Author Topic: Boston Butt  (Read 10119 times)

Offline Oldman

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2005, 11:09:09 PM »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Guess that happens as you age, huh?<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">Down boy down... You just hit 40 and while it might seem like a long time before you get to my age it is only a bump in the road until you are there.

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Offline BigCountry

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2005, 02:59:17 AM »
[8D] I just wanted to drop everyone a line to let you know that the Boston Butt turned out AWSOME.  Thanks for all the info.  I smoked a couple of chickens the next day and they were better than any beer butt chicken out there. Thanks again to all and Keep Smoking.

Offline ChefBill

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2005, 12:45:13 PM »
Geeze, 40, that's ancient history. [:(!] I can't even remember 50. I think that was around the time Noah was building the arc. Bill

If you can eat it, you can smoke it.
If you can eat it, Then You can smoke it

Offline Oldman

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2005, 04:55:32 PM »
SmokinMoe you have come a long ways since the first days of November... Proud for you! [:)] <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Geeze, 40, that's ancient history. [:(!] I can't even remember 50. I think that was around the time Noah was building the arc. Bill
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">Really? Well I remember shooting Raptors as a boy~~so

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Offline Baldrick615

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2005, 09:04:56 PM »
Do you guys get much of a "smoke ring" with the BS?  I get the flavor (the most important thing), but I don't seem to get much of the traditional pink smoke ring on the butt even when smoked for 4 hours, and cooked for 12 hours or so.  Any ideas?

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Chez Bubba</i>
<br />Well look at this! I remember back when Moe was <b>asking</b> all the questions, and now she's the answer gal![:)]

She's definately done her fair share of reading the forum & hands-on testing. Way to go Moe![8D]

Kirk

http://www.chezbubba.com
Ya think next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non?" they would mind?
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Offline jaeger

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2005, 04:38:44 AM »
baldrick,
You probably won't get much of a smoke ring with the B.S.
My understanding is that with traditional wood or charcoal, nitrites are put off through the heat of the coals/wood. With the B.S., the wood is pushed into the water before it gets a chance to reach this point.
If you want a smoke ring, apply Mortens Tenderquick to the outside of the meat, rinse off after a couple of hours and then apply your normal rub or normal prep. As long as you rinse off well, the tenderquick should not affect the taste, and will give you a smoke ring effect.









<font size="4"><b>Doug</b></font id="size4">

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #21 on: June 07, 2005, 09:06:36 AM »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Baldrick615</i>
<br />Do you guys get much of a "smoke ring" with the BS?  I get the flavor (the most important thing), but I don't seem to get much of the traditional pink smoke ring on the butt even when smoked for 4 hours, and cooked for 12 hours or so.  Any ideas?
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
I am reposting this (copied from another post). "Smoke ring" or "pink ring", occurs when you barbeque meat (cooking low and slow).

<font color="green"><center>According to Harold McGee, food chemist; "you can only get a "smoke ring" by cooking over organic fuel such as wood, charcoal and/or gas. Burning of these types of fuel produces trace amounts of nitrogen dioxide. When it comes in contact with the meat surface it dissolves and eventually converts to nitric oxide, which react to the pigment in the meat to form a "pink ring". This can penetrate to a depth of 8-10 mm."

Although you are producing smoke in the BS, I am not sure the wood is burning hot enough to produce traces on nitrogen dioxide, or in the amount that would be needed to create a "smoke ring."</center></font id="green">
The smoke ring is not an indication of how deep the smoke flavor has penetrated. It is only important in some barbeque judging competitions. It has nothing to do with flavor, but it is an indication that the meat was barbequed properly. I would not create an artifical one, unless you have a resturant and that is what your customers expect from smoked meat.


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline BigSmoker

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2005, 06:25:29 PM »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Habanero Smoker</i>
<br /><blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Baldrick615</i>
<br />Do you guys get much of a "smoke ring" with the BS?  I get the flavor (the most important thing), but I don't seem to get much of the traditional pink smoke ring on the butt even when smoked for 4 hours, and cooked for 12 hours or so.  Any ideas?
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
I am reposting this (copied from another post). "Smoke ring" or "pink ring", occurs when you barbeque meat (cooking low and slow).

<font color="green"><center>According to Harold McGee, food chemist; "you can only get a "smoke ring" by cooking over organic fuel such as wood, charcoal and/or gas. Burning of these types of fuel produces trace amounts of nitrogen dioxide. When it comes in contact with the meat surface it dissolves and eventually converts to nitric oxide, which react to the pigment in the meat to form a "pink ring". This can penetrate to a depth of 8-10 mm."

Although you are producing smoke in the BS, I am not sure the wood is burning hot enough to produce traces on nitrogen dioxide, or in the amount that would be needed to create a "smoke ring."</center></font id="green">
The smoke ring is not an indication of how deep the smoke flavor has penetrated. It is only important in some barbeque judging competitions. It has nothing to do with flavor, but it is an indication that the meat was barbequed properly. I would not create an artifical one, unless you have a resturant and that is what your customers expect from smoked meat.
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Excellent posting[;)]

Jeff



Some say BBQ is in your blood, if thats true my blood must be BBQ sauce.
Some people say BBQ is in the blood, if thats true my blood must be BBQ sauce.

Offline Phone Guy

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #23 on: June 08, 2005, 06:28:09 PM »
After reading this I called my Wife and asked her to start defrosting the boston butt for smokin later this week. I'm going to try the slaw from S&S. Do you put Q sauce on the pulled pork then slaw? Man I can't wait.

Offline tsquared

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #24 on: June 09, 2005, 02:05:27 AM »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Do you put Q sauce on the pulled pork then slaw? Man I can't wait.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote"> I thinks it's a personal preference. Some people don't even put the slaw on but I love the crunch. I put the slaw on then drizzle the sauce on top....arghh...must eat...Q!
Tom

Offline Chez Bubba

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #25 on: June 09, 2005, 03:44:18 AM »
Personally, I prefer the slaw on the side, but it is a WONDERFUL accompaniment to pulled pork. I am not a sauce fan, other than S&S' Vaunted Vinegar. If ya dry rubbed it right, no sauce needed![8D]

You see, I live in a state where people think they can cook something any way they choose, slather it with $0.99 per bottle sauce & call it BBQ. Indiana is barbeclueless![:(]

Kirk

http://www.chezbubba.com
Ya think next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non?" they would mind?
http://www.brianswish.com
Ya think if next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non", they would mind?

Offline MWS

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #26 on: June 09, 2005, 04:04:05 AM »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Chez Bubba</i>
<br />I am not a sauce fan, other than S&S' Vaunted Vinegar. If ya dry rubbed it right, no sauce needed![8D]

<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

I agree with Kirk (although I love the slaw on top in the bun), no sauce other than Vaunted Vinegar. Mostly I just rely on a good dry rub. And that goes for ribs, brisket etc....

<i><font color="green"><b>Mike </i></font id="green"></b>

<i><font color="black">"Men like to barbecue, men will cook if danger is involved".</i></font id="black">
 -John Wayne

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Offline Baldrick615

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Re: Boston Butt
« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2005, 08:29:40 PM »
Thanks!  Great info!  I agree the smoke flavor is there, and that's the most important.  I was just wondering if the was a technique to producing the smoke ring.  I don't want a chemically induced ring though.  Thanks for the info!


<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Habanero Smoker</i>
<br /><blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Baldrick615</i>
<br />Do you guys get much of a "smoke ring" with the BS?  I get the flavor (the most important thing), but I don't seem to get much of the traditional pink smoke ring on the butt even when smoked for 4 hours, and cooked for 12 hours or so.  Any ideas?
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
I am reposting this (copied from another post). "Smoke ring" or "pink ring", occurs when you barbeque meat (cooking low and slow).

<font color="green"><center>According to Harold McGee, food chemist; "you can only get a "smoke ring" by cooking over organic fuel such as wood, charcoal and/or gas. Burning of these types of fuel produces trace amounts of nitrogen dioxide. When it comes in contact with the meat surface it dissolves and eventually converts to nitric oxide, which react to the pigment in the meat to form a "pink ring". This can penetrate to a depth of 8-10 mm."

Although you are producing smoke in the BS, I am not sure the wood is burning hot enough to produce traces on nitrogen dioxide, or in the amount that would be needed to create a "smoke ring."</center></font id="green">
The smoke ring is not an indication of how deep the smoke flavor has penetrated. It is only important in some barbeque judging competitions. It has nothing to do with flavor, but it is an indication that the meat was barbequed properly. I would not create an artifical one, unless you have a resturant and that is what your customers expect from smoked meat.
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">