Author Topic: Brisket Beer Chili  (Read 1887 times)

Offline Uncle Pigfat

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Brisket Beer Chili
« on: September 14, 2010, 09:36:04 PM »
I had a few lbs of leftover brisket and decided to pull the trigger on adapting my chili recipe to accommodate the smokey goodness.  The beer was a bottle and a half of Shiner Bock.  The heat was 2 jalapenos, a serrano, cayenne, liberal black pepper, chipotle powder, and a liberal shake of Dave's Insanity sauce.  Good hot stuff.  Sorry, I'm a Yankee and love beans in my chili.  My one wish was more smoke coming through.  It was there, but not where I wanted it.  Next time smoked salt will be used.  I leaned the brisket a tad, but not much at all.

served with cornbread.  Like pretty much everything I make..


by the way, taking out contacts after chopping up the peppers is a special kind of hell.  Especially when one wants to be slippery and takes a few tries.

Offline Chili Head

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Re: Brisket Beer Chili
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2010, 10:36:33 PM »
Quote
by the way, taking out contacts after chopping up the peppers is a special kind of hell

Yeah been there done that ;D

I like the way you make chili UP  ;) It has to make ya sweat  ;D

Offline Pachanga

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Re: Brisket Beer Chili
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2010, 06:02:54 AM »
I must compliment you on the brand of beer.  Not only does Shiner taste great but it is one of the finest cooking beers I have run into or stumbled over.  I did not know it was available in your part of the world.  Lone Star is known as the National Beer of Texas but Shiner may the The National dark Beer of Texas.

Shiner makes a great beer reduction glaze, works in beans, chili, and all manner of dishes.  When browning a roast, chili meat or pork for green chile stew, I always reduce a beer in the cast iron skillet at the last which puts a great glaze on the browned meat.

I put brisket in doctored pintos often (especially burnt ends) but being from Texas, it is called beans with brisket.  I can't bring myself to call it chili. ;D ;D ;D

Anyway, nice looking chow you cooked up and a nice looking crust on that cornbread.  It is obvious that you know your business.

Good luck and slow smoking,

Pachanga

Offline Uncle Pigfat

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Re: Brisket Beer Chili
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2010, 09:47:12 AM »
I used the first bottle to braise the brisket and render some of the fat down as well as get my aromatics going.  It made a fantastic base for the chili. The other half I used to get a little more fluid after adding everything else.  I loves me some Shiner.  It's surprisingly easy to find 'round these parts.  The hefeweizen is as well.  The smoked and bohemian black are special finds which is a shame because the black is delicious.  The Spoetzl Brewery knows their stuff.

Offline SnellySmokesEm

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Re: Brisket Beer Chili
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2010, 10:19:55 AM »
Chili looks great.  I have been waiting on it to cool down so I can make chili with brisket.  You said you braised you brisket so am I right to assume the brisket was uncooked before you made your chili?  I have about 3lbs smoked/cooked brisket point frozen which is what I was planning on using for my chili.
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Offline Uncle Pigfat

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Re: Brisket Beer Chili
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2010, 02:31:22 PM »
It was cooked, but had been vac packed and frozen for a while.  I just braised it to soften it back up and render the fat (i didn't trim much and there was a lot).  It was a great way to reduce the beer and make a nice thick meaty smokey base liquid before adding everything else.