BRADLEY SMOKER | "Taste the Great Outdoors"

Recipe Discussions => Rubs and Sauces => Topic started by: devo on November 04, 2011, 07:19:21 PM

Title: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: devo on November 04, 2011, 07:19:21 PM
Well no 0, Sherlock! How did you think it was made? By mustard elves under a tree?  ;D
It is really, really easy to make.
The basic idea behind making mustard is this: Grind seeds and add cool liquid. At its most basic, this is all mustard is. Both Chinese and English mustard (think Coleman’s) is nothing more than water and mustard powder. But there are some things you need to know to make great mustard.

First, you need cold liquid. What gives mustard its bite is a chemical inside the seeds reacting with cool or cold liquid. You also need to break the seeds to get at the fiery chemical — it’s like cutting an onion. Heat damages this reaction, however, so to make a hot mustard use cold water, and warm water for a more mellow mustard. Mustard sauces lose punch when long-cooked, and should always have a little extra fresh mustard tossed in at the end of cooking.

This reaction is volatile, too. Left alone, your mustard will lose its bite in a few days, or in some cases even hours. But adding an acid, most often vinegar, stops and sets the reaction in place – this is precisely what happens with horseradish as well. Adding salt not only improves the flavor, but also helps preserve the mustard, too.

Once made, mustard is nearly invulnerable to deterioration. Mustard is one of the more powerful anti-microbial plants we know of, and, considering it is mixed with vinegar and salt, it becomes a heady mix no wee beastie can survive in. It is said that mustard will never go bad, although it can dry out.

You have three choices when it comes to which variety of mustard seed you use: White, brown and black. White mustard undergoes a different, milder reaction than do brown or black mustards, which are far zingier. American yellow mustard is made with white mustard seed and turmeric, brown mustards are in most of your better mustards, and black mustard is used in hot mustards or in Indian cuisine.

The famous Grey Poupon mustard — is traditionally made with stone ground brown mustard and verjus, the tart juice of unripe grapes.

BASIC COUNTRY MUSTARD
What could be easier than making your own mustard? No, really. It is stupid easy. Grind some mustard seeds, mix with mustard powder and some liquid and you’re done. There is no earthly reason to ever buy mustard once you learn this basic recipe. Endless variations exist. Change the liquid and you change the mustard. Grind the mustard seeds a lot or a little and you change the texture — or skip the whole seeds altogether and use just mustard powder.

Which type of mustard seed do you use? Yellow is what we Americans are most used to, but brown is spicier, more mustardy. Black mustard is stronger still, and it grows wild over much of North America; gather the seeds in late summer or early fall.

Want herbs in there? Go for it. Like honey mustard? Pour some in. Want your mustard even spicier? Add chiles or freshly grated horseradish. I even made a mustard with fresh grape juice from my backyard wine grapes. I called it Deep Purple. Weird-looking but delicious.

The one caveat to making mustard at home is to wait. You cannot eat it the day you make it. Mustard needs to marinate to dissipate its bitterness. Try it: Eat a little dab right after you make it, then a day or two later. The difference is dramatic.

Makes about 1 cup.

Prep Time: 12 hours

6 tablespoons mustard seeds
1/2 cup mustard powder 
3 tablespoons vinegar (cider, white wine or sherry) 
1/2 cup white wine or water 
2 teaspoons salt 
OPTIONAL

2 tablespoons honey 
2 tablespoons grated fresh horseradish 
1/4 cup minced fresh herbs (really any kind)
 


Grind the whole mustard seeds for a few seconds in a spice or coffee grinder, or by hand with a mortar and pestle. You want them mostly whole because you are using mustard powder, too.
Pour the semi-ground seeds into a bowl and add the salt and mustard powder. If using, add one of the optional ingredients, too.
Pour in the vinegar and wine or water, then stir well. When everything is incorporated, pour into a glass jar and store in the fridge. Wait at least 12 hours before using. Mustard made this way will last several months in the fridge.

(http://honest-food.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/country-mustard.jpg)


Ancient Roman Mustard

The Romans are the first to be credited with making mustard in the way we know it today. Earlier civilizations, notably China and Egypt, used mustard seeds whole as spices.

This recipe is adapted from Apicius, and it is about 2,000 years old.

The result is a heady mustard — I used black mustard seeds, which are stronger than normal American mustard — balanced by the richness of the nuts. It’s almost like a peanut butter-mustard mix, with a little vinegar tossed in. It is excellent with roasted or cold meats.

Makes about 2 cups

1 cup black or brown mustard seeds
1/2 cup almonds, chopped
1/2 cup pine nuts, chopped
1 cup cold water
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
2-3 teaspoons salt
 

Grind the whole mustard seeds for a few seconds in a spice or coffee grinder, or by hand with a mortar and pestle. You want them mostly whole. Add the chopped nuts and grind into a paste.
Move everything to a bowl and add the salt and cold water. Mix well and let stand for 10 minutes.
Pour in the vinegar and stir well. When the vinegar is incorporated, pour into a glass jar and store in the fridge. Wait at least 24 hours before using. Mustard made this way will last several months in the fridge.
(http://honest-food.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/roman-mustard-recipe.jpg)
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: GusRobin on November 04, 2011, 07:30:26 PM
thanks - we'll give it a try
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: Wildcat on November 05, 2011, 05:51:28 AM
Wonderful post! Thanks.
Title: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: mikecorn.1 on November 05, 2011, 06:10:08 AM
I just got learned on the simplicity on making mustard :D


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Title: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: phild on November 05, 2011, 06:51:39 AM
Yes indeed!   A wonderful post.
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: ArnieM on November 05, 2011, 07:57:34 AM
Nice post devo.  Very informative.
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: chironomidaddict on November 07, 2011, 04:11:38 PM
Some great info there, Thanks for sharing it!
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: hal4uk on November 07, 2011, 05:45:48 PM
Whoda thunk?  Cool!
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: JZ on November 11, 2011, 01:33:24 PM
Great info ---- thanks.
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: iceman on November 12, 2011, 08:59:47 PM
Way cool devo. Thanks for sharing.  ;D
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: watchdog56 on January 20, 2012, 03:07:29 PM
Sounds interesting. Anybody try this yet?
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: slowpoke on January 26, 2012, 01:43:36 PM
WHAT!!No elves. ;D Thanks so very much, devo.I'll be trying these,forsure.
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: pikeman_95 on January 26, 2012, 02:15:41 PM
Great post Don
I do especially love horseradish mustard. It is great on a ss sammy. I thought I would add a little sauce that my wife makes with  Dry Mustard.

DURKIES SAUSE [DRY MUSTARD SAUSE]
First day [2 oz’s of Dry Mustard with ½ cup of white vinegar]
 2nd Day add 1/2 cup sugar to the first mixture. Beat it will and bring the mixture to a light boil in the microwave. 
Let cool and add 1 pint of Mayonnaise.

This dressing adds the kick to a Potato salad and is fantastic on cold turkey sandwiches. Keep it in mind for after Thanksgiving.
Title: Re: What do you mean you can make mustard at home
Post by: Drac on January 27, 2012, 05:57:23 AM
Thanks for sharing. 

I have a couple in a book if anyone would like.  Haven't tried them yet but this makes me wanting the give it a go.

Jim