Author Topic: Irish Bacon  (Read 16482 times)

Offline Father Tom

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2009, 09:21:27 am »
Thanks ManX

I make slab & loin bacon monthly and have many recipes.  One Irish cook book says Back Bacon is cured with spices.  I was hopeing that someone would know the spices/herbs.   Sounds like i use the same bases cure you do.  If you would like either cure you can contact me by email and i will get for  you.

Thanks again guys and i will try and get the new book over here. "Cheaper"

FT  ;D

Offline 3rensho

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2009, 11:02:04 am »
Yes, I too prefer Weschenfelder and Chris Weschenfelder is a very reasonable person to deal with.  They have always done right by me.  You're right that the products that sausagemaker carry fill a much needed gap - at least in my experience on the continent.

Tom
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Offline manxman

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2009, 11:24:30 am »
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One Irish cook book says Back Bacon is cured with spices.

Thanks for the offer Father Tom, I will email you if I need some.  :)

There seem to be quite a few variations on basic traditional cold smoked back bacon on this side of the pond and regions of Ireland no doubt have there own local variations.

I have found some English variations that use wild honey, another that uses caraway seeds and ginger and yet another dating from the 1800's that uses treacle and molasses..... but no Irish variations to date. If I turn up anything I will let you know.  :)

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I too prefer Weschenfelder and Chris Weschenfelder is a very reasonable person to deal with.


Got an email from Rob Weschenfelder re concentrations but have asked for clarification on a point, will let you know the outcome Tom.  :)

Manxman

Offline manxman

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #18 on: August 24, 2009, 06:23:16 am »
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Got an email from Rob Weschenfelder re concentrations but have asked for clarification on a point, will let you know the outcome Tom.

Hi Tom ...... had confirmation email to say there is 0.6g sodium nitrate + 0.6g sodium nitrite per 100g cure mix in Supracure. Hope this helps.  :)
Manxman

Offline FLBentRider

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2009, 10:19:19 am »
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Got an email from Rob Weschenfelder re concentrations but have asked for clarification on a point, will let you know the outcome Tom.

Hi Tom ...... had confirmation email to say there is 0.6g sodium nitrate + 0.6g sodium nitrite per 100g cure mix in Supracure. Hope this helps.  :)

That sounds like cure #2 - it has both the nitrAte and nitrIte.
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Offline manxman

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2009, 12:04:55 pm »
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That sounds like cure #2 - it has both the nitrAte and nitrIte.

That was my thought too FLB. I have just ordered some as it makes very good cold smoked back bacon.

Also ordered a brineometer ( no more floating an egg!) together with some bits and pieces to make some chorizo and black pudding.

Not sure if you have black pudding on the other side of the pond but it goes nicely with bacon and scallops, hope to make about 20lb of the stuff to an old Scottish recipe and smoke half.

Never had it smoked before....... got to be better than smoked liver though!  ;) (the worst thing I have EVER smoked!  :-[ )

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/mostof_blackpudding.shtml
Manxman

Offline Tenpoint5

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #21 on: August 24, 2009, 12:11:02 pm »
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That sounds like cure #2 - it has both the nitrAte and nitrIte.

That was my thought too FLB. I have just ordered some as it makes very good cold smoked back bacon.

Also ordered a brineometer ( no more floating an egg!) together with some bits and pieces to make some chorizo and black pudding.

Not sure if you have black pudding on the other side of the pond but it goes nicely with bacon and scallops, hope to make about 20lb of the stuff to an old Scottish recipe and smoke half.

Never had it smoked before....... got to be better than smoked liver though!  ;) (the worst thing I have EVER smoked!  :-[ )

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/mostof_blackpudding.shtml

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Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #22 on: August 24, 2009, 01:48:17 pm »
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Got an email from Rob Weschenfelder re concentrations but have asked for clarification on a point, will let you know the outcome Tom.

Hi Tom ...... had confirmation email to say there is 0.6g sodium nitrate + 0.6g sodium nitrite per 100g cure mix in Supracure. Hope this helps.  :)

That is very close to being the formula for Tender Quick which is .5% sodium nitrate and .5% sodium nitrite the rest of TQ is approximately 78% salt and 20% sugar, the other1% or so is an additive to prevent caking.


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Offline 3rensho

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #23 on: August 24, 2009, 02:15:51 pm »
Hi Manx,

Wow, thanks for the info!!!  ;D ;D  I really appreciate your efforts.  As soon as fall gets here and the sauerkraut is fermenting I'm gonna whip up a batch of salami and will use the SupraCure now that the mystery is solved.

Tom
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Offline manxman

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #24 on: August 25, 2009, 02:42:16 am »
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That is very close to being the formula for Tender Quick which is .5% sodium nitrate and .5% sodium nitrite the rest of TQ is approximately 78% salt and 20% sugar, the other1% or so is an additive to prevent caking.

That useful to know Habs.  :)

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Blood Sausage and Mustard

 Heard they were called blood sausage in Germany, quite a few European countries in particular seem to have their own versions.  :)

Manxman

Offline 3rensho

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #25 on: August 25, 2009, 04:28:09 am »
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Heard they were called blood sausage in Germany, quite a few European countries in particular seem to have their own versions. 

Yes, blood sausage is popular here and in our neighboring countries.  In Switzerland in late fall and winter we have "fresh" blood sausage (Blutwurst) available on Tuesdays - they slaughter animals on Mondays (heck of a way to start your week if you're a piggy).  That is sold in 35mm natural casings and is really squishy being composed only of fresh blood, eggs, cream and spices.  It sets up a little when you poach it.  There are also two firm varieties sold as breakfast meats.  One is blood with chunks of fat in it and the other is blood with chunks of smoked tongue.  I see lots of others in Alsace and southern Germany.  I've also enjoyed black pudding with my full English every time I get to the UK.  Never met one I didn't like.

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Offline manxman

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2009, 05:54:03 am »
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blood with chunks of smoked tongue.

Now that does sound good!

White pudding is nice too, if you are really lucky you get both on the breakfast plate!!  ;) :D
Manxman

Offline 3rensho

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2009, 08:40:26 am »
I've never even heard of white pudding.  What is in that?
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Offline manxman

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #28 on: August 25, 2009, 12:06:04 pm »
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I've never even heard of white pudding.  What is in that?

Basically black pudding without the blood!  ::)

I think it has pork meat substituted for blood in addition to the oatmeal, suet, fat and spices found in black pudding.

I have only had the Irish version which is typically eaten with breakfast but I think the Scots, some parts of northern England and some parts of Canada have their own versions. There is even a vegetarian (sorry for the bad language! >:() version by all accounts  which sounds ....... AWFUL!  ::) :-X

Ever had haggis Tom?  :)
Manxman

Offline Father Tom

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Re: Irish Bacon
« Reply #29 on: November 20, 2009, 01:03:03 pm »
Haggis!  Yes, have a lot of British friends and have been to the Queen Ball a few times and always have Haggis.  To me it's like drinking Scotch.  One must acquire a taste for it.  O well Sausage is sausage.  Sorry for the delay in getting back to you.  Hope you are not in the flooded area.  Take care.

Father Tom