will inhibit the bark formation.  Do not throw this fat away; we may use it later for chopped brisket.  Another alternative would be to smoke another fatty meat above this brisket.

Use a mustard slather and go a little heavy.  Go a little lighter with a low salt rub.

Place the brisket a couple of shelves up from the bottom and make a foil pan on the bottom shelf to catch drippings and keep direct heat off the brisket.  Add a little water to this pan; continue to add water throughout the smoke and save any liquids left for later use.  

After the slather has firmed up, baste with the following concoction.  Remember that oil replaces fat so go heavy on the butter.  I cut and pasted this from my personal recipes and I adjust it according to my needs. Adjust according your rub ingredients.  You will want to omit the tomato juice and jalapeños until the last third of the smoke and omit the salt completely until almost finished.  When you first taste this, you may wonder about the flavor, but you will find yourself going back again and again for another taste.

Pachanga’s Basting Sauce
Use this Basting Sauce over meats as a marinade or a basting sauce, especially when grilling meats that dry out. This is a good dove, quail and duck baste.  This also adds a lot of flavor to brisket and chicken.  The amount of butter, beer and tomato sauce is a matter of taste and application.  Experiment with these three ingredients to get your desired results.  Start with half the butter and beer with no tomato sauce and add to suite your taste.  The tomato sauce will burn if basting long term.  Add this at the last of the cooking for a change of flavor and layering of flavor.  

1 or 2 sticks butter or olive oil equivalent
2/3 Cup Worcestershire
2 cloves fresh minced garlic or 1 teaspoon granulated
1/8 teaspoon cumin
1/8 teaspoon oregano
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 Tablespoon fresh ground black pepper
Juice of one lemon or lime
½ to 1 can dark beer
4 to 16 ounces tomato sauce
½ diced onion
1/3 cup brown sugar or apple juice
3 large jalapenos seeded and finely minced

Melt butter in sauce pan, and when hot add onion and sauté to just turning brown.  Add remaining seasonings and cook for 30 seconds.  Slowly add beer and remaining ingredients.  Simmer for 10 minutes and keep hot while in use.  This sauce keeps well in the refrigerator.  

You can actually baste through the smoke vent to preserve heat with a dedicated Pump sprayer, a good squirt bottle and a keen eye or dribble through a funnel and copper tube but only a crazy old baster would think of that.

I normally do not flip my briskets but about halfway through, flip with silicon mitts or put another Bradley basket on top of the brisket and flip.

When you baste, gently press the meat like you would when cooking a steak.  There should be some jiggle and spring.  If the meat starts to firm up and you are past 185 degrees, pull go to the next step.  I would prefer to keep smoking up to fork tender which can be anywhere between 185 and 195 degrees.  

When finished barbequing add 2 or three tablespoons of apple juice to top of the brisket, wrap the brisket in foil and a towel, place in a cooler for about two hours where the brisket will continue to cook.  

When you slice the brisket, if it is not moist, pour any juices that have settled in the foil and the caught juices in the Bradley along with a little melted butter over the sliced meat.

This is all off the top of my head and I may think of more later or I am sure some members more qualified than me will add to this.  Read the following posts and recipes and they may help answer other questions about wood, smoke time, etc. but feel free to write back.

If this still does not work out and things are a little dry, get back with me and we’ll make burnt ends (a real delicacy) or chopped brisket sandwiches which will not be forgotten or brisket beans.  Above all, don’t fret about it and just have fun.  

To those that are interested in Authentic Texas Barbequed Brisket, I write about my experiences with brisket in the following posts.

A Recipe along with tips and tricks.
http://www.susanminor.org/forums/showthread.php?t=532

Slathers for brisket, ribs, etc which will improve bark, tenderness and moisture.
 http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12112.msg137563#msg137563

Let me know how it turns out.

Good luck and slow smoking.

Pachanga



Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: ArnieM on October 26, 2009, 04:37:08 pm
Pachanga, you're just a fountain of information.  Please keep up the posts.

I'd go for more beer in your basting sauce recipe; I'll take care of the excess.  ;D  Seriously, I'd probably up the cumin too.  I just love the stuff.

I've bookmarked this thread.  I'm going to have to try this out the next time I can get some brisket on sale.

Again, thanks for your info.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: westexasmoker on October 26, 2009, 05:43:54 pm
No mustard on brisket!!...Pork yes, beef no, but to each their own....and I rarely do pork!   ;D

C
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: JGW on October 26, 2009, 06:20:03 pm
I'd have to go with WTS on this one.   ;D   Course, other than his use of Mesquite and my use of Oak....I don't think we differ much when it comes Brisket.

Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: DjSaneR on October 26, 2009, 08:04:40 pm
Pachanga, thank you for this extensive amount of information you have provided us with.  I will load up the rack above the brisket with bacon to substitute the natural fat which mine is missing.  Thanks again and I will post my results.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: DjSaneR on October 27, 2009, 05:03:25 pm
Ok, the wife decided to make some sort of roast out of the "fat free" brisket I had, which solved my problem.  I went out and bought myself a proper brisket.  So am I smoking this fat side up?
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: FLBentRider on October 27, 2009, 05:07:24 pm
So am I smoking this fat side up?

This has been a subject of much debate...

Fat side up.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: westexasmoker on October 27, 2009, 05:08:07 pm
Always fat cap side up..IMO..self basting!

C
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: ArnieM on October 27, 2009, 05:12:07 pm
Yep, for me, always fat side up for beef and pork, skin side up for poultry.  It is, as was said, self-basting.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: HawkeyeSmokes on October 27, 2009, 05:26:11 pm
Fat side up all the way here to!  ;D
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: classicrockgriller on October 27, 2009, 05:44:03 pm
Was in Houston on Saturday and stopped at a BBQ place that had a sign "Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket". I ask the person that took my order how they cooked their brisket and she said she couldn't tell me cause it was a trade secret. I ask her how do I know it was authentic texas barbq, she said this is how we have always done it. The brisket was real good, but I was confused.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: ArnieM on October 27, 2009, 05:58:51 pm
Was in Houston on Saturday and stopped at a BBQ place that had a sign "Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket".

I could understand a sign like that if it was in CA, MN, CT, ME, etc.  But, why would one need a sign like that in Texas?
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Ka Honu on October 27, 2009, 06:10:17 pm
I could understand a sign like that if it was in CA, MN, CT, ME, etc.  But, why would one need a sign like that in Texas?

If you'd tried some of the cardboard served as "brisket" in Texas these days (especially in some of the big cities - can't get away with it out in the sticks), you'd wish they had a sign and a license!
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: classicrockgriller on October 27, 2009, 06:16:58 pm
Like I said, I'm confused. I know what I like and That day it was some brisket I liked.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: DjSaneR on October 27, 2009, 06:20:33 pm
Fatty Up it is!  :)
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Savannahsmoker on October 27, 2009, 08:21:46 pm
They look so good I guess I will have to try my first Brisket.  Thank You
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 28, 2009, 08:05:23 am
Quote
Posted by: westexasmoker
Insert Quote
No mustard on brisket!!...Pork yes, beef no, but to each their own....and I rarely do pork!   Grin
Quote
Posted by: JGW
Insert Quote
I'd have to go with WTS on this one.   Grin   Course, other than his use of Mesquite and my use of Oak....I don't think we differ much when it comes Brisket.

WTS and JGW

Thank you for your opinion on the mustard.  Even though I disagree, I respect your thoughts as well as your use of the Bradley and I appreciate your posts.  I wonder if you have ever tried mustard as a slather on brisket.  What were your objections?

I am a mustard on ham fan as a condiment but I do not use mustard as a condiment on brisket.  However, as a slather, the mustard loses its flavor in the smoking process and turns to a nice bark.  There is no residual taste that we would recognize as mustard flavor.

I recently posted a thread on mustard slather (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12112.0 )  relating the science behind mustard’s properties and their reaction with brisket.  In it I wrote, “Mustard is made of mustard flour, vinegar and other ingredients.  Science tells us that the enzymes in the mustard flour breaks down collagen that acts as connective tissue in meats.  Vinegar is an acid.  When exposed to acid collagen is softened to gelatin.  The collagen fibers exhibit swelling and retain more water. This opens the meat up to accept the flavors of the rub.  Therefore, mustard slather reacts with meat using two distinct properties; enzymes and acids.  The slather also aids in moisture retention and flavor absorption.  This produces a flavorful, moist and tender meat.  At the same time, it produces a nice crust or bark on the meat.  This stuff sounds like a miracle drug for a Q’er.” 

Despite your disparaging opinion, science and taste of the final product convince me that this is a very good addition to brisket as well as other meats. Thousands of other smokers, much more accomplished than me, consider this a staple in their arsenal for smoking brisket.  For those who have not used a mustard slather and are confused or nervous about trying it, take a lesson from some Legends of Barbeque.

Fort Worth, Texas pit boss legend Walter Jetton put on a little barbeque for 250 at the LBJ (President Johnson)  Pedernales Ranch, Texas in 1964.  Besides calling for a pit 3 foot deep, 4 feet wide and 40 feet long, his beef stock mop contained ¾ cup dry mustard and 2 quarts vinegar (sounds like mustard to me).  The meat was brisket.  Jim Goode, another Texas legend, calls for mustard in his rub and mop for brisket.  Paul Kirk, one of the most awarded Q’ers ever, devotes an entire chapter in one of his books to Mustard slathers which are used on his competition brisket, ribs and chicken. 

WTS and JGW, as you say, to each his own.  I’ll have to go with the Legends of Barbeque on this one.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga

Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 28, 2009, 08:13:50 am
Saner,

I have been offline for a while: ribs and cinnamon chicken in the Bradley.  Garlic parmesan mashed potatoes, homemade Parker House Rolls, cast iron skillet fried straight neck squash, family and friends.

I am glad you purchased a packer cut brisket.  What is the poundage of your new brisket? 
You may still want to smoke the first brisket while smoking the second. 

As previously stated, fat cap up or fat cap down is the subject of much debate.

Some say fat down to keep the heat from drying the bottom out.  Some say fat side up to self baste all the way through the brisket.  Some say flip the brisket half way through for the best of both worlds. 

The answer is, everyone is right.  Cap up or cap down depends on the smoker; whether it is a vertical or horizontal, the protective heat and smoke plate, how the heat travels through the smoker, the position of the exhaust chimney, the protective rub or slather, the frequency of basting, the temperature and the amount of moisture involved. 

Mostly, in the unmodified  Bradley (no fan), I would suggest fat cap up, even though I have smoked several briskets and left the bottom brisket fat cap down because it was being basted from the brisket above while being protected from the heat below by the fat cap down. 

A person needs to know their smoker and how to use it.  In the Bradley, if I use a mustard slather or other protective coating, I generally go fat cap up due to high moisture content, low heat, adjustable heat circulation, convenience and lack of memory cells to tell me when to flip, twist or somersault (alcohol may be a contributing factor of the later).

When I say adjustable heat circulation, I am referring to a method I use in the Bradley.  If the bottom of the brisket seems to be drying, lay a piece of foil on a flipped empty basket underneath the brisket (not the rack the brisket is sitting on), blocking the middle of the rack.  If the foil tries to move around, press it between two baskets. You can also form a bowl and add water for more moisture and a further lowering of the heat directly beneath the brisket.  The direct heat will bypass the bottom of the brisket and the heat differential between the top and bottom of the brisket will lessen. You shouldn’t need this if you have the brisket on shelf two or three from the bottom but move the brisket down if necessary.  Remember, low and slow.

I have mentioned in the past loosely covering the v heat deflector with a double layer of foil and have posted a photo in my thread Authentic Texas Brisket (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12061.0).  This will help to equalize the front and rear temperatures in the Bradley.  If you do not do this, I would rotate (not flip) the brisket basket a couple of times during the smoke.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga


Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: DjSaneR on October 28, 2009, 08:53:43 am
I am glad you purchased a packer cut brisket.  What is the poundage of your new brisket? 
You may still want to smoke the first brisket while smoking the second.
It's a 6lb brisket. It's only my wife, myself and our 3 year old daughter.  We'll have PLENTY of leftovers =)

 
I have mentioned in the past loosely covering the v heat deflector with a double layer of foil and have posted a photo in my thread Authentic Texas Brisket (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12061.0).  This will help to equalize the front and rear temperatures in the Bradley.  If you do not do this, I would rotate (not flip) the brisket basket a couple of times during the smoke.
If I decided not to cover the sheild would I still need to rotate even if I place the brisket on one of the higher racks?
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 28, 2009, 09:19:12 am
Saner,

I would rotate.  I have monitored the temperatures in my six rack digital and there is a large differential in front and rear temperature.  It makes sense due to the location of the heating element.  Placing the brisket in a higher rack will help as the temperature evens out higher up but I would still rotate.  A chamber probe is a very useful tool and worth purchasing.  Keep the probe on the shelf of the lowest item being smoked.  Before smoking, move it around and get to know your Bradley.  You can do this in an empty Bradley or load a pan of water in it to simulate the meat before smoking. 

By the way, I keep my vent over half open nearly all the time except for preheating or trying to rapidly increase the temperature. You do not want wet smoke to condense in the cabinet and onto the brisket.

Smoking is a science and an art.  Until you know your smoker, you will need to hang around and monitor smoke, heat, rack position, water, vent etc.  Once you get a system down, you will be able to easily duplicate the results over and over while watching a football game, fooling with the dogs or sleeping.

The brisket sounds small.  Is the deckle still attached?  Is it cryovaced?  Are you going to wet age?  How about a photo if it is not too much trouble.

Hug on that 3 year old, she'll be twenty in a blink.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga

Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: DjSaneR on October 28, 2009, 12:15:17 pm
I think I like the idea of the deflector, however, I'm afraid of damaging the heating unit. 

I'll try to take some pictures of the brisket tonight.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 28, 2009, 12:55:23 pm
Saner,

I have been using a deflector since I first got my Bradley with no problems or incident.  I am on the original heating element.  However, I would say this practice is probably frowned upon by Bradley.  Do so at your own risk.  If you look at the photo, the foil is loose and allows the heat to rise through all of the vents including the back vents but the heat then moves forward and emerges from the front lip of the foil in the center of the Bradley so the element should not be affected much if any.

Another solution would be to foil the back center of a basket on the first level to force the heat to the edges and middle. Check your chamber temperatures and see if you have the same experiences as I have.  Reviewing your photos on the Six Rack Digital Page, things look like they cooked nicely.  You have a newer 6 rack model and maybe it is different in the defector or other area.

Moving a chamber probe around is an interesting exercise and will help you get familiar with your Bradley.  My Bradley definitely has hot and hotter areas just like every grill I have owned and even my Bosch double oven (which was supposed to be perfect).

This low tech solution works for me.  There are some very intelligent people on this board who I respect tremendously. They may chime in with other solutions or ideas or point you to previous threads.  I am amazed at some of the gadgets that have been posted on this board. I feel fairly sane after seeing some of the projects.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: JGW on October 28, 2009, 07:51:16 pm
Pachanga,

I hope you took my comment as a disagreement on preparation.  No offense meant. 

If you like it, good deal.  Hell, if you served me some...I'd probably never know, and if I hinted a taste mustard I would have assumed you used some dry mustard in the rub.

I haven't tried mustard on brisket as a slather, as (in my opinion) it isn't necessary.  I grew up in Tx (Hill country....S.A., Austin, Gruene) and have never known anyone that uses mustard.   

Like anything, there's no ONE way to do anything - all comes down to preference. 

Smoke on, brother.   :)
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 29, 2009, 03:37:49 pm
Quote
Quote
Posted by: westexasmoker
Insert Quote
No mustard on brisket!!...Pork yes, beef no, but to each their own....and I rarely do pork!   Grin
Quote
Posted by: JGW
Insert Quote
I'd have to go with WTS on this one.   Grin   Course, other than his use of Mesquite and my use of Oak....I don't think we differ much when it comes Brisket.

Quote
WTS and JGW

Thank you for your opinion on the mustard.  Even though I disagree, I respect your thoughts as well as your use of the Bradley and I appreciate your posts.  I wonder if you have ever tried mustard as a slather on brisket.  What were your objections?

I am a mustard on ham fan as a condiment but I do not use mustard as a condiment on brisket.  However, as a slather, the mustard loses its flavor in the smoking process and turns to a nice bark.  There is no residual taste that we would recognize as mustard flavor.

I recently posted a thread on mustard slather (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12112.0 )  relating the science behind mustard’s properties and their reaction with brisket.  In it I wrote, “Mustard is made of mustard flour, vinegar and other ingredients.  Science tells us that the enzymes in the mustard flour breaks down collagen that acts as connective tissue in meats.  Vinegar is an acid.  When exposed to acid collagen is softened to gelatin.  The collagen fibers exhibit swelling and retain more water. This opens the meat up to accept the flavors of the rub.  Therefore, mustard slather reacts with meat using two distinct properties; enzymes and acids.  The slather also aids in moisture retention and flavor absorption.  This produces a flavorful, moist and tender meat.  At the same time, it produces a nice crust or bark on the meat.  This stuff sounds like a miracle drug for a Q’er.”

Despite your disparaging opinion, science and taste of the final product convince me that this is a very good addition to brisket as well as other meats. Thousands of other smokers, much more accomplished than me, consider this a staple in their arsenal for smoking brisket.  For those who have not used a mustard slather and are confused or nervous about trying it, take a lesson from some Legends of Barbeque.

Fort Worth, Texas pit boss legend Walter Jetton put on a little barbeque for 250 at the LBJ (President Johnson)  Pedernales Ranch, Texas in 1964.  Besides calling for a pit 3 foot deep, 4 feet wide and 40 feet long, his beef stock mop contained ¾ cup dry mustard and 2 quarts vinegar (sounds like mustard to me).  The meat was brisket.  Jim Goode, another Texas legend, calls for mustard in his rub and mop for brisket.  Paul Kirk, one of the most awarded Q’ers ever, devotes an entire chapter in one of his books to Mustard slathers which are used on his competition brisket, ribs and chicken.

WTS and JGW, as you say, to each his own.  I’ll have to go with the Legends of Barbeque on this one.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga

Quote
Posted by: JGW
Insert Quote
Pachanga,

I hope you took my comment as a disagreement on preparation.  No offense meant.

If you like it, good deal.  Hell, if you served me some...I'd probably never know, and if I hinted a taste mustard I would have assumed you used some dry mustard in the rub.

I haven't tried mustard on brisket as a slather, as (in my opinion) it isn't necessary.  I grew up in Tx (Hill country....S.A., Austin, Gruene) and have never known anyone that uses mustard.  

Like anything, there's no ONE way to do anything - all comes down to preference.

Smoke on, brother.   Smiley



JGW,

I appreciate your reply.

You just named some of my favorite Texas haunts besides Corpus Christi on the coast.  A mix of Mexican, German, LBJ political and Hippie barbeque.   My sister lives in San Antonio by way of Corpus, my son received his graduate and masters from The University of Texas (he worked for a Senator friend of mine at the Capitol while in School) and we have canoed the Guadalupe River many, many times.  Gruene is one neat town (motto - gently resisting change since 1872), not to mention  the old dance hall (can you say Wille Nelson?) and its other German influences.  Of course, the Germans and the Mexicans had tremendous influence on Texas Cowboy Barbeque.

I have read some of your posts and I knew you had received a Master’s degree in Texas Barbeque from somewhere.  It turns out you were influenced in the great melting pot of Barbeque.

I take no offense from your comments.  I mean no offense by mine, just a discussion between two cowboys.

I have stated before that I received my Bradley as a gift, and was embarrassed to use it.  Then I discovered that it was a real honest to goodness pit that could produce all manner of good eats and would certainly produce fine to superior Authentic Barbeque.  I wanted to thank this board and its many experts in countless areas of smokology who kindly and without reservation share their recipes, techniques and secrets.  I decided to give back by promoting Authentic Barbeque in the Bradley to anyone who would listen.  I will continue to do so.

When two people known as brisket aficionados compose a post stating mustard has no place near a brisket (“No mustard on brisket!!”) without elaboration and I have recently posted lengthy threads extolling mustards virtues on brisket (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12112.0) and included it in an Authentic Texas Barbequed Brisket techniques recipe (http://www.susanminor.org/forums/showthread.php?t=532), one has two choices.  

     1.   Stay silent and concede, which in effect validates the no mustard opinion (without support or elaboration) and discount everything I have posted.  My efforts to promote authentic barbeque in the Bradley would be diminished and I might as well fold my tent, pack up my smoker and go home.

     2.   Defend my position with facts, science, experience and expert testimony.  (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12061.30)  While asking the other parties to expound on their position further than just, “No mustard on brisket!! “  Readers of the posts can then intelligently decide on a method with more complete information from both parties.

I will always choose the later.  I am certainly not offended and enjoy a good debate.  I only post sporadically because when I do, I spend an inordinate amount of time compiling accurate facts, choosing my words carefully and try to post a clear, concise, explanation which adds to the conversation.  If someone wants to debate, bring both barrels and a sack lunch. One liners will not cut the mustard (pun intended).

You state that “I haven't tried mustard on brisket as a slather, as (in my opinion) it isn't necessary” and “have never known anyone that uses mustard”.  

I had never known anyone to use a mustard slather until a few years ago.  I thought “what a waste of meat” until I tasted it and discovered no hint of mustard, only a beautiful bark, the hallmark of barbeque, and tender moist meat.  As others have said (Carneyscud, FLBentRider come to mind) and I paraphrase , salt and pepper, meat and smoke, that’s all that is needed for Authentic Barbeque.   I agree whole heartedly and have Qed many a brisket that way and will do so again in that simple (yet very complicated) manner.  The mustard slather is actually a minor part of my brisket smoke and it can stay or go. I do believe it is a particularly useful technique in the Bradley because it acts as a long term baste beside the many other attributes described in earlier posts.  It is wise to keep the Bradley door closed due to slow heat recovery.  

There are always variations adding subtle nuances to the process and interesting things to try while remaining on the Authentic Barbeque reservation.  I personally would not post an agreement with a statement like “No mustard on brisket!!” if I had never tried or experienced it.  As I noted in my response, three legends of barbeque (to name just a few) did try mustard on their brisket and they stuck with it. There is also good science behind its use.  As you rightly state “there's no ONE way to do anything - all comes down to preference”, hence I thought the “No mustard on brisket!!” comment was obtuse and not instructive.  I don’t mind disagreement (I am always interested in furthering my education) but I learn nothing when no argumentative reasoning is present to ponder.

I would be proud to sit down next to a cooler full of Shiner Bock, Lone Star, Negra Modelo, Dos Equis, and Miller High Life and watch you barbeque.  I am sure I would pick up some good tips, eat some great barbeque (probably some Mexican food) and enjoy a heck of a conversation.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking.

Pachanga


Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: HawkeyeSmokes on October 29, 2009, 05:01:33 pm
Pachanga, I would like to thank you for your very informative posts. Every time I read one it makes me stop and think for a bit. And I learn from every one of them. The first time I smoked a whole brisket I used your technique from the recipe site to make it fit on a Bradley rack and it worked great. Now, I have to decide, will the next one have a light mustard slather? I think it might because that is the only way for me to know how I like it. Once again, thank you for the great info.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: classicrockgriller on October 29, 2009, 06:06:22 pm
I think you miss-quoted me out of context. I Never said that. I'm here to learn and make good q. I have slathered rubbed slated and peppered pinched and slapped a variety of meats I have cooked. But I couldn't or wouldn't cook 150 briskets the same way. I like to get something to where I like it and then move on to try it a different way. I have enjoyed reading your post and your explanations on how you do things.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 29, 2009, 06:22:49 pm
CRG,

I apologize for the misquote.  I was quoting from memory and once again my weak mind fails me.  I am modifying the post accordingly.

Thanks again.

Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga

Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: FLBentRider on October 29, 2009, 06:27:04 pm
No harm no foul Pachanga.

I never used the word "authentic", but the spirit of the comment was there.

I have gleaned much from your posts as well, and appreciate the time and effort you put into them.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 29, 2009, 06:56:31 pm
FLBentrider,

Thanks for giving me some latitude and I appreciate your comment.  Now that I think about it, Carneyscud left out the salt and pepper.

Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga
Title: Film at 11 (or not)
Post by: Ka Honu on October 29, 2009, 07:44:49 pm
Announcing my next smoke - the one and only "authentic, lots-of-other-peoples'-secret-receipts-mixed-together, rubbed-with-or-without-CYM-slather (depending on the phase of the moon at the time), smoked (and maybe boated, depending on the severity of sunspots in the area) by an amphibious reptilian outside one of those cheap townhouses across the street from Kaneohe Yacht Club, Texas-inspired brisket."  I'd sell it commercially but the label printing costs would be prohibitive.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 29, 2009, 07:47:02 pm
GRG,

Quote
I have slathered rubbed slated and peppered pinched and slapped a variety of meats I have cooked. But I couldn't or wouldn't cook 150 briskets the same way. I like to get something to where I like it and then move on to try it a different way.

I reread your post and I think you are giving us a little too much information regarding your personal life with meats. 

For the record, I did smoke the 150 plus briskets in a variety of ways (ok, I slapped and pinched a few).  Like you, I am curious and continue to experiment but the mustard slather I posted is a safe bet that has never failed me.  I have prepared it with many different additional ingredients. 

I have a radically different idea for my next smoke. I will post it if it works out.

Thank you for your comments and posts. 

See you around the pit,

Pachanga



   
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on October 29, 2009, 07:55:43 pm
Ka Honu,

I'm guessing pineapple with some sort of poi fish sauce slather, burying it in the ground wrapped in a pig surrounded by hot rocks.  That would be the proper base mixture under a quarter moon or at least that's what I read somewhere--------maybe.

Wish I was there and you were here.

See you around the pig pit,

Pachanga

 
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Scotty-G on October 29, 2009, 08:02:07 pm
"authentic, lots-of-other-peoples'-secret-receipts-mixed-together, rubbed-with-or-without-CYM-slather (depending on the phase of the moon at the time), smoked (and maybe boated, depending on the severity of sunspots in the area) by an amphibious reptilian outside one of those cheap townhouses across the street from Kaneohe Yacht Club, Texas-inspired brisket."

Ka Honu - that would be a long label.  Could make it one line and possibly wrap it around the brisket a few times.   ;D


Recently got to try a "Authentic Texas Brisket" here in the silicon valley.  The only texas about the Brisket was in the platter name.  Though about replacing my shoe bottoms with the leather they were serving.

Keep on Smokin'

Scotty-G
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Ka Honu on October 29, 2009, 08:23:14 pm
I'm guessing pineapple with some sort of poi fish sauce slather, burying it in the ground wrapped in a pig surrounded by hot rocks.  That would be the proper base mixture under a quarter moon ...

That's one of the "secret receipts" but it only seems to work under a full moon (must be something to do with the latitude).


Wish I was there and you were here.

No comment required.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: squirtthecat on October 30, 2009, 05:01:32 am
Announcing my next smoke - the one and only "authentic, lots-of-other-peoples'-secret-receipts-mixed-together, rubbed-with-or-without-CYM-slather (depending on the phase of the moon at the time), smoked (and maybe boated, depending on the severity of sunspots in the area) by an amphibious reptilian outside one of those cheap townhouses across the street from Kaneohe Yacht Club, Texas-inspired brisket."  I'd sell it commercially but the label printing costs would be prohibitive.

Kalua Brisket.   I'd order one!

Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Brad Stab on November 01, 2009, 05:25:19 pm
Pachanga,

It's funny. I joined this site today because I received a Bradley smoker as a gift. I'm a classically trained chef with 30 years experience. Primarily in French cuisine. Although  I pride myself as being very competent on the grill "both gas and coal" I do not have a lot of experience smoking. I must tell you that your posts and recipes are great, and highly informative.Today I smoked a turkey and ribs (came out really well) but as I read through this very resourceful site I realize a whole other world of technique in cooking is out their. Brisket will be next weeks project. Thank you for sharing with us, and thanks to the members who have been very welcoming and informative.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: ArnieM on November 01, 2009, 08:13:15 pm
Hi Brad.  Nice to have you here.  I wonder how we can put classical French and smoke together?  This could be interesting.

Yep, Pachanga has a lot of info and detail and seems pretty well versed in his posts.  There seems to be something of a 'discussion' going on about brisket.  I think I'll just watch until I can get brisket on sale again.

Smoking is wonderful and addictive.  When using different woods, the smoke flavor can do wonders when compared to some sauces.  You can do chicken, for example, in pieces or split in half, in the smoker and then transfer to a grill with a glaze to finish it off.  Great taste.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on November 04, 2009, 07:36:06 am
Brad,

Welcome to the board.  There are some very informative, helpful and intelligent people on this board.

Thank you for the positive comments about my posts.

I am sorry to be so long in replying.  I have been busy on the Iron Chef Bradley event listed under General Discussions.  You may want to consider this in the future.  More competitors will add to the learning experience.

I was surprised at how well the Bradley adapts to the Authentic Barbeque cooking style. There are a lot of ways to cook brisket but I enjoy cooking from start to finish in the Bradley or other pit. Mine is certainly not the only way, but is a time proven method that employs a lot of tradition.  I enjoy the study of cooking and the history behind it. I am certain I will benefit from your knowledge and look forward to your posts.

Barbeque and Mexican (both Tex-Mex and regional Mexico styles) are some of my favorite cooking styles.  But I have hung out with a lot of Cajuns in Louisiana who have shared their secrets with me.  

Texas is a great melting pot of cooking.  There is Mexican, Cajun, Cowboy, Indian, German, Spanish and other influences as well as settlers who brought their own cooking techniques and were forced to live off the land.  We are also influenced by the great expanse of the state and its differing resources.  There is a long coastal influence which brings a lot of fresh seafood to the table.  Stock tanks (ponds) provide bass, catfish and crappie in West Texas.  And then there is beef.  My grandmothers both raised their own chickens and a hog was always being fed out.  Wildlife like deer, dove quail, turkey, pheasant, feral hogs that have bred with Russian Ridgeback, javelina, rabbit and even alligator are all plentiful.  I've cooked mountain oysters over a branding fire and enjoyed wild rabbit over an open fire on a green willow spit.  I've made crab cakes from fresh caught blue crabs and blackened fresh caught red fish a few feet from where it was reeled in.  I can attest that rattlesnake does not taste like chicken.  I relish the whole experience and the memories made.

I will continue to post about the virtues of authentic Texas barbeque in the Bradley, my methods and the methods of others.  I am working on a post concerning the Maillard reaction in the barbeque pit and the bark it produces on brisket and ribs.

Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on November 04, 2009, 07:39:02 am
West Texas Smoker,

Thank you for removing your recent post.

Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Brad Stab on November 04, 2009, 12:09:47 pm
I will be waiting for your post regarding Maillard reaction in BBQ. The reaction takes place in foods that are not primarily sugar. Like the browning of bread as it bakes, or coffee roasting. It starts with carbs and amino acids and because of the amino acid I find the flavors very complex. Look forward to your research.
Brad
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Bobbert on December 23, 2009, 08:38:06 am
Pachanga

Those look like lovely pieces of brisket great job and very informative! 

But I have one question! 

My first brisket was a wreck!!! But now I put out some very good brisket thanks to some help form WTS- but here is my question, when I finish smoking my brisket (using Mesquite) I place my briskets into foil pan and cover (boating, I think) and finish the cooking process.  This method turns out very moist brisket and have no complaints!  But it appears that you do not boat, is this true and if you don't boat how does the brisket stay moist?? (I also learned the value of the fat cap based on my first brisket (which was known as shoe leather in my house!!)

To boat or not to boat - that is the question!!

thanks for the great post!!

Smokem if you gottem!
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Pachanga on December 23, 2009, 09:30:57 am
Bobbert,

I do not boat or wrap in foil.  Many do.  If you are pleased with your results is all that matters and you may want to stick with the boating.  I recommend following several techniques without blending them.  After becoming proficient in two or three, pick the one that suits your temperament and tastes.

Slow smoking a brisket in the high moisture environment of the Bradley produces a moist brisket for me without using foil or boating.  It takes very little effort.  Replacing the little water bowl provided with a large pan is important as well as brisket placement.

I have written most of what I know about brisket in the following posts.  This works for me and produces a nice bark which is the hallmark of Texas Pit Boss Style Brisket.  It is not the only way to smoke a good brisket.

Brisket Pachanga
http://www.susanminor.org/forums/showthread.php?t=532

Photos to go with the recipe
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12061.0

Mustard Slather on Brisket and other Meats
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12112.0

I Prefer to Smoke Totally Naked - A Brisket and Ribs Manifesto
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12455.0

So your brisket doesn't fit - solution here
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=13080.0

How do you make burnt ends?
http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=13179.0

Here are a couple of recent threads that may help.  A lot of information was contributed by several members.

http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=13062.0.

http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=13206.0

Good luck and no more shoe leather,

Pachanga




Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: Bobbert on December 23, 2009, 10:01:20 am
Pachanga

Great insight, Thanks!!!

And as far as to boat or not to boat I will have to try no boating next time (with the key being the larger drip pan!)

Maybe I will do both and give the old taste test!!

Thanks and Merry Christmas!
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: SnellySmokesEm on January 28, 2010, 12:34:46 pm
Great Pictorial.  Thanks for all you advice on my Superbowl brisket.
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: seemore on January 29, 2010, 08:53:11 am
Pachanga, those look awesome!  I am a little behind on my reading, and I just opened this.......now I will have visions of smoked briskets in my head...
Mrs
Title: Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
Post by: mybad on February 02, 2018, 08:54:02 am
I don't see any reason, not to revive this thread.

Brisket has always been allusive for me. Tried many times, most, just not right. 

SO Brisket Pachanga it is.......!