Author Topic: Sockeye salmon "season"?  (Read 10881 times)

Offline Quarlow

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2010, 07:31:55 AM »
they got to get their salmon somehow. They probably fill it with water just to make sure it's over weight so they can take it. Just kidding.
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Offline seaeagle2

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2010, 04:19:29 PM »
 

   My sister lives in Edmonds, WA just north of Seattle...  so next time I'm there visiting her, (which should be this summer) I'll check it out!

Too bad you weren't here in Edmonds the last couple weeks of August,  there were about 3 Million pinks out in front of Edmonds,  they run in odd years, I've still got about 15 in the freezer waiting to use in my new bradley  And for those who don't care for Pinks, on my best day, I got 2 Pinks, 2 coho, had to release a 22" chinook, and the guy I took out got one coho, and at the end of the day, we lost another coho double.

 
 
« Last Edit: January 21, 2010, 04:25:40 PM by seaeagle2 »
"If people worried about the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles" Doug Larson

Offline Quarlow

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2010, 07:29:47 PM »
Ok well cleaning 1600 after catching them and most of them between 5:00pm and 10:00pm then having to finish cleaning and icing them is a whole different ball game than catching them on a rod. I would love nothing more than to spend the day catching them pinks on a fly rod. In a stream,river but most of all in the salt chuck. But that is like comparing apples and turnips.  ;D ;D :D :D
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Offline ExpatCanadian

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2010, 02:33:40 AM »
Actually, oddly enough I was on Lopez Island around that time....  but didn't go fishing!  Put a few crab pots out though!

Just had a reply from the Loki Fish Company, and they are actually willing to ship to me in the UK!  So, now just have to crunch some numbers and see what the actual cost will be.  It'll probably make most of your eyes water, but remember I'm comparing with the cost of wild-caught fish here in the UK, so I've already got a big head start!

Offline Waltz

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2010, 11:23:45 AM »
OK guys,
This is getting to be like a foreign language to us Brits, probably anyone east of Alberta and Idaho but not sure about that.  Sockeye salmon is something we buy in cans produced in Canada which has been cooked so much you can eat the bones, not necessarily a good thing!  We have salmon, either farmed or wild.  What is the difference between sockeye, pinks, coho, and them other things and, not wishing to start an argument but, which is best?
Waltz.

Offline Quarlow

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2010, 11:49:44 AM »
Well Waltz that is a loaded question with a hair trigger. So I will tip toe on this. Sockeye is one of 5 subspecies of salmon. Fresh sockeye IMHO is the best of the bunch with Coho running a very close second and neither should be put in a can. That said I buy canned sockeye often because if you have to eat canned salmon you might as well have the best. Canned pink(humpbacks) salmon (and this is just my bias. Story told elsewhere) is good for sandwiches or whatever and the best thing you could do with them. That said I have eaten BBQ'd pinks and they taste good. Coho, Sockeye and Spring(chinook,king) are the best for cooking,BBQ'ing. I worked on the fish boats for a time and I'll tell you, you cannot compare a salmon that comes out of the water and within minutes is in the oven or on the BBQ. And I have a hard time buying so called fresh fish from a market. I would much rather buy a frozen salmon because they are frozen within hours of being caught right at sea on the boats which have plate freezer systems on them. They then do a water dip on them called glazing which builds 3 or 4 layers of ice on the whole fish to protect them from freezer burn. Chum(dog salmon) are very good for smoking because they are not as thick and don't take as long to smoke, plus they take the smoke real well and they are cheap to buy. I did however smoke a Coho on my last batch(someone gave it to me) and it was the tastiest smoked salmon I ever had but I could never justifiy spending that kind of money on them for smoking. IMO it is ashame to put any salmon other than a Pink or a Chum in a can, but like I said they do it so I'll eat it.
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Offline Waltz

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #21 on: January 22, 2010, 12:17:40 PM »
Quarlow,
Thanks for the information, we only seem to have the 'atlantic salmon' here so the various varieties are a bit of a mystery.  It must be good to have so much choice.  I was aware of the hair trigger (one of the reasons for asking ;)), I think you handled it well.

Waltz

Offline Quarlow

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2010, 12:26:36 PM »
On the westcoast they (to much contraversy) farm Atlantic salmon. I tried it once and I will never eat a farm raised fish again. They actually put dye in the feed to make it look more of the same colour as Pacific salmon. I would like to see what fresh caught from the Atlantic ocean would taste like.
I like to walk threw life on the path of least resistance. But sometimes the path needs a good kick in the ass.

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Offline CB

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #23 on: January 22, 2010, 02:15:44 PM »
Actually, oddly enough I was on Lopez Island around that time....  but didn't go fishing!  Put a few crab pots out though!

Just had a reply from the Loki Fish Company, and they are actually willing to ship to me in the UK!  So, now just have to crunch some numbers and see what the actual cost will be.  It'll probably make most of your eyes water, but remember I'm comparing with the cost of wild-caught fish here in the UK, so I've already got a big head start!

Hope it works out. These are really direct from the fishermen sales...When they boat is in port, the guys are at the dock or the farmer's market to sell it. When they are fishing, family and friends take their place. Local fancy restuarant chefs wax poetically over their fish and charge big time in the restaurants for it. I just walk over to the boat and say "Hi, uh...can I have a couple sides please?"
Happy Grilling!

Offline CB

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #24 on: January 22, 2010, 02:18:36 PM »
On the westcoast they (to much contraversy) farm Atlantic salmon. I tried it once and I will never eat a farm raised fish again. They actually put dye in the feed to make it look more of the same colour as Pacific salmon. I would like to see what fresh caught from the Atlantic ocean would taste like.

I so agree about the west coast farmed salmon - I'm grateful to be living in an area where some commercial fisheries still thrive and close to Alaska with so much air traffic that it is flown fresh each day and is in local markets.

BTW - did you see this about some new ideas for farming fish?
Hiya Kummok ---

always appreciated your "farming' graphic and adhere to that. BUT did you hear about this company that is farming salmon in freshwater and has been approved by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Fish Watch program?

Aquaseed Corp. SweetSpring branded freshwater farm raised salmon gets Monterey Bay Aquarium "Best Choice"

For those of us who are not inclined to be over-the-top tree-huggers but desire to support native wild fisheries, fisherman, and the N. American fishing industry - much like non-hunters who support Ducks Unlimited - this may be a good thing.  I truly miss the days of the wild salmon in Puget Sound and the healthy fishing industry based nearby.

I've always enjoyed using farmed rainbow trout, lobster and prawns when in Hawaii...but this could be a good thing for improving fish farming while the wild stocks replenish.
Happy Grilling!

Offline Waltz

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2010, 02:59:10 PM »
Almost all the salmon we get here is farmed Atlantic, sometimes locally produced, sometimes from Norway who have a big salmon farming industry which can flood the market.  You have to pay big money to get a wild fish, as CanadianExpat said, and they are so scarce that sports fishermen on the rivers, where most of them are caught, are told they have to return any they catch to conserve the stocks, they are sometimes allowed to keep the first one only.  So if it wasn't for farmed salmon we in the UK would hardly ever taste it.  Not an ideal situation but better than no salmon at all.
It seems that, although Kummok and I and lots of other people don't agree with it, fish farming is going to be the only way of providing enough fish to meet the demand.  I realize this could be another hair trigger subject but debate is good for the mind ::).
Waltz

Offline Quarlow

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2010, 03:11:21 PM »
Sorry, I have to correct myself. I said market in my post and I should have said "grocery store". Markets tend to have fresher everything as they typically buy as much local as possible. We don't have a lot of markets around Vancouver and the ones we do have you wouldn't catch me near on a weekend. I really hate crowds and rude people.

CB I did see that about the landbased farms. Now if they could somehow feed them fresh food they would have a better quality salmon worth eating. I know I am spoiled over here but when you have eaten wild all your life your taste gets set and it's hard to change "it ain't like momma fixed it".
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Offline Kummok

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2010, 05:12:20 PM »
Always willing to try something new CB but I have my doubts about the freshwater farmed salmon...hope they wouldn't suffer the same lack of taste as freshwater shrimp??? Interesting read at that link though....especially "Richie"!  I'm a big believer in sustainable aquaculture however my taste buds always get the priority vote, with my own personal preference being that I'll go without before going inferior?!?!?

Q is right...."What's the best salmon" is like asking for the "best chili"!  :-\  My take on my own taste can be found at:http://forum.bradleysmoker.com/index.php?topic=4216.0
The only thing I'd add to those remarks is Chum salmon (carefully selected!) is also a good choice for smoking, on the dry side.


Offline Kummok

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #28 on: January 30, 2010, 01:08:36 PM »
Hiya Kummok ---

always appreciated your "farming' graphic and adhere to that. BUT did you hear about this company that is farming salmon in freshwater and has been approved by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Fish Watch program?

Aquaseed Corp. SweetSpring branded freshwater farm raised salmon gets Monterey Bay Aquarium "Best Choice"

For those of us who are not inclined to be over-the-top tree-huggers but desire to support native wild fisheries, fisherman, and the N. American fishing industry - much like non-hunters who support Ducks Unlimited - this may be a good thing.  I truly miss the days of the wild salmon in Puget Sound and the healthy fishing industry based nearby.

More info on this CB, from local commercial fisherchick/writer for local paper... (also just posted this under separate topic)

'SEAWATCH' by Cristy Fry  http://homernews.com/seawatch/
...Seafood Watch, one of the best-known sustainable seafood advisory lists, has lent its first-ever stamp of approval to a farmed salmon operation in Rochester, Wash.

The farming practices of AquaSeed corporation's SweetSpring salmon farm include raising the fish in onshore tanks, which eliminates the hazards of large-scale escapement and transference of sea lice to wild populations, and containing fish waste, as well as feeding the salmon a more mixed diet, such as poultry, rather than catching wild fish and turning them into pellets for farmed fish.

That traditional diet for farmed fish has led to some alarming news lately. Recent studies have shown that rats fed fish oil from farmed salmon developed insulin resistance, obesity and other related health issues.

In the study, adult male rats were fed for 28 days either crude or refined fish oil obtained from farmed Atlantic salmon carcasses. The crude fish oil contained the levels of Persistent Organic Pollutants that people are typically exposed to after eating the fish.

Adult rats exposed to the crude fish oil -- which contained the POPs mixture -- put on belly fat and developed insulin resistance and liver disease. The rats could not regulate fat properly. They had higher levels of cholesterol and the fatty acids triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol in their livers.

In contrast, none of these changes were seen in the rats that ate the refined fish oil without the POPs.

The production level of the Rochester fish farm, which is raising fresh-water Pacific coho salmon, is limited, but hopefully just a sign of things to come.

Sheila Bowman, senior outreach manager for Seafood Watch at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, said, "Our advice is still for 99 percent of us out there to avoid farmed salmon. This species that's coming out in Washington state is going to be very regional in its distribution and it's not something that's going to be in the (general) marketplace for at least a few years."

Cristy Fry has commercial fished in Homer since 1978. She also designs and builds gear for the industry. She currently longlines for halibut and gillnets salmon in upper Cook Inlet aboard the F/V Realist. She can be reached at realist468@gmail.com.

Offline bobktz

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Re: Sockeye salmon "season"?
« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2010, 07:00:36 PM »
Kodiak fisherman get .10$ per pound for pinks. It is a crime to pay that price.