Author Topic: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine  (Read 13741 times)

squirtthecat

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #30 on: October 11, 2009, 11:13:37 AM »

Squirt that 10lb turkey breast is actually only a 7lb breast injected with 32% water/broth salt and sugar. I see a lot of shrinkage when you take that out of the bag and smoke it. If you got a good deal on it who cares. If you would weigh it before and after the smoke just for 0z and giggles.

Thanks!  I will.    I used to get them all the time and cook on the grill (top rack) for the 4th of July, but then I couldn't find them anywhere..

The little 3 lb butterballs are nice, but small.   I can't find a whole boneless breast anywhere.

Offline Smokeville

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2009, 06:11:45 AM »
I really liked the overdose of fresh herbs. The 4 bunches cost about $5 in total which is 1/2 the cost of the turkey ($9.29!). And the cup of maple syrup isn't cheap either...

So, between the herbs, salt and brown sugar, maple syrup and 12 bisquettes, you had a pretty expensive turkey  ;)  But, it looked like it turned out really nice.  You just can't go out and buy one like that.  ;D

Hi ArnieM;

Yeah, not cheap, except for the turkey. It was .97c/lb which here in Canada is a really good price. It was a utility bird. A typical grade-A bird here can cost $1.99/lb or even more.

As American thanksgiving approaches the food chains in New York State will have turkeys for .39c/lb if you have a loyalty card. So we usually take a day trip and buy a few.

We learned last year there are Canada customs restrictions on how many turkeys you can bring back, We had bought 4 hotel style birds which were breast and wing only. Each was about 13lb so we get a lot of white meat. When we said to the customs guy we had 4 turkeys he said "you know you can only bring one turkey each...." So I said "but these are just half birds!" and he rolled his eyes and let us pass.

The production of turkey in Canada is controlled by a marketing board in each province which sets quota for eggs, chicks and final product. Although it is meant to protect quality, internally it works more like a commodities market where producers buy and sell their quota. So prices stay high.

Offline MAK DADDY

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #32 on: October 12, 2009, 09:38:13 AM »
Mak Daddy - whereabouts in Mexico are you going?   We were down in Mazatlan last Easter.

We are taking a cruise to Acapulco, Ixtapa and one other stop. We took the Mazatlan/Cabo cruise last year, had a great time w/ the kids. This year it's just me and the wife ;D
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NOW YOU'RE SMOKIN'

Offline ArnieM

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #33 on: October 12, 2009, 09:46:35 AM »
That's interesting Smokeville.  What a difference a few miles can make.  :-\ 

Down here, a "hotel style" is usually a breast only.  No wings or innards.  My last breast was .99/lb but came with wings and whatever they could stuff in the cavity.  We usually get a couple when we can get hotel style for .99.  I'm not sure where "hotel style" came from.

What's a 'utility' bird?  Do they pull little carts or something?  ;D ;D ??? ???
-- Arnie

Where there's smoke, there's food.

Offline Smokeville

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #34 on: October 12, 2009, 12:49:43 PM »
Down here, a "hotel style" is usually a breast only.  No wings or innards.  My last breast was .99/lb but came with wings and whatever they could stuff in the cavity.  We usually get a couple when we can get hotel style for .99.  I'm not sure where "hotel style" came from.

What's a 'utility' bird?  Do they pull little carts or something?  ;D ;D ??? ???

The wings are a big help because they give some stability so that the bird can sit upright on them. So what you get is a bird missing it's bottom half -- everything from the legs and thighs down and forward.

And, a utility bird is missing a body part - usually a wing -- or has broken or blemished skin. Or, I guess, is lopsided somehow. Probably one step up from road-kill but, hey, if the price is right...... :D

Offline ArnieM

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #35 on: October 12, 2009, 02:32:50 PM »

And, a utility bird is missing a body part - usually a wing -- or has broken or blemished skin. Or, I guess, is lopsided somehow. Probably one step up from road-kill but, hey, if the price is right...... :D

Thanks for the explanation SV.  Then, I think I've had a 'utility bird' before.  The poor thing looked like it was beat to death with a stick.  Then stabbed.  Then shot.  It must have been a frisky little critter.  ;D
-- Arnie

Where there's smoke, there's food.

Offline Ilovefishing1966

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2009, 06:27:59 AM »
Hi Smokeville Are you cooking this brine? or just dunk the turkey straight in? Also what temp are you smoking and how long? Thanks

Offline Smokeville

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #37 on: October 13, 2009, 10:26:09 AM »
Hi Smokeville Are you cooking this brine? or just dunk the turkey straight in? Also what temp are you smoking and how long? Thanks

Hi Ilovefishing1966, and welcome to the board.

With the brine, I put in 2 quarts of cold water, then all the salt, sugar, maple syrup and herbs. Then I brought it to a near boil while stirring so that the sugar and salt would dissolve and the herbs would soften and release their flavour. After a few minutes of that, I added 6 more quarts of cold water to make up 2 gallons of brine.

Once the brine is cool enough, the turkey goes in breast down and I refrigerate overnight. As Alton Brown said, "not too hot because you don't want to poach the bird."

For the smoke, 4 hours at 200-225F as the turkey was about 9lbs.

Offline ArnieM

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #38 on: October 13, 2009, 10:42:32 AM »
Hi Ilovefishing1966 and welcome.  Adding to Smokeville's post ...

The brine should be cool or cold before you stuff in the bird.  I usually cool the brine and then add a combo of water and ice.  I use pickling/canning salt because it's very fine and will dissolve readily in cold water.  Make sure the bird is totally submersed.  You might want to invert a plate on top of the bird and add a brick on top to "keep it down there".  Somehow, us smokin' people tend to use a lot of bricks.  :)
-- Arnie

Where there's smoke, there's food.

Offline OU812

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #39 on: October 14, 2009, 05:04:17 PM »
Thats a good looking turkey SV

I really like the color both inside and out


Offline Ilovefishing1966

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #40 on: October 17, 2009, 06:57:20 AM »
Thank you so much for all your help SV and Arnie Will be putting the bird in the brine very soon Is there any special chips to use or is alder ok Thanks again

Offline ArnieM

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Re: Smoked Turkey and experimental brine
« Reply #41 on: October 17, 2009, 04:02:30 PM »
I think alder would be OK.  I typically use apple, pecan or alder on poultry because they're a lighter and/or sweeter taste.

Of course the Texans would probably suggest mesquite  ;) , which is pretty strong.  I like to taste the meat with a flavor of smoke, not the other way around.

Take pictures and post them back here.  We'll be looking forward to the results.
-- Arnie

Where there's smoke, there's food.