Author Topic: Fresh Ham  (Read 4757 times)

Offline Oldman

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Fresh Ham
« on: April 21, 2004, 08:31:31 am »
Anyone here do a fresh to cured / smoked ham? I'm not talking about the injecttion system. I'm talking the ole fashion way.
Olds

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Offline whitetailfan

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Re: Fresh Ham
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2004, 04:39:14 pm »
Good question Olds, I'm anxious to hear the results though I can't contribute directly here[:(].  There is one recipe in the Bradley book but it looks like over a months work.

I want to take it one step further - I'm assuming someone will come back with a brine recipe and a personal experience.  What I'd like to know is what kinds of spices are used to differentiate the curing process for Bacon vs Pork loin (chops) vs Ham.  To me in essence your are curing pork in brine in all instances - what contributes to each individual flavour[?]  The general base for all has to be salt and sodium nitrite, but they sure do not taste all the same[;)]

I felt my pork chops were a bit salty, but that should encourage me to use the Morton Tenderquik as a bacon brine base instead of complaining about the pork chops.  If a person can figure out the secret to changing the flavour of the brines, you should be able to build you own cure for all the wonderful pork products out there[:p][:p][:p]

whitetailfan
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Lethbridge, AB
Vegetarian is an ancient aboriginal word meaning "lousy hunter"
We have enough youth...how about a fountain of smart?
Living a healthy lifestyle is simply choosing to die at the slowest possible rate.

Offline whitetailfan

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Re: Fresh Ham
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2004, 06:25:11 am »
Not a lot of help on this one Olds...

Do you (or anyone) know what the proprotions are for using Prague Powder (sodium nitrite) in a brine?  I've got the Prague, but it is dangerous if you do not use in the right moderation.  The nitrite is the principal ingredient that causes the pigment change in the meat ie the pink color of ham.......

I know the amount for using as a rub, but not in a brine.  I will post the weight of prague powder per weight of meat later, I can't find it right now.

whitetailfan
"Nice Rack"
Lethbridge, AB
Vegetarian is an ancient aboriginal word meaning "lousy hunter"
We have enough youth...how about a fountain of smart?
Living a healthy lifestyle is simply choosing to die at the slowest possible rate.

Offline Oldman

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Re: Fresh Ham
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2004, 12:16:21 am »
whitetailfan,

I cannot help ya with that question. I will ask Mother where is my Grandfather's reciepe. I hope she still has it.
Olds.

EDIT: I found this link. Check it out. I think in the fall when I have more time I'm going to make a climate control shed for this.

http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/foods/458-223/458-223.html

As to the insect control it speaks about I would use Demon WP 2 oz per US Gallon applied on the outside of the shed. Not much gets past it.

Here is another link of information:
http://www.vapeanuts.com/virginia-ham-faq.html

More interesting information:
http://www.velvitoil.com/CountryHam.htm

This is from the Food Safety and Inspection Service
United States Department of Agriculture. Good information here.
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/ham.htm

This is priceless for recipes etc. Talk about cures and stuff! It got a how to make your own Corned Beef!
http://fooddownunder.com/cgi-bin/search.cgi?q=cured

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Offline whitetailfan

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Re: Fresh Ham
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2004, 04:45:11 am »
Very nice research Olds[:)]
Thanks for the help, I will continue on my conquest to get the recipes needed to produce proper brines.[}:)]  When I first bought the Bradley it was to make my own jerky, but I've only done it a couple of times.  Quite frankly it has become my main objective and goal to work out doing my own pork products.  The home made smoked pork chops and the prospects of bacon and ham are definitely at the front of my thinking these days.

Off topic on this thread, I cold smoked some nice sirloins today and will be grilling them up tomorrow.  Marinading now in Italian dressing.

Lickin' my lips in anticipation of tomorrows supper![:p]

whitetailfan
"Nice Rack"
Lethbridge, AB
Vegetarian is an ancient aboriginal word meaning "lousy hunter"
We have enough youth...how about a fountain of smart?
Living a healthy lifestyle is simply choosing to die at the slowest possible rate.

Offline ChefJeff

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Re: Fresh Ham
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2004, 04:36:54 pm »
Olds,I was checking this thread when I saw your link to down under. Great Site I never got past the Absolut Vodka & salmon I couldn't find the Salmonbut I did find the Absolut.HE<HE[:p][;)]

SMOKIN & SPOKEN

Offline Bad Flynch

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Re: Fresh Ham
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2004, 01:32:58 am »
Some number of year ago, I cured two hams with brine made from Morton's TenderQuick. I did not add any extra spices as it was a first try. The recipe for the brine came from the Morton's book that they sell (sold?) about using their curing products. I bought the hams from a local guy who butchers his own hogs, used an injector to get to the inner stuff along the bones and into the joints, and followed through with the Morton's instructions. I bought a couple of ham hanging bags for the smoking.

The hams turned out well, considering that it was a first try. I would add some spices if I were to do it again.

B.F.
B.F.

Offline Bad Flynch

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Re: Fresh Ham
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2004, 01:40:07 am »
As far as I am aware, it is not the spices that necessarily give different cuts of meat their individual flavors and textures, but the particular cut of meat. Different cuts of meat have different flavors because of the way the muscles are used while the animal is alive. While it is true that the spices might be different for a ham and a loin, the different spices probably have been worked out because of the natural differences in the meat flavors, e.g., stronger spices for more robust tasting meats and milder spices for milder meats.

In an additional note, spice mixtures might very well have developed during a time when refrigeration was not available and the spices were used to cover up off-flavors, not just to tickle a palate.

B.F.
B.F.