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Author Topic: Wet Brine vs Dry Brine  (Read 72 times)

Offline FuBar

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Wet Brine vs Dry Brine
« on: September 18, 2019, 05:12:34 pm »
Hi folks, I've only done a wet Brine years ago and am wondering what are the main differences (besides the obvious) between the wet and dry brine?

Will the wet brine produce a product that is more moist? Does it also ensure more even coverage since all the salmon pieces will be submerged?

Obviously this is a preference thing, but wondering what you guys think?

Thank you and happy smoking!

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Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Wet Brine vs Dry Brine
« Reply #1 on: Today at 03:07:27 am »
As you stated it is a preference. For myself, the differences vary whether you are brining fish, meat or poultry. I use wet brines mainly for fish, and poultry; though I'm looking into dry brining my next turkey - if I can get one that is not already brined. But now I recently read an article in Cook's Illustrated, that indicates that poultry that is processed by a water bath to chill it, may not benefit from wet brining. The results of their testing showed that the poultry did not gain any additional weight after brining. But the article stopped there and didn't check to see if there was an exchange of salt. The conclusion was to only purchase air chilled poultry, or dry brine a water bath chilled poultry. But I digress.

Since there are so many variable, on the type of meat, the thickness and what you are looking for in the final product, the following is for fish only. In general wet brining is faster, no matter what is being brined. I feel that a wet brined product is more moist, but the texture will be softer. Since a brine solution is balanced, it brines all sides evenly. The down side is that wet brining generally requires more refrigerator space.

If you dry brine salmon, you will get a firmer texture.


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Offline dubob

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Re: Wet Brine vs Dry Brine
« Reply #2 on: Today at 07:25:42 am »
The only thing I brine for smoking is fish.  I've been a wet brine user for about 30 years and find it works for me.  A friend of mine uses nothing but dry brine for smoking his fish and produces very good products.  I tried his method last year and didn't care for it.  I think my wet brine produces a better product for me.  As stated above, it really is a personal preference.
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 77 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

Offline FuBar

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Re: Wet Brine vs Dry Brine
« Reply #3 on: Today at 07:24:54 pm »
Thank you both for your insight. I've got a dry brined batch in the smoker now but will try wet brine next round. Cheers!

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