Author Topic: Anyone try Cheesecloth?  (Read 10210 times)

Offline whitetailfan

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Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« on: March 30, 2004, 05:27:42 pm »
Has anyone ever used cheesecloth in their smoking[?]

For jerky and salmon and most other things, I am very happy with the Bradley.  However, the pork loin I did for smoked pork chops is quite black on the outside, and I am looking for a way to get a cleaner look.[8)]

I was wondering if I wrapped a meat product in cheesecloth if it would keep the blackness of the smoke off the meat, while still allowing penetration of the smoke flavour.  The pros have to do it somehow[?][?][?]

Thanks for the input,
Whitetail[:)]

John - Lethbridge, AB
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Offline Cold Smoke

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2004, 06:22:39 pm »
WF- see Olds post in the Meat deparment.(I'm not sure how to copy it here for you). Interesting use of an old Tshirt. I believe it addresses your concern.

Cold Smoke

Offline Bassman

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2004, 09:03:51 pm »
WF, I personally have never used cheesecloth, but I know a guy who has,and he swears by it for holding in moisture,protecting the outside of the meat & allowing smoke in.I wouldn't hesitate to use cheesecloth but just haven't had a need to yet.
Concerning your pork loin,did your smoker get too hot?

<i><font color="blue"><b>Jack</i></font id="blue"></b>
Jack

Offline Oldman

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2004, 11:23:18 pm »
I have used cheese cloth many times. Just don't wrap it like it is an Ace-bandage around your wrist! Make sure that 1/2 way through smoking time you turn your chops over.

Now I have a ton of old white cotton T-shirts and they do as good as anything. Next unlike cheese cloth the T-shirts can be recycled. Below is a picture of the T-shirt after I washed it. (Don't use any bleach as you can smell it later--Yuck!)

Olds

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Offline trout

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2004, 12:52:07 am »
I made smoked pork chops a few weeks ago out of pork loins.  Mine were just a dark orange on the outside.  Not black at all.  I would say you probably had the temp too high.  Another consideration is did you rinse the rub off before smoking?  The rub on a pork butt is what gives you that thick dark bark on the outside.  It is the sugars and spices carmelizing on the outside.  When I made my smoked pork chops I used buckboard bacon cure.  I rinsed it and soaked the porkloins in cold water for over an hour before smoking.  Hope this helps.  By the way, just had a couple tonight.  I thawed them out and seared them on the grill quick just to reheat them.[:p]

Let your trout go and smoke a salmon instead.

Offline whitetailfan

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2004, 01:43:16 am »
Thanks guys, I had missed Olds post about the teeshirt, and I am convinced to give wrapping a try.
Bass and Trout, I had the smoker around 200-225 on the loin.  I dont know what you used Trout, but mine got really dark and I cut the outside edge off of mine when I eat it (however the wife loves that and eats my edges for me).

Also, I did a brine of Morton tenderquick and water, so it was soaked, not a dry rub.  Based on past experience, including when I did individual chops the time before and forgot to rinse[:(] I did a cold water rinse on the loins.  I did not soak them like you did for an hour, just put them under the tap for a couple of minutes - but mine was a wet cure with no stuff to really wash off.

I really do love making my own smoked chops, and the loin turned out so much better than the individual chops I made.  I have one pack left in the freezer and they will be gone before April is[:D]

Another note I forgot, I was talking to a butcher and they get their hams and loins up to 150deg I believe in order to resell it as it has to be cooked through.  I could only get 135+ out of my loin, but I'm going to buy a remote thermometer so I dont have to keep checking with a hand probe thermo...

What internal temp did you get Trout?

Whitetail[:)]

John - Lethbridge, AB
Vegetarian is an ancient aboriginal word meaning "lousy hunter"
We have enough youth...how about a fountain of smart?
Living a healthy lifestyle is simply choosing to die at the slowest possible rate.

Offline trout

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2004, 01:55:40 am »
I smoked my pork loins to an internal temp of 140F as the Buckboard bacon rub suggested.  I smoked it at 150F for an hour, then went up to 200F until it was done.  I use a remote probe thermometer, so I never opened the door.  My pork loins had been frozen for a couple months so cooking temp and tricinosis was a non factor.  I also grill or broil my smoked pork chops to reheat them, so they probably are finally cooked to a much higher temp.  What rack did you smoke your loin on Whitetail.  I used the second highest rack. Good luck[:D][:D]

Let your trout go and smoke a salmon instead.

Offline whitetailfan

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2004, 05:08:11 am »
I smoked on second high rack as well.

Could be a few things - too much smoke, or rather too tight a vent.  I'm pretty sure that I only put 2 to 2.5 hrs of smoke on, so that should have been fine, but maybe that's too much for residue.  I had always felt that if the vent were wide open that all the smoke will just rise along the meat and escape, so I keep a near shut vent.  Just enough of a crack to eliminate the backdraft through the side.

However, this past weekend I smoked salmon and some cheese and vented fully to reduce heat.  What I found was that when I opened the door, the cabinet was still very full of smoke, and that there should be no fear of lack of smoke with the vent fully opened, so I might try a half open approach in the future.  Live and learn.

As a side note, I have owned the Bradley for probably 5 or 6 weeks and smoked every weekend.  I have only cleaned the removable stuff - racks, bowl, and of course drip pan.  I clean the door seal, but have never yet been "up to my elbows" cleaning out the cabinet.  I figured that the more seasoned the cabinet, the better the job of smoking that the unit will do, but perhaps it is time to give it a good clean and re-season the cabinet - maybe that's what's causing my dark outsides[xx(]

Just for fun though, I am going to try a t-shirt or cheesecloth, because that should produce a high quality finish[:D]

We'll have to swap a batch of chops some day[;)]

Whitetail[:)]

John - Lethbridge, AB
Vegetarian is an ancient aboriginal word meaning "lousy hunter"
We have enough youth...how about a fountain of smart?
Living a healthy lifestyle is simply choosing to die at the slowest possible rate.

Offline Oldman

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2004, 03:48:44 pm »
Whitetailfan,

Here is the link to my original posting. It also has pictures. Make sure if you to wrap your meat to turn it over (that is upside down) 1/2 way through the cook. Or you will get one side too dark and the other might even be ash gray looking!

http://www.bradleysmoker.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=218

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Offline Chez Bubba

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2004, 02:43:12 am »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by whitetailfan</i>
<br />I have only cleaned the removable stuff - racks, bowl, and of course drip pan.  I clean the door seal, but have never yet been "up to my elbows" cleaning out the cabinet.  I figured that the more seasoned the cabinet, the better the job of smoking that the unit will do,<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">All correct thinking.[:)]

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">but perhaps it is time to give it a good clean and re-season the cabinet - maybe that's what's causing my dark outsides[xx(]<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">Don't do it man! That's not the cause. It's a technique issue.

Kirk

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Ya think next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non?" they would mind?
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Ya think if next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non", they would mind?

Offline Smokin Joe

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2004, 07:59:56 pm »
I use cheesecloth every time I smoke salts.  It allows the smoke to penetrate, and prevents the salt from falling through the grates.  Additionally, it keeps any stray drips from discoloring things.

I have never had a problem with the cheesecloth, but you have to make sure that you don't let it touch the sides as it does adhere over time, which can be a little tricky when pulling things out of the Bradley.

Hope this helps.

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Offline Chez Bubba

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Re: Anyone try Cheesecloth?
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2004, 03:06:37 am »
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by trout</i>
<br />It is the sugars and spices carmelizing on the outside.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Ding ding ding! If you're going to put a sugar into your dry or wet marinade, make sure it is turbinado sugar (pure cane sugar), which is the only kind that will not burn. It will withstand the long smoke.

Virtually no commercial product uses this type of sugar, so you're stuck making it yourself.

Kirk

http://www.chezbubba.com
Ya think next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non?" they would mind?
http://www.brianswish.com
Ya think if next time I check into a hotel & they ask "Smoking or Non", they would mind?