Author Topic: Cooked Ham  (Read 4554 times)

Offline zueth

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Cooked Ham
« on: April 02, 2012, 06:15:06 pm »
I have a already cooked ham form the store that I would like to smoke then bake.  I am thinking of cold smoking with Pecan or Maple for 6-8 hours.  Then let rest for a couple of days in the refrigerator.  Then cook until IT reaches 152 and eat.  Does that sound like a good plan?

Offline Ka Honu

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2012, 06:40:10 pm »
First, are you talking about a canned ham or a precooked shank, butt, or whole leg?  Is it already smoked?  In general, I'd say that 6-8 hours of smoke in a Bradley is probably too much, regardless of what you're starting with.  Also, depending on your oven temp, if you cook it to over 150o it'll likely start to dry out.  Why not just smoke it at about 200o with a couple hours of smoke and then let it continue to about 140-145o and eat?

Now wait for the real answers from some of the forum members who actually know what they're doing.  Then destroy this message.  I'm Jewish - what do I know about ham?
« Last Edit: April 02, 2012, 06:44:18 pm by Ka Honu »

beefmann

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2012, 07:26:52 pm »
3 to 4 hours of smoke is great and any more is a bit much in my  opinion, and  use maple comes out  quite good

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2012, 02:29:46 am »
As mentioned above, knowing what type of ham/cut, is it fully or partially cooked, is it already smoked or smoked flavor, and if it is already a spiral cut; would be helpful.

Your basic plan sounds good, but depending on whether it is fully cooked or partially cooked will determine your final internal temperature. If it is already smoked, a lot of members have double smoked a ham. I have not tried it yet, but letting the smoke mellow out for a few days is a good idea.  The amount of smoke is more than what I would, I generally use pecan for almost all pork products, and for hams only 4 hours.


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Offline zueth

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2012, 03:14:31 pm »
They are fully cooked ready to eat hams that have been smoked with Hickory already.  I have a Butt Half Ham and Shank Half Ham both are about 10lbs.



Offline zueth

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2012, 03:23:00 pm »
Seems most people say it needs to be heated to 140 IT, any ideas on why the package says 130?

I was going to mix these ingredients and apply this paste before baking in oven:
2 TBSP Dijon Mustard
2 TBSP maple syrup
2 TBSP ground black pepper
1 TBSP vegetable oil
1 TBSP cider vinegar
1 TBSP onion powder
1 TBSP paprika
2 tsp coarse salt

I would like to apply a glaze during the last hour of cooking, any good glazes I can try?

I know they say to use 18 minutes a lb as a guideline, so I should be looking at about 6 hours for these together right?

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2012, 02:18:04 am »
Are you going to double smoke it or just put it in the oven and reheat? It's early in the morning, but if it is 18 minutes per pound, and you round up to 10 pounds; that is 180 minutes or 3 hours. The following link is the glaze I have become addicted to. When I use a glaze I generally don't use a rub or paste on the ham. Scroll towards the bottom until you reach the roasting directions.
Smoked Ham

The 140°F is the USDA recommended temperature to reheat a fully cooked ham, or it used to be. I'm not sure why the instructions state 130°F. A couple of months ago I sent an email to the USDA inquiring if the new recommended internal temperatures for pork, has change the way I can prepare my homemade hams. Specifically for fully cooked hams do I still need to bring the temperature up to 152°F for it to be considered fully cooked, and would that effect the texture. I haven't received a reply. I kind of forgot about it. So it may be that they changed the recommended temperature. I'll have to follow up.


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Offline zueth

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2012, 08:45:19 am »
I was going to cold smoke for about 4 hours.  Then on Sunday put it in the oven to reheat.  They are both about 10 punds for a total of 20 lbs, so I was thinking it would double the cooking time.  Thanks for the glaze.

Offline zueth

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2012, 08:49:20 am »
For the glaze, do you just mix and apply or do you need to heat it up in a sauce pan?

Glaze Ingredients: Glaze and roasting recipe adapted from Cook's Illustrated for the Bradley Smoker.
•   3/4 C. Maple Powder Sugar
•   3/4 C. Pineapple Juice
•   1/4 C. Brown Sugar, or 1 cup if you are not using the Maple sugar
•   1/3 C Dijon Mustard
•   1/4 C. Whole Grain Mustard

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2012, 01:24:47 pm »
You don't have to heat the glaze to mix it. It may make it easier for the sugar to dissolve but it is not necessary. I do heat up what is left, to reduce it a little, and serve that at the table.

You are roasting (2) 10 pound hams, so it still should be closer to 3 hours. There may be some additional time because of the extra mass, but I wouldn't figure no more than an extra 30 minutes to an hour, if you are cooking at the 325°F that is suggested on the package. I generally take my ham out of the refrigerator 1.5 hours before I plan to put them in the oven.


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         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline zueth

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2012, 02:16:18 pm »
You don't have to heat the glaze to mix it. It may make it easier for the sugar to dissolve but it is not necessary. I do heat up what is left, to reduce it a little, and serve that at the table.

You are roasting (2) 10 pound hams, so it still should be closer to 3 hours. There may be some additional time because of the extra mass, but I wouldn't figure no more than an extra 30 minutes to an hour, if you are cooking at the 325°F that is suggested on the package. I generally take my ham out of the refrigerator 1.5 hours before I plan to put them in the oven.

Thanks for setting me straight on the time to cook and the explanation on the glaze, I will let you know how it turns out.

Offline zueth

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2012, 02:17:42 pm »
Does anybody ever roast the ham with apple cider in the bottom of the roasting pan?

Offline viper125

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2012, 05:57:05 pm »
We did our last one in cider in the pan. Then made a glaze of 1 cup  honey, 1 cup Brown sugar and mixed cider to get a good thick mixture to baste it with. Poured 1 inch of cider in pan and basted the ham with the cider for one hour. Then removed and coated thick and even with glaze mixture. Baked further repeating the glaze several times or more till it got to 140 degrees. I like the temp of 140 but really since it is fully cooked when you get it I would think it don't really matter.
A few pics from smokes....
http://photobucket.com/smokinpics
Inside setup.

Offline zueth

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Cooked Ham
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2012, 10:00:01 am »
Did you ever hear from USDA with regards to 130 or 140?

Offline TedEbear

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Re: Cooked Ham
« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2012, 11:21:14 am »
Did you ever hear from USDA with regards to 130 or 140?

It's on their website.  Scroll down the page for the recommended temp cooking chart.

Ham and Food Safety