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Author Topic: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket  (Read 25471 times)

Offline FLBentRider

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #30 on: October 27, 2009, 05:07:24 pm »
So am I smoking this fat side up?

This has been a subject of much debate...

Fat side up.
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Offline westexasmoker

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #31 on: October 27, 2009, 05:08:07 pm »
Always fat cap side up..IMO..self basting!

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Offline ArnieM

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #32 on: October 27, 2009, 05:12:07 pm »
Yep, for me, always fat side up for beef and pork, skin side up for poultry.  It is, as was said, self-basting.
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Offline HawkeyeSmokes

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #33 on: October 27, 2009, 05:26:11 pm »
Fat side up all the way here to!  ;D
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Offline classicrockgriller

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #34 on: October 27, 2009, 05:44:03 pm »
Was in Houston on Saturday and stopped at a BBQ place that had a sign "Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket". I ask the person that took my order how they cooked their brisket and she said she couldn't tell me cause it was a trade secret. I ask her how do I know it was authentic texas barbq, she said this is how we have always done it. The brisket was real good, but I was confused.

Offline ArnieM

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #35 on: October 27, 2009, 05:58:51 pm »
Was in Houston on Saturday and stopped at a BBQ place that had a sign "Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket".

I could understand a sign like that if it was in CA, MN, CT, ME, etc.  But, why would one need a sign like that in Texas?
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Offline Ka Honu

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #36 on: October 27, 2009, 06:10:17 pm »
I could understand a sign like that if it was in CA, MN, CT, ME, etc.  But, why would one need a sign like that in Texas?

If you'd tried some of the cardboard served as "brisket" in Texas these days (especially in some of the big cities - can't get away with it out in the sticks), you'd wish they had a sign and a license!

Offline classicrockgriller

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #37 on: October 27, 2009, 06:16:58 pm »
Like I said, I'm confused. I know what I like and That day it was some brisket I liked.

Offline DjSaneR

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #38 on: October 27, 2009, 06:20:33 pm »
Fatty Up it is!  :)
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Offline Savannahsmoker

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #39 on: October 27, 2009, 08:21:46 pm »
They look so good I guess I will have to try my first Brisket.  Thank You

Offline Pachanga

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #40 on: October 28, 2009, 08:05:23 am »
Quote
Posted by: westexasmoker
Insert Quote
No mustard on brisket!!...Pork yes, beef no, but to each their own....and I rarely do pork!   Grin
Quote
Posted by: JGW
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I'd have to go with WTS on this one.   Grin   Course, other than his use of Mesquite and my use of Oak....I don't think we differ much when it comes Brisket.

WTS and JGW

Thank you for your opinion on the mustard.  Even though I disagree, I respect your thoughts as well as your use of the Bradley and I appreciate your posts.  I wonder if you have ever tried mustard as a slather on brisket.  What were your objections?

I am a mustard on ham fan as a condiment but I do not use mustard as a condiment on brisket.  However, as a slather, the mustard loses its flavor in the smoking process and turns to a nice bark.  There is no residual taste that we would recognize as mustard flavor.

I recently posted a thread on mustard slather (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12112.0 )  relating the science behind mustard’s properties and their reaction with brisket.  In it I wrote, “Mustard is made of mustard flour, vinegar and other ingredients.  Science tells us that the enzymes in the mustard flour breaks down collagen that acts as connective tissue in meats.  Vinegar is an acid.  When exposed to acid collagen is softened to gelatin.  The collagen fibers exhibit swelling and retain more water. This opens the meat up to accept the flavors of the rub.  Therefore, mustard slather reacts with meat using two distinct properties; enzymes and acids.  The slather also aids in moisture retention and flavor absorption.  This produces a flavorful, moist and tender meat.  At the same time, it produces a nice crust or bark on the meat.  This stuff sounds like a miracle drug for a Q’er.” 

Despite your disparaging opinion, science and taste of the final product convince me that this is a very good addition to brisket as well as other meats. Thousands of other smokers, much more accomplished than me, consider this a staple in their arsenal for smoking brisket.  For those who have not used a mustard slather and are confused or nervous about trying it, take a lesson from some Legends of Barbeque.

Fort Worth, Texas pit boss legend Walter Jetton put on a little barbeque for 250 at the LBJ (President Johnson)  Pedernales Ranch, Texas in 1964.  Besides calling for a pit 3 foot deep, 4 feet wide and 40 feet long, his beef stock mop contained ¾ cup dry mustard and 2 quarts vinegar (sounds like mustard to me).  The meat was brisket.  Jim Goode, another Texas legend, calls for mustard in his rub and mop for brisket.  Paul Kirk, one of the most awarded Q’ers ever, devotes an entire chapter in one of his books to Mustard slathers which are used on his competition brisket, ribs and chicken. 

WTS and JGW, as you say, to each his own.  I’ll have to go with the Legends of Barbeque on this one.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga


Offline Pachanga

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #41 on: October 28, 2009, 08:13:50 am »
Saner,

I have been offline for a while: ribs and cinnamon chicken in the Bradley.  Garlic parmesan mashed potatoes, homemade Parker House Rolls, cast iron skillet fried straight neck squash, family and friends.

I am glad you purchased a packer cut brisket.  What is the poundage of your new brisket? 
You may still want to smoke the first brisket while smoking the second. 

As previously stated, fat cap up or fat cap down is the subject of much debate.

Some say fat down to keep the heat from drying the bottom out.  Some say fat side up to self baste all the way through the brisket.  Some say flip the brisket half way through for the best of both worlds. 

The answer is, everyone is right.  Cap up or cap down depends on the smoker; whether it is a vertical or horizontal, the protective heat and smoke plate, how the heat travels through the smoker, the position of the exhaust chimney, the protective rub or slather, the frequency of basting, the temperature and the amount of moisture involved. 

Mostly, in the unmodified  Bradley (no fan), I would suggest fat cap up, even though I have smoked several briskets and left the bottom brisket fat cap down because it was being basted from the brisket above while being protected from the heat below by the fat cap down. 

A person needs to know their smoker and how to use it.  In the Bradley, if I use a mustard slather or other protective coating, I generally go fat cap up due to high moisture content, low heat, adjustable heat circulation, convenience and lack of memory cells to tell me when to flip, twist or somersault (alcohol may be a contributing factor of the later).

When I say adjustable heat circulation, I am referring to a method I use in the Bradley.  If the bottom of the brisket seems to be drying, lay a piece of foil on a flipped empty basket underneath the brisket (not the rack the brisket is sitting on), blocking the middle of the rack.  If the foil tries to move around, press it between two baskets. You can also form a bowl and add water for more moisture and a further lowering of the heat directly beneath the brisket.  The direct heat will bypass the bottom of the brisket and the heat differential between the top and bottom of the brisket will lessen. You shouldn’t need this if you have the brisket on shelf two or three from the bottom but move the brisket down if necessary.  Remember, low and slow.

I have mentioned in the past loosely covering the v heat deflector with a double layer of foil and have posted a photo in my thread Authentic Texas Brisket (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12061.0).  This will help to equalize the front and rear temperatures in the Bradley.  If you do not do this, I would rotate (not flip) the brisket basket a couple of times during the smoke.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga



Offline DjSaneR

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #42 on: October 28, 2009, 08:53:43 am »
I am glad you purchased a packer cut brisket.  What is the poundage of your new brisket? 
You may still want to smoke the first brisket while smoking the second.
It's a 6lb brisket. It's only my wife, myself and our 3 year old daughter.  We'll have PLENTY of leftovers =)

 
I have mentioned in the past loosely covering the v heat deflector with a double layer of foil and have posted a photo in my thread Authentic Texas Brisket (http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=12061.0).  This will help to equalize the front and rear temperatures in the Bradley.  If you do not do this, I would rotate (not flip) the brisket basket a couple of times during the smoke.
If I decided not to cover the sheild would I still need to rotate even if I place the brisket on one of the higher racks?
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Offline Pachanga

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #43 on: October 28, 2009, 09:19:12 am »
Saner,

I would rotate.  I have monitored the temperatures in my six rack digital and there is a large differential in front and rear temperature.  It makes sense due to the location of the heating element.  Placing the brisket in a higher rack will help as the temperature evens out higher up but I would still rotate.  A chamber probe is a very useful tool and worth purchasing.  Keep the probe on the shelf of the lowest item being smoked.  Before smoking, move it around and get to know your Bradley.  You can do this in an empty Bradley or load a pan of water in it to simulate the meat before smoking. 

By the way, I keep my vent over half open nearly all the time except for preheating or trying to rapidly increase the temperature. You do not want wet smoke to condense in the cabinet and onto the brisket.

Smoking is a science and an art.  Until you know your smoker, you will need to hang around and monitor smoke, heat, rack position, water, vent etc.  Once you get a system down, you will be able to easily duplicate the results over and over while watching a football game, fooling with the dogs or sleeping.

The brisket sounds small.  Is the deckle still attached?  Is it cryovaced?  Are you going to wet age?  How about a photo if it is not too much trouble.

Hug on that 3 year old, she'll be twenty in a blink.

See you around the pit.  Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga

« Last Edit: October 28, 2009, 11:09:06 am by Pachanga »

Offline DjSaneR

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Re: Authentic Texas Barbecued Brisket
« Reply #44 on: October 28, 2009, 12:15:17 pm »
I think I like the idea of the deflector, however, I'm afraid of damaging the heating unit. 

I'll try to take some pictures of the brisket tonight.
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