BRADLEY SMOKER | "Taste the Great Outdoors"

Smoking Techniques => Curing => Topic started by: acords on May 25, 2006, 01:27:18 PM

Title: Canadian Bacon
Post by: acords on May 25, 2006, 01:27:18 PM
I got the urge to try something new, so I ordered a Canadian bacon season pack from Butcher Packer.  When I got it I found that it is designed to 20% pump, then brine.  I was a bit disappointed as I really wanted to dry cure.  After a few emails to the Duck Killer, and BP, I  decided to give it a try.  I used an injector that I use for Turkeys, and weighted them down with a couple of pint glasses in the stock pot.  The directions call for 24 hr brine, but as I'm not convince that I got the full 20% so I'm letting them go till Saturday morning.  I'll smoke to 160 with hickory/oak along with a rack of baby backs and give it a try.  Loin was only $1.99/LB, so if it s**ks, I'm not out much.  I'll take some pics, and post results.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: JVR on May 25, 2006, 04:06:25 PM
I've used Butcher Packer's canadian bacon kit before.  Its turns out well!
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: BigSmoker on May 25, 2006, 05:09:32 PM
Keep us posted I bet it will be just fine ;D :P.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: jaeger on May 25, 2006, 08:58:56 PM
I got the urge to try something new, so I ordered a Canadian bacon season pack from Butcher Packer.  When I got it I found that it is designed to 20% pump, then brine.  I was a bit disappointed as I really wanted to dry cure.  After a few emails to the Duck Killer, and BP, I  decided to give it a try.  I used an injector that I use for Turkeys, and weighted them down with a couple of pint glasses in the stock pot.  The directions call for 24 hr brine, but as I'm not convince that I got the full 20% so I'm letting them go till Saturday morning.  I'll smoke to 160 with hickory/oak along with a rack of baby backs and give it a try.  Loin was only $1.99/LB, so if it s**ks, I'm not out much.  I'll take some pics, and post results.

acords,
Don't forget to rinse well and soak in fresh clean water for at least 1 hour. Even without the dry cure you should rinse well and soak before you smoke it.

Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: acords on May 26, 2006, 10:01:52 AM
Will do on the soak thing, thanks!!  Should I expect a pellicle to form??
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: jaeger on May 26, 2006, 08:20:50 PM
Will do on the soak thing, thanks!!  Should I expect a pellicle to form??
Sorry, no pellica on the canadian bacon.  :)
 Just for your reference, when I smoke one 8#loin it usually takes about 4-5 hours to an I.T. of 155F. I usually cut it in half and use 2 racks.
Let us know how  it turns out!
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: acords on May 27, 2006, 01:03:42 PM
Smoked for 4 hours hickory/oak combo.  Total of 6 hrs to a temp of 160.  The seasoning from Butcher Packer was $6.00 :).  Shipping was $7.00 :( :( :(.  This will do 35lbs of meat, so total cost per lb is not to bad. Verdict YUMMMMYYY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g260/acords/presmoke2.jpg)

(http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g260/acords/intothefire.jpg)

(http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g260/acords/postsmoke.jpg)

Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: jaeger on May 27, 2006, 10:09:19 PM
Looks nice acords!!!
There are a lot of uses for canadian bacon. Just tonight my wife made a version of quesadilla with tortilla shells and canadian bacon. They were great. If you haven't tried pizza on the grill now would be a great time to give it a try.

Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Oldman on May 28, 2006, 07:07:10 AM
I got to try this one day, but I think I will T-Shirt smoke it. After smokin' it I will wrap it in plastic and give it a week's time to mellow though-out.
Olds
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: BigSmoker on May 28, 2006, 01:08:10 PM
Looks like it was a big success ;D :P.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: whitetailfan on May 29, 2006, 07:49:20 AM
Looks like a fabulous job there.
Will do on the soak thing, thanks!!  Should I expect a pellicle to form??
Definitely soak and scrub...glad you did it.  It's not really one of those things you want to learn from experience (like I did).  Better to learn from other people's over salty meat ;)
I find that there is pellicle when I do something similar for smoked pork chops.  Leave it long enough and it will get dry and tacky, I find that there is less black smudge on your loin if you wait for the pellicle.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: MallardWacker on May 29, 2006, 06:00:56 PM
acords,

Did you get much flavor from the brine???  That looks good...not bad for the first haul.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: acords on May 30, 2006, 01:07:30 PM
acords,

Did you get much flavor from the brine???  That looks good...not bad for the first haul.

Duck Dude

They tasted fabulous.  Very happy with the way they came out.  The flavor is a bit on the mild side, but another day or so in the brine may fix that.  I'm also thinking on going with straight oak too.  A couple of pieces of dark rye, some mayo and mustard-maybe some cheese.  I almost look forward going to work with that in my lunch.  Thanks for your help!!
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Biggun on May 30, 2006, 03:04:19 PM
Fine looking stuff, Acords! My last batch of HM loin, properly cured this time :-[,, came out much better. I'm looking forward to trying the BP stuff for comparison- sure looks good!
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on June 26, 2006, 03:24:23 PM
Once a year I go to a two day jazz festival and meet up with some people that I haven't seen since last year. During this time one of the things that we do is to try out do each other in the food and/or beverages we bring. Last year I brought my pastrami, which was a great hit. This year I thought I would give Canadian bacon a go. I also brought some strawberry flavored vodka, so that may have had an influenced on the group's perception of taste (not to mention the rum, tequila and wine that others brought :P).

I bought about 8.8 pounds of pork loin, and after trimming the fat I had 7.5 pounds of loin to make bacon. Using Morton's Tender Quick, I used the dry cure recipe on the Morton site with some modifications. I cut the loin in two pieces (3.5 and 4 pounds) so they would fit on the tray, and make them more manageable for curing. The bacon came out great. When it was placed on a platter with cheese, crackers, salami and pepperoni, the Canadian bacon was gone long before the salami and pepperoni. Here is what I did.

Canadian Bacon
Pork loin (cut into 3 - 4 pound sections)
1 Tbl. Morton Tender Quick per pound
1 tsp. dark brown sugar per pound
1 tsp. garlic powder per pound
1 tsp. onion powder per pound

Trim fat from pork loin, and cut into 3 to 4 pound sections. Thoroughly mix Morton Tender Quick with the other dry ingredients. Rub the entire mixture on to the loin, (When I measured the dry ingredients, I did it separately for each piece of loin, depending on the weight). Place loins into separate sealable plastic bags, and remove as much air as possible. Cure meat in the refrigerator at 36° - 40°F.  Morton states, allow to cure for 3-5 days (I cured mine for 6 days). Once a day turn meat over. You do not have to open the bags, if some liquid has formed, I gave the bag a few shakes to redistribute the liquid.  Remove loin from cure. Soak loin in cool water for 30 minutes; pat dry. Refrigerate uncovered overnight, or long enough to allow to dry and to form pellicle on the surface. You may also see an iridescent sheen on the surface. OPTIONAL: at this point I used butcher's twine and tied the loin every 3-4 inches. I just wanted it to keep a more rounded shape.

Place loins into a 200° F preheated Bradley. Apply maple smoke for two hours, and continue to cook until an internal temperature of 150° F is reached. Remove loins from smoker, and tent foil until loins are cool enough to be handled by hand. Wrap each piece tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least two days.

Cut into 1/8 inch thick slices and serve (if serving with crackers you may have to quarter each slice).

It is important to take the internal temperature of each piece of loin. I had two pieces in the smoker, and one piece took 45 minutes longer to reach 150° F. I'm not that familiar with this cut of meat. Is there more then one type of muscle in this cut?
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: jaeger on June 26, 2006, 08:41:18 PM
Great Job Hab!!!
The beauty of this recipe is that anyone that wants to try it can go to their local supermarket and pick up everything they need. You won't have to order anything online and wait for the mail.
With your detailed instructions they should have similar results and have a true smoked and cured meat. One other nice thing is that you do not have to buy an expensive piece of equipment to make this. You will have to post this recipe and instructions on the recipe site for sure!
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Oldman on June 26, 2006, 08:52:06 PM
Great Job Hab!!!
The beauty of this recipe is that anyone that wants to try it can go to their local supermarket and pick up everything they need. You won't have to order anything online and wait for the mail.
With your detailed instructions they should have similar results and have a true smoked and cured meat. One other nice thing is that you do not have to buy an expensive piece of equipment to make this. You will have to post this recipe and instructions on the recipe site for sure!

Agree 100%
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: jaeger on June 26, 2006, 09:03:01 PM
I'm not that familiar with this cut of meat. Is there more then one type of muscle in this cut?
I'll bet you are more familiar than you think. Keep in mind the size difference between pork and beef. The loin is also referred to as the backstrap (especially in big game). It starts at the (back) top of the shoulder (lower neck) and runs all the way down to the beginning of the hindquarters(rounds). The larger section is the same cut as a rib roast (prime rib). This is the section with the cap, the same as you see on a nice ribeye steak. The end that narrows is where you have your loin steak (new york/T bone/porterhouse).
The reason the loin is such a nice tender cut of meat, is the muscle runs down the middle of the back and is one of the least used muscles on the species (domestic or wild).
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on June 27, 2006, 03:17:00 AM
I'm not that familiar with this cut of meat. Is there more then one type of muscle in this cut?
I'll bet you are more familiar than you think. Keep in mind the size difference between pork and beef. The loin is also referred to as the backstrap (especially in big game). It starts at the (back) top of the shoulder (lower neck) and runs all the way down to the beginning of the hindquarters(rounds). The larger section is the same cut as a rib roast (prime rib). This is the section with the cap, the same as you see on a nice ribeye steak. The end that narrows is where you have your loin steak (new york/T bone/porterhouse).
The reason the loin is such a nice tender cut of meat, is the muscle runs down the middle of the back and is one of the least used muscles on the species (domestic or wild).

Thanks for the information. I should have included in my original post that is was the tapered end, which was the 3.5 pound piece, that took longer to cook.

I will definately post it on the recipe site. I'll put in a few more details.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Oldman on June 27, 2006, 04:58:08 AM
Quote
I will definately post it on the recipe site. I'll put in a few more details.

Oops I just remembered I got to do a couple recipes that are there...
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: jaeger on June 28, 2006, 08:52:57 PM
Habanero,
Did you have enough left to slice a few thicker to make smoked chops on the grill?
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on June 29, 2006, 02:01:23 AM
I was smart enough to only take 3 pounds with me when I met my friends. My brother took about 2 pounds yesterday, so I still have about 3 pounds left. I'll have to try your suggestion.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: acords on July 27, 2006, 06:27:45 PM
Here is my latest Canadian Bacon.  Used Cure from Morton's Curing guide.  1 Tbs MTQ and 1 Tsp sugar per LB of meat. Rubbed and let sit in the fridge for 5 days.  Soaked in cool water for about 1/2 hour.  Towel dried and let stand another 15 minutes.  Into the smoker, 4 hours maple, another 2 hrs to 160.  I wanted to tie it so it came out rounder, but I couldn't find a piece of string anywhere. 


(http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g260/acords/CanadianBacon003.jpg)


(http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g260/acords/CanadianBacon007.jpg)


Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on July 28, 2006, 03:05:49 AM
That looks good. Isn't the dry cure simple?

If you ever come across some butchers string, you should pick it up. Tying the loin not only improves the shape, but helps it cook more uniformly.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: MallardWacker on July 28, 2006, 05:42:32 AM
NICE......  

Talking about butcher string, check out Butcher-Packer, they have those nets that might work well.  I have often thought of getting those just to jazz up the appearance.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: acords on July 28, 2006, 11:01:17 AM
I like how easy this dry cure method is.  No guess work on the %'s for the brine!!!  I've got enough to last awhile, but next time I'm going to try brown sugar in the same proportions.  It is a bit on the salty side, but I knew that I should have soaked it longer.  That's what I get for doing it on a work night.  Great smoking to all!!
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on July 28, 2006, 01:23:11 PM
When I did mine I cured for six days. I soaked the cured loin in about 3-4 gallons of water for 30 minutes and it came out alright. It wasn't too salty for my taste.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Oldman on July 29, 2006, 11:47:58 AM
Quote
Talking about butcher string, check out Butcher-Packer, they have those nets that might work well.  I have often thought of getting those just to jazz up the appearance.
Hardware store non-bleached cotton string works well.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on August 04, 2006, 09:02:24 PM
I did Canadian bacon a month or two ago and compared dry-cured to wet-cured pieces of the same loin. The dry-cured piece seemed a little too "dry" compared to the brined piece, but I can't guarantee that the conditions were identical (the dry-cured piece might have been a bit smaller than the brined piece). Anyone else found that difference??
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: MallardWacker on August 05, 2006, 06:53:08 AM
Asa,

Let me ask you something...do you keep your "Dry Cure" in the fluid it gives off?  I been doing mine in ZipLok bags and do not drain them off which intern seems likes a "Wet Cure"...you see what I am saying.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on August 06, 2006, 05:17:19 PM
Asa,

Let me ask you something...do you keep your "Dry Cure" in the fluid it gives off?  I been doing mine in ZipLok bags and do not drain them off which intern seems likes a "Wet Cure"...you see what I am saying.

I see your point. Actually, I just put 'em in bags for ~7 days, and did not pour off anything from the dry cure. But as I said, take it with a grain of (curing) salt, because it was just one comparison and I can't guarantee there weren't other variables that might make a difference. I was just wondering what others might have experienced over the long run. I take it that yours are never too dry for your taste? I am going to try that maple cure the next time.

Art
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: MallardWacker on August 08, 2006, 05:27:36 AM
Asa,

I can't say if has ever been dry, the only thing I did notice once that after curing for 30+ days the meat was really too tender.  Dang I love BACON.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on August 08, 2006, 11:44:20 AM
Thanks for the encouragement and instructions MW. I plan to get another whole loin soon and follow your recipe closely. I love it too, and even more important, the Ms. loves Canadian bacon even more than I do. It has helped her adapt to having the BS settled into its little home on the front porch.

Regards,

     Art
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: blakeus on August 24, 2006, 08:54:19 PM
I just got a loin from Sam's Club and was looking for a recipe.  This bacon looks perfect.  One question, though.  How will the cure be affected if I use the FoodSaver to bag up the meat for the cure in the refridgerator?  I'm concerned that it will pull too much moisture out if I leave it for the 3-5 period.

Thanks,
Blake
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Dougsts on August 25, 2006, 03:00:31 PM
This past weekend i did three each 3 pound loins.  I prepared each of the three differently.  The first was following Habs recipe with the mortons TQ, Brown Sugar, Garlic Powder and Onion Powder.  The second one was cured using equal parts of MTQ and Brown Sugar.  Each of these dry cured loins were placed in zip lock bags and refigerated at 38 degrees F, for 8 days.  The third loin was brined in Butcher & Packers Candian Bacon Brine Mix for 5 days at he same refrigerator temp..  All three were rinsed well then soaked for about 2 hours, replacing the water twice.  I smoked with maple, following Mallard Wackers temp and timetable.  All three came out great!! Although the Brined Loin came out a bit salty,, maybe a couple days less in the brine, it is still good.  The resounding winner in the family blind taste test is the loin using Habs recipe. It is really good.  Already thinking of getting some more started, the kids seem to like to take the vacuum sealed bags of bacon home by the handful. Thanks for all the useful info folks!
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on August 26, 2006, 04:50:25 AM
Dougsts;
Glad you liked the recipe. I have some loin curing now, which I should be able to smoke on Monday. This time I used maple sugar granules, and one piece I added 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper per pound to see how that would work. What I like about this recipe is that it makes it easy to make different flavors of Canadian bacon from the same piece of pork loin.

Blakeus;
I wouldn't have the slightest idea how vacuum sealing effects curing. I was hoping that Jaeger would see your post and respond. He is the only member of this board that I know of who is both very knowledgeable in vacuum sealing and curing.

To Our Canadian Friends;
I've been doing some research on Canadian bacon, and learned that this is not what is consider Canadian bacon in your country. "Real" Canadian bacon, is usuasly not smoked or precooked, and is rolled in cornmeal. The next time I will put aside a piece of pork loin and use one it to make some Peameal bacon.

I am having a problem (because of conflicting information). Some sources state just to roll it in corn meal wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate; another states to parbake it after rolling in cornmeal just long enought to firm up the corn meal; and another stated to bake it at 350°F for 1.5 hours (which would fully cook it). Is one method preferred over the others?
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on August 31, 2006, 06:06:16 AM
Just got finished sampling the last batch of Canadian bacon, and it came out pretty good. Using the maple sugar granuals gives it a nice maple flavor. So if I have it, I will use maple sugar instead of the brown sugar. It seems that some of the maple sugar that was absorb in the meat, came to the surface in some areas, adding some "crust" here and there. The piece I added 1/2 teaspoon/lbs of cayenne pepper­; it wasn't enough pepper so I will try 1 tsp/lbs. I'm also going to reduce the internal meat temperature to 145°F, so I will be pulling it out of the smoker at ­143°F.

Before putting this batch in the smoker I cut off about a one pound piece to try my hand at making Peameal bacon. I didn't have any course ground cornmeal, so I used a fine ground and mixed in some ground black pepper and cayenne and rolled the uncooked piece in it; giving it a good coating. This morning I sliced a piece off, sprinkled more cornmeal on the top and bottom, and pan fried it. For not knowing what I was doing this came out real good. So for now own, when I make bacon from pork loin I am going to put a piece aside to make Peameal.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on September 28, 2006, 04:44:50 PM
Just thought I'd report on a successful smoke a couple of weeks ago.
My second attempt at making Canadian bacon turned out just about perfect - ie., it was definitely better than the first (above). This time, I used a combination of the recipes from MallardWacker and Habenero Smoker.

The general outline was as follows. I used a whole pork loin, cut in half (next time will cut it in thirds). I used a dry cure with equal amounts of brown sugar and the recommended amount of TenderQuick for the weight. Cured at 36-40 degrees. After 1 week, added maple syrup. At the end of 3 weeks, removed the loin pieces, rinsed them well (several changes of water, still in the plastic bags), and then added just maple syrup for several hours (could do overnight I think). Finally smoked with 7 maple pucks and then ~4 hickory (ran out of maple), then cooked to internal of 150-152. Wrapped tightly and refrigerated for a day before cutting.

The result is very good-tasting ham/CB, moderately smokey, and just very slightly sweet. I thought it was great - not at all dry this time. Next time will take the additional suggestion of garlic and onion powder. If anything, the smoking time could have been a little shorter - I don't think I'd want it any smokier. Thanks to both MallardWacker and Habenero Smoker for sharing their recipes and suggestions.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: MallardWacker on September 29, 2006, 06:11:54 AM
Man I love it when a plan comes together...What you find out is that you probably didn't make enough and don't give any to your friends or they will be handing you 15.00 and saying throw one of those in for me next time.

I am thinking of my next batch...I going with Big Smoker's suggestion of Raspberry and some sort of Pepper.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: manxman on September 29, 2006, 08:18:34 AM
Quote
I wouldn't have the slightest idea how vacuum sealing effects curing.


This "Guide to dry Curing Bacon" may be of help?

http://www.sausagemaking.org/acatalog/bacon_cures.html
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: whitetailfan on September 29, 2006, 10:53:21 AM
To Our Canadian Friends;
I've been doing some research on Canadian bacon, and learned that this is not what is consider Canadian bacon in your country. "Real" Canadian bacon, is usuasly not smoked or precooked, and is rolled in cornmeal. The next time I will put aside a piece of pork loin and use one it to make some Peameal bacon.
Hab,
I forget where it was covered off (probably the curing topic) Canadian Bacon is what you made, it is slightly different from Peameal bacon, which carries its own name.  I consider them two different items.  The peameal is cured not smoked, the Canadian bacon should be cured and smoked.

Ah who knows, make what tastes better.  I am interested to know what the peameal bacon tastes like.  It is really big thing out East, but I've never seen it around the West.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on September 29, 2006, 10:59:22 AM
Asa;
What you did sounds great. I haven't had a chance to smoke anything in the last couple of weeks, so I may try what you did. I'm thinking about mixing some habanero jelly with the maple syrup or with the maple granules.

WTF;
Thanks for the information. I did make the Peameal, sliced it, sprinkled on some more cornmeal and pan fried it. It's good bacon.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on September 29, 2006, 06:37:29 PM
Man I love it when a plan comes together...What you find out is that you probably didn't make enough and don't give any to your friends or they will be handing you 15.00 and saying throw one of those in for me next time.
Yep. I gave most of this one away (carried in a cooler on my 2 plane trips I've written about elsewhere). Need to slice some for a party next week. Then look for the next half-price loin sale at the local market.

Quote
I am thinking of my next batch...I going with Big Smoker's suggestion of Raspberry and some sort of Pepper.
I love raspberry but don't know that I'd think of it in this context. Let us know how it turns out.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on September 29, 2006, 06:42:21 PM
Asa;
What you did sounds great. I haven't had a chance to smoke anything in the last couple of weeks, so I may try what you did. I'm thinking about mixing some habanero jelly with the maple syrup or with the maple granules.
Hab -
The first time I did CB I only let it cure for 1 week. I'm intrigued by MallardWacker's technique of letting it go for 3 weeks - certainly seems to have worked for me a couple of weeks ago. If you try letting it cure longer, let us know what difference you can see, if any. I only have two experiments so far, and the longer cure seems to have been far superior to the shorter one, although I readily admit that I might have messed something else up with the first batch. Also, the habenero jelly sounds very interesting. Is that something you make yourself or buy off the shelf?
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on September 29, 2006, 07:33:45 PM
I may not cure for a longer period, but the addition of the maple syrup sounds good.

I don't make the habanero jelly, but a friend of mine does. She mainly makes a variety of jalapeno jellies, and a small batch of habanero jellies. She grows her own peppers. I haven't seen her in a while, and I need to restock. I only have one small jar left. I expected to see her at the annual Garlic Festival last weekend, but it was rainy and I didn't go. I'll try to locate her website address and post it. She used to make pickled green beans that were really good, but she stop making them because it was too time consuming.

Edited:
Asa
I found the website address, and she is no longer in business. If you google "Habanero Jelly" you will get several recipes, but she added something to her jelly that improve the flavor and I don't have any idea what it was. I may contact her and try to get her recipe(s).
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on October 01, 2006, 08:36:10 AM
Thanks Hab for the suggestion.
Perhaps I should have asked MallardWacker first about the curing time. So, MW, where did you come up with the 3 weeks? Was that by trial and error, or by suggestion in another recipe. Your observation that a longer cure affected the texture adversely, leads me to tentatively conclude that the 3 weeks cure probably produces a more tender, perhaps even jucier product than a 1 week cure. Any further thoughts about this?
Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on October 01, 2006, 09:43:18 AM
It may be do to the different types of cures being used. You and I are using Morton Tender Quick which is a fast acting cure, due to it's blend of salt, nitrates, and nitrites. My past experience is that if you cure too long with Tender Quick, your product will be a lot saltier.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on October 01, 2006, 09:42:53 PM
It may be do to the different types of cures being used. You and I are using Morton Tender Quick which is a fast acting cure, due to it's blend of salt, nitrates, and nitrites. My past experience is that if you cure too long with Tender Quick, your product will be a lot saltier.
I guess I assumed that the Butcher Packer cure would have, more or less, a similar combination of active ingredients, but with other added flavorings to give them a unique appeal. I didn't notice that my 3 week cure was too salty. I tend to like salty food, but my wife and others didn't think it was too salty either. Guess we all need to do two whole loins at a time, one by each method to compare. Good grief! What have I gotten into??
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on October 02, 2006, 03:20:59 AM
Good grief! What have I gotten into??
Look like you got yourself into a very interesting experiment :) I'm very interested in the outcome. It may change the way I do things.

I'm far from being knowledgable on this subject, but do know that cures have different concentrations of nitrites and/or nitrates. That is why one should always refer to the manufacturer's recommendations when you first use them. WRONG:Some only have nitrites, which is slower acting than nitrates.

Keep us posted.

Edited
After re-reading this I found an error in my statement. Nitrites are faster acting then nitrates.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: MallardWacker on October 02, 2006, 12:24:31 PM
Quote
I didn't notice that my 3 week cure was too salty

ASA, YOU GOTTA RINCE WELL! and I do mean really well.  When you think you have done it enough-do it again then maybe a again for good times sake.  I have NEVER had a salty product.  The saltiest stuff I ever made was with the BuckBoard stuff.  After that I learned my lesson, also how much Butcher Packer did you use???  The amount is not very much at all.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on October 02, 2006, 06:45:11 PM
MW:
I used Morton TenderQuick and did not think it was too salty after the couple of rinses that I did. My question for you (above) was where did you come up with the 3 weeks of curing time? Was that by trial and error, or by suggestion in another recipe. Your observation that a longer cure affected the texture adversely, leads me to tentatively conclude that the 3 week cure probably produces a more tender, perhaps even jucier product than a 1 week cure. My guess is that the longer cure leads to more tenderizing, based on your observations of the even longer than 3 week cure. Therefore, a 3 week cure may produce a more tender product than a 1 week cure. Any further thoughts about this?
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: winemakers on October 03, 2006, 04:44:11 AM
Has anyone ever tried injecting maple syrup pre or post curing but prior to smoking?  May be a way to pump up the maple flavor.

just a thought.

mld
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: MallardWacker on October 03, 2006, 06:57:39 AM
ASA,

The three week thing came by trial and error, what got me down this road was that I really wanted natural flavored bacon product that didn't smell like someone sprayed Maple perfume all over like what you get from the store.  My thinking was that was the longer you keep in the flavored cure the more flavor you would get.  The 28day mishap, and it really wasn't all that bad, I just noticed that the meat was REALLY tender, like some parts would just fall apart when you sliced them.  My 21 day cure time still keeps it very tender but seems to hold the meat together well.  The flavor that it yields is not over-powering, it's more like overtones with the flavor of the cured pork, to me anyway, that's what makes it good.  But when it comes to flavor, it is in the mouth of the beholder.  I am sure there are some out there that can not stand it, or there is not enough flavor for others.  All I know is that it's gone faster than I can make it.  Both the Maple and the Jalapeno.

Man of Wine,

A while back I bought some Maple Flavored Sausage, now that was months ago and I think I can still smell that over-powering fake maple smell or maybe it's still in my dreams I am not for sure but I will tell you this that real Maple is just flat out good, it doesn't have a big smell thing going on when you fry it up or open the bag, the overtone of maple really compliments the cured pork along with the smoke.  I hate talking about bacon like it is a glass of wine or something, people will really think I am off the wall...well I think that is too late for that.  I will tell you this, after the rinsing process, letting it sit at room temp sitting in maple syrup made the biggest difference in my opinion.

I will be pulling my two batches out this weekend and applying the sacred smoke to them.  ONE FREEK'N bad thing, my new Digi Cameras is busted and it's at NIKON getting fixed...

DANG I LOVE THIS STUFF>>>

(http://www.susanminor.org/users/MallardWacker/MapleSand.jpg)
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: winemakers on October 03, 2006, 07:04:23 AM
uhoh,  I sense an early lunch coming on.  And now I have to wipe drool off my desk.

mld
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: iceman on October 03, 2006, 09:01:40 AM
Dang it MW!!! Ya did it again! Posting those pictures first thing in the morning is killing me. I look like a St. Bernard here cause I'm drooling so much. MAN that looks good!!!! ;D
I just had some more of JimGuy's canadian bacon he made. I am hooked for sure. No more store bought in this house!
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: asa on October 03, 2006, 05:00:20 PM
Good lookin' sammich there MW. I took some of my Canadian bacon and salami to an office potluck today and got rave reviews. One guy even allowed as how I probably could give up my day job if I wanted to make smoked meat all the time. Come to think of it, I wonder what he really meant by that?

So, I gather from your answer that you did the longer cure for the flavor, and that you may not have any strong opinion about how, say, a 3 week cure compares to 1 week or 2 weeks as far as texture is concerned. That was one thing that I was wondering, especially since you did notice a texture difference between 3 and 4 weeks. I'm sold on what 3 weeks does for texture and taste, but was just wondering if 2 weeks would be perhaps as good.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: West Coast Kansan on October 03, 2006, 09:08:51 PM
Not just the bacon on that sandwich...cant remember the last time I had a tomato that tasted like a tomato. 
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on October 04, 2006, 03:03:40 AM
Not just the bacon on that sandwich...cant remember the last time I had a tomato that tasted like a tomato. 
In the summer time to get good tomatoes you have to find a farmers market, or stop at a road side stand. That's were all the "Great Tomatoes" go. :)
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: csakis on June 20, 2009, 11:27:43 AM
Canadian Bacon
Pork loin (cut into 3 - 4 pound sections)
1 Tbl. Morton Tender Quick per pound
1 tsp. dark brown sugar per pound
1 tsp. garlic powder per pound
1 tsp. onion powder per pound

I tried Habanero Smoker' s Canadian recipe. It is absolutely amazing. I have never really like Canadian bacon, but I got a very good deal on pork chops at the local Smiths and followed his recipe to the letter. What I found interesting that the bacon did not taste at all good taken directly from he smoker, but after 4 5 days in the fridge it just came all together. I am doin my next 8 pound batch this week. However, i am thinking using hickory instead of maple smoke.
csaba
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: La Quinta on June 20, 2009, 09:02:01 PM
We have 6lbs curing in the Hab's brew of cure right now...my husband loves it...3lbs for us and 3lbs for friends coming out on Saturday....gonna show them how to smoke....  :)
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Smokin Soon on June 20, 2009, 09:30:46 PM
I have 6 lbs in the fridge now curing. Could not find the loins I usually use from my Asian market, and am using a cut called "pork cushion" We shall see.
Title: Re: Canadian Bacon
Post by: Habanero Smoker on June 21, 2009, 01:59:31 AM
Pork cushion will work well. That comes from the picnic shoulder; which is made up of a few muscles. The longer muscle is the cushion. The meat will be a little more tougher then the loin, if necessary just slice it thinner.