Author Topic: Rib Roast  (Read 10628 times)

Offline Bassman

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Rib Roast
« on: February 01, 2004, 01:56:24 pm »
Hello fellow smokers,
Yesterday I smoked a 3lb standing rib roast.As you probably already know its where we cut prime rib from. I marinated it over night in a red wine marinade,applied a salt & pepper rub with fresh rosemary just before smoking.Pre-heated and kept the smoker between 200-220 degrees F.No problem for the Bradley even though it was 10 degrees outside.I used hickory briquetts. After 3 hours the internal meat temp was 140F which was rare(not bloody). Just the way I like my prime rib.The outside got a little leathery,but the inside was moist and tender,it just melted in my mouth![:p]Not sure what to do about the outside getting tough.Anybody have any ideas.I'm thinking of wrapping it in cheese cloth next time to protect it.The 3lb roast made 4 nice steaks.

<i><font color="blue"><b>Jack</i></font id="blue"></b>
Jack

Offline Chez Bubba

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2004, 02:55:19 am »
Jack,

Just to piss off my cardioligist, I layer the top rack of the smoker with bacon. It drips down over the roast the whole cooking time, keeping it nice & moist, yet allowing a nice crust.

(To piss him off even further, the twice smoked bacon is really pretty tasty!)

http://www.chezbubba.com
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Ya think if next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non", they would mind?

Offline Bassman

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2004, 08:36:31 pm »
Thanks Kirk,thats a really good idea! I'll be trying that next time[:D]

<i><font color="blue"><b>Jack</i></font id="blue"></b>
Jack

Offline Kummok

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2004, 05:07:12 am »
Dang!! My tongue is hanging down to my knees reading this one. I just had open heart surgery two weeks ago (single bypass - Off Pump!)......I think I've healed enough to try this one!!


Kummok @ Homer, AK USA

Offline Chez Bubba

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2004, 02:39:43 am »
Down Boy, listen to the Mrs.[:)]

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http://www.brianswish.com
Ya think if next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non", they would mind?

Offline Fuzzybear

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2004, 12:02:47 am »
Yeah Kummok...I think you are relegated to the Salmon for awhile - you know, that "good" fat!!!

Wipe that drool off your chin![:D]

"A mans got to know his limitations"
Glendora, CA - USA!

Offline Kummok

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2004, 03:57:45 am »
That's not drool Fuz, that's salmon oil and as good as it is, it AIN'T bacon grease! But I'll listen to all of you and stay with the "healthy" fish fat, REGARDLESS of what PETA says about not eating Nemo cause seafood is bad for you! (see www.consumerfreedom.com)[V]

Kummok @ Homer, AK USA

Offline Chez Bubba

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2004, 10:59:50 pm »
You know, when I was harvesting our asparagus this year, I could've swore I heard tiny little screams. When are we going to stop the cruelty?![:D][:D]

http://www.chezbubba.com
http://www.brianswish.com
Ya think if next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non", they would mind?

Offline snapper39

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2004, 01:38:11 pm »
Does anyone know if there is any associated problems with smoking a very large piece of meat. I was thinking of making my first project a 12 lb  sirloin (the whole thing) I will probally leave the fat cap in tact to provide moisture for the meat when smoking. I guess what am I asking is with a piece this large does the out side dry up and get a very think bark before the interior gets up to temp?
Snapper

Offline Bassman

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2004, 03:18:40 pm »
I wouldn't be afraid to try a piece of meat that big,I think I would rub olive oil on it and then a good rub,and then do what Kirk suggested earlier in this thread,put bacon on the rack above it so it drips on it.

<i><font color="blue"><b>Jack</i></font id="blue"></b>
Jack

Offline trout

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2004, 01:15:16 am »
I have not smoked anything that large yet, but we have done prime rib in the oven before.  We cooked it in the oven for a couple hours at a little over 200F then let it rest 30 minutes and put it back in at closer to 300 for about an hour to make a crust.  These are temps that are achievable in the smoker if you don't open the door.  sirloin doesnt have the fat inside like a rib roast, but if you leave the fat side up, you should be O.k.  I have been thinking about trying this myself, so I am glad you are going to go for it.  I will be anxious to hear how it comes out.[:D]

Let your trout go and smoke a salmon instead.

Offline Regforte

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2004, 04:54:12 pm »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by snapper39</i>
<br />I guess what am I asking is with a piece this large does the out side dry up and get a very think bark before the interior gets up to temp?
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

The size of the cut, by itself, won't be a problem. I've slow cooked up to 20 pound hunks of meat (shoulder clod) and regularly cook 12 pounders (brisket). That's not to say that meat can never come out overly dry. Anything has the potential of being dried out if improperly cooked.


Offline snapper39

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2004, 09:00:51 pm »
Thanks All: I may try the bacon on the rack above or ask the butcher for a good chunk of fat to put on the upper shelf.
Has anyone ever tried injecting a big hunk of meat with one of those cajun injectors. They make them in all kinds of various flavors, (butter and herb, garlic) or straight oil. I wonder if this would help keep it moist. Just a thought.

Snapper

Offline Chez Bubba

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2004, 01:12:41 am »
I've tried the injectors with poultry and pork, not beef. IMO, the meat surrounding the injection comes out "mushy". Nothing wrong with the flavor and it does seem to help with the moisture, but the texture thing just turns me off.

What about an old-fashioned larding needle, anyone ever try that?

Then again, the second question should be, anyone know where you can buy lard?[:D]

Kirk

http://www.chezbubba.com
Ya think next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non?" they would mind?
http://www.brianswish.com
Ya think if next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non", they would mind?

Offline Richard Pearce

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2004, 02:00:16 am »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">

What about an old-fashioned larding needle, anyone ever try that?

Then again, the second question should be, anyone know where you can buy lard?[:D]
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
<font face="Comic Sans MS"></font id="Comic Sans MS"><font color="navy"></font id="navy">
I've tried all ways of using a larding needle and I have 4 different types of needle. I have no idea what our forefathers used to lard, but my experience is that as you pull the lard through the meat it simply breaks off! Lard, in my case, is any pork or beef fat that I can get to behave when I'm larding. I have finally found success by buying the fattiest bacon side that I can with the skin still on. I then carefully score the skin with my sharpest knife and then cut the lardons about 3/8ths inch deep, if you can, and come out with bootlaces of fat with skin about 6 or more inches long. These can be pulled gently through the roast with a larding needle or tong and the skin will stop them from breaking. The meat around the lardon is wonderfully succulent and pink and it is a very effective way of stopping the drying out.....'course, you've gotta be patient 'cos larding takes time!

Stouffville, Ontario, Canada.
Richard Pearce