BRADLEY SMOKER | "Taste the Great Outdoors"

Consumables and Accessories => Accessories => Topic started by: Scotty-G on November 10, 2007, 09:24:52 pm

Title: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Scotty-G on November 10, 2007, 09:24:52 pm
So here's the poll/question:

What style of sausage stuffer do you prefer to use and why?

I am looking for a sausage stuffer and have noticed several opinions about different types.
Can't decide between a few but here's what I am looking for:

Thank you for your vote, opinion and input
Scotty-G
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: 3rensho on November 11, 2007, 02:20:23 am
Over the years I've used grinder/stuffer combinations  :-\,  a stuffing horn  :-\ and have finally settled on a horizontal hand crank variety  ;D ;D ;D.  It's a dream compared to the others I've used.  Easy for one person to use - crank with one hand and tail off the sausage with the other.  Clean-up is simple as all parts are easily removed for washing.  I usually do 5-7 pounds at a time.  If I was going to do big batches then I'd go with a vertical to save counter space.

Tom
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Habanero Smoker on November 11, 2007, 02:35:36 am
It's hard to vote, given your criteria, because each has it strength in one or more areas you mentioned. I started with the KitchenAid stuffer attachment. But because of the small capacity, limited choices in tube sizes, and the height above the working surface I bought a 5# vertical stuffer. The vertical stuffer gave me more options, but I found it difficult to guide the sausage and operate the crank. Then I got the Dakotah 10# water stuffer. After a slight learning curve, it is very easy to use, and both hands are generally free to control the sausage. All three are easy to clean. If I had to do it over again I would have gotten the five pound water stuffer.

Since I use the water stuffer the most, I can give more input on that. Although I like it and prefer it over the vertical stuffer, there are a few cons. The biggest problem with them is if the sausage mix is too cold, it does not operate well. So if you mix sausage and like to have it set overnight in the refrigerator it is not wise to take the sausage mix directly from the refrigerator and into the stuffer. Because it has to be hooked up to a water source, it may limit your options on where you can place the stuffer. Also I find it is not that useful when making small batches, such as 3# or less. Like I said earlier, I prefer my water stuffer, I am just mentioning the cons for you to consider when you make your purchase. The vertical stuffer may have a little more versatility then the water stuffer.
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: winemakers on November 11, 2007, 05:29:12 am
I use a 5 lb vertical from Sausagemaker.com.  Great little device this one, with one exception the current model has addressed.  The newer models have an air relief valve built into the piston, venting the air trapped on top of the meat as the piston/stuffer are assembled for extrusion.  That valve is a must have in my book.  (Sidebar: being CHEAP, I drilled a 1/4 #20 hole in the piston, advance it to the top of the meat, and thread in this long cap screw I had in the garage.)

Stainless is a must, as the dishwasher does our dishes.  If non-stainless, the dishwasher detergents will likely etch sensitive metals.

I don't bother with food grade grease on the pinion gear or threaded shaft.  I use shortening sparingly, and scrub it off/replace it in the slop sink with hot soapy water every six months or so to avoid the spoilage issue. 

If money is not an object I would opt for the 10 pounder without hesitation.  My problem with sausage making is allocating the time, so when I make, I make volumes, and refilling the stuffer consumes time. 

I can't speak for the horizontals, I have never used one.  My less than perfect kitchen with limited counter space requires I stuff on the kitchen table.  10 pounds of anything less than 2" casing means a lot of lineal footage, equating to much square footage during stuffing.  Saving space with a vertical seams to make sense to my situation.  If you are blessed with kitchen acreage, this may not be a factor.

happy shopping

mld
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: 3rensho on November 11, 2007, 06:05:26 am
Yes, the pressure relief valve is a must.  I have a Trespade stuffer and it has a spring loaded valve built into the piston that lets out the trapped air.  Stainless is a must too.  I toss the cylinder in the refer when I store the sausage mix over night.  It stays ice cold all through the stuffing process.

Tom
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Mr Walleye on November 11, 2007, 08:08:59 am
Hi Scotty

I have been looking too. I didn't vote because I don't have much experience making sausage but I hope to change that soon. For some of the reasons listed above I am favoring a vertical stuffer, probably a 5 lber but I wouldn't rule out the 10.

My question for those with more experience is there are a number of 5 lb vertical stuffers available on the web for pretty good prices. I have read on other forums a lot of the less expensive units do not have metal gears. Is this a major issue? Or is it like most things in that you get what you pay for?

Mike
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: manxman on November 11, 2007, 12:02:09 pm
Quote
I have a Trespade stuffer

I agree with 3rensho and use a Italian made Trespade horizontal stuffer having tried a couple of other types.

http://www.weschenfelder.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=25&products_id=156

Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Habanero Smoker on November 11, 2007, 01:47:00 pm
Hi Scotty

I have been looking too. I didn't vote because I don't have much experience making sausage but I hope to change that soon. For some of the reasons listed above I am favoring a vertical stuffer, probably a 5 lber but I wouldn't rule out the 10.

My question for those with more experience is there are a number of 5 lb vertical stuffers available on the web for pretty good prices. I have read on other forums a lot of the less expensive units do not have metal gears. Is this a major issue? Or is it like most things in that you get what you pay for?

Mike
Mike;

It depends on what type of plastic the gears are made of. A good grade composite plastic gear will last a very long time, if not indefinitely. I have a 5 pound vertical stuffer I purchased from Gander Mountain. The model I have has plastic gears, and the gears are strong and work smoothly. I don't believe that with such a small stuffer which is manually control, you could ever exert enough pressure to ruin the gears.
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Mr Walleye on November 12, 2007, 04:48:57 am
Thanks Habs

Does anybody have any thoughts on durability and clean-ability of these ones at Grizzly or Northern Tool? They appear to e the same ones.... or is it more like... "you get what you pay for"? The Cabelas ones look good but definitely more expensive.

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200308623_200308623

http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6252

Mike
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: acords on November 12, 2007, 05:19:59 am
Quote
Thanks Habs

Does anybody have any thoughts on durability and clean-ability of these ones at Grizzly or Northern Tool? They appear to e the same ones.... or is it more like... "you get what you pay for"? The Cabelas ones look good but definitely more expensive.

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200308623_200308623

http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6252

Mike
 

I have one that is very similar, but it is made by LEM.  It works pretty well.  The big drawback is the stuffing tubes are not the "standard" size.  I had to adapt a 3/8 inch tube from my jerky cannon to fit it. 
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: winemakers on November 12, 2007, 08:55:18 am
As Habs points out, plastic isnt what it used to be.  Proper composite gears may be an advantage, potentially no lubrication needed, and that is a plus.  Less goop = less clean up. 

My vertical  5 lb'er from Sausagemaker will have a home in our house likely forever, and will outlast me, but requires hosing off, reapplication of Crisco, and occasionally smearing said shortening on my arm, shirt as I handle the critter.  Better to do without, but the engineer geek in me will not allow metal/metal contact without lube.

If you plan on making snack sticks ("slim James") style, then a small 19mm tube may be a requirement.  Just a thought.

mld
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: iceman on November 12, 2007, 12:43:48 pm
I use the 10 pounder and 5 pounder from Sausage Maker the most. Stainlees and easy to clean. I use crisco instead of the food safe grease like winemakers and clean it off each time. The 50 pound hydraulic comes out once a year if a moose happens to be in the cooler.
Just wish I had more time to play with them. ;D
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Stickbowcrafter on November 12, 2007, 11:37:47 pm
Great topic. Have not been completely happy with the stuffing feature on my LEM grinder. Does an ok job but minces most of the chunkier sausages I try to stuff. I will end up with a separate stuffer in the near future for sure.

-Brian
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Lefty_Smoker on January 21, 2008, 09:58:36 am
Does anybody know if the 5# vertical stuffers from Grizzly or Northern Tool have the air relief valve built into the piston, like the more expensive models such as those from SausageMaker, etc...  ? 
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: sherlock on January 21, 2008, 10:25:10 am
I have a 5# vertical stuffer from Grizzly. It has the air relief valve. I generally make more then 5 pounds and I wish I had gotten a 10 pound stuffer. Refilling is time consuming. The more expensive units have a quick return feature to raise the plunger back up when the load is discharged. Without that feature, it seems like it takes me forever to raidse the plunger back up to reload.
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Mr Walleye on January 21, 2008, 10:44:44 am
I gave this alot of thought too. I finally decided on the Cabelas 11 lb stuffer for the following reasons...

- Size, I felt more often then not I will usually be doing 5 to 10 lbs at a time. I did a fair amount of research an most people reported that what ever size they bought the stuffer didn't quit hold that amount. For an example alot of people said they couldn't get 5 lbs in a 5 lb stuffer.

- As Sherlock indicated having the 2 speeds, 1 down and a faster speed going up.

- A number of the cheaper 5 lb stuffers have plastic gears. Although there seems to be very few who have had trouble but some have just the same.

- I also wanted something that I would be able to get parts for in the event something broke.
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: novicestuffer on January 22, 2008, 11:47:37 am
I also have tried stuffer attachments to both manual and electric grinders, with electric being easier than manual.  I just borrowed a 5# vertical from a friend of mine, and it worked so much better, I am going to buy one soon.  The cost difference between a 5# and a larger one determined my choice because I only make sausage maybe twice a  year. 

The one I borrowed did not have an air relief valve and the gasket was worn, so before I return it I ordered a new gasket from LEMproducts.  I was also thinking of getting a new piston w/air valve for my friend but LEM representative told me I could order just the valve and drill my own hole cheaper, so that is what I did.  So, if you have one of the older stuffers without the air valve, you can order either a new piston with this in it OR order just the valve.
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: pensrock on January 22, 2008, 03:37:25 pm
It's hard for me to vote because I have only used the vertical type stuffers. I have found no reason to try another. We used to use an old 10 pound cast iron stuffer my Uncle has, I cannot tell you how many pounds of sausage has been run through that stuffer, we have used it for 40+ years and his father used it before that. A few years ago I decided to get my own so I would not have to borrow that one everytime I decided to make something. I found an old cast iron stuffer just like my Uncles but it is a 15 pounder. I just love it. We did try to use an electric grinder one time but it did not work very well.
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: NePaSmoKer on January 24, 2008, 05:57:55 pm
Have a #5 vertical, Cabelas 1hp and 1.5hp, but my favorite to use is my Dakotah water stuffer  ;D

nepas
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Jimbo on January 26, 2008, 10:11:32 am
I got the 5lb vert. stuffer from Grizzly and unpacked it yesterday to notice the plastic gear on the plunger is cracked from the top to the bottom.  So its going back.  I guess I'll have to spend some extra money and get something a little better made.
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Mr Walleye on January 26, 2008, 10:50:05 am
Jimbo

Nothing more disappointing than something like that. Yup, send her back and move on. I can't count the times that sort of thing has happened to me. Maybe it's a sign you'd be happy with a different stuffer.

After this wait (backordered) I hope my 11 lb Cabelas doesn't come damaged...  ::)

Mike
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: msao on February 03, 2008, 10:21:48 am
i also have a cabela's 11lb stuffer with motor it is great one person job and very smoth.
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: Mr Walleye on February 03, 2008, 06:40:50 pm
That's Good to hear Msao and welome to the forum. I thought about ordering  the motor from Weston. They have reconditioned ones for $139.

Mike
Title: Re: Which type of stuffer?
Post by: coyote on February 03, 2008, 10:22:46 pm
I use the 11p Cabela's vertical stuffer , without the motor........my son makes up for it. ;D
works great for us.                                     
                                                                                           Coyote