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Author Topic: Canadian Bacon  (Read 24374 times)

Offline jaeger

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2006, 08:41:18 pm »
Great Job Hab!!!
The beauty of this recipe is that anyone that wants to try it can go to their local supermarket and pick up everything they need. You won't have to order anything online and wait for the mail.
With your detailed instructions they should have similar results and have a true smoked and cured meat. One other nice thing is that you do not have to buy an expensive piece of equipment to make this. You will have to post this recipe and instructions on the recipe site for sure!

Offline Oldman

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #16 on: June 26, 2006, 08:52:06 pm »
Great Job Hab!!!
The beauty of this recipe is that anyone that wants to try it can go to their local supermarket and pick up everything they need. You won't have to order anything online and wait for the mail.
With your detailed instructions they should have similar results and have a true smoked and cured meat. One other nice thing is that you do not have to buy an expensive piece of equipment to make this. You will have to post this recipe and instructions on the recipe site for sure!

Agree 100%

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Offline jaeger

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2006, 09:03:01 pm »
I'm not that familiar with this cut of meat. Is there more then one type of muscle in this cut?
I'll bet you are more familiar than you think. Keep in mind the size difference between pork and beef. The loin is also referred to as the backstrap (especially in big game). It starts at the (back) top of the shoulder (lower neck) and runs all the way down to the beginning of the hindquarters(rounds). The larger section is the same cut as a rib roast (prime rib). This is the section with the cap, the same as you see on a nice ribeye steak. The end that narrows is where you have your loin steak (new york/T bone/porterhouse).
The reason the loin is such a nice tender cut of meat, is the muscle runs down the middle of the back and is one of the least used muscles on the species (domestic or wild).

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2006, 03:17:00 am »
I'm not that familiar with this cut of meat. Is there more then one type of muscle in this cut?
I'll bet you are more familiar than you think. Keep in mind the size difference between pork and beef. The loin is also referred to as the backstrap (especially in big game). It starts at the (back) top of the shoulder (lower neck) and runs all the way down to the beginning of the hindquarters(rounds). The larger section is the same cut as a rib roast (prime rib). This is the section with the cap, the same as you see on a nice ribeye steak. The end that narrows is where you have your loin steak (new york/T bone/porterhouse).
The reason the loin is such a nice tender cut of meat, is the muscle runs down the middle of the back and is one of the least used muscles on the species (domestic or wild).

Thanks for the information. I should have included in my original post that is was the tapered end, which was the 3.5 pound piece, that took longer to cook.

I will definately post it on the recipe site. I'll put in a few more details.


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Offline Oldman

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2006, 04:58:08 am »
Quote
I will definately post it on the recipe site. I'll put in a few more details.

Oops I just remembered I got to do a couple recipes that are there...

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Offline jaeger

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #20 on: June 28, 2006, 08:52:57 pm »
Habanero,
Did you have enough left to slice a few thicker to make smoked chops on the grill?

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #21 on: June 29, 2006, 02:01:23 am »
I was smart enough to only take 3 pounds with me when I met my friends. My brother took about 2 pounds yesterday, so I still have about 3 pounds left. I'll have to try your suggestion.


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Offline acords

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2006, 06:27:45 pm »
Here is my latest Canadian Bacon.  Used Cure from Morton's Curing guide.  1 Tbs MTQ and 1 Tsp sugar per LB of meat. Rubbed and let sit in the fridge for 5 days.  Soaked in cool water for about 1/2 hour.  Towel dried and let stand another 15 minutes.  Into the smoker, 4 hours maple, another 2 hrs to 160.  I wanted to tie it so it came out rounder, but I couldn't find a piece of string anywhere. 








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Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2006, 03:05:49 am »
That looks good. Isn't the dry cure simple?

If you ever come across some butchers string, you should pick it up. Tying the loin not only improves the shape, but helps it cook more uniformly.


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Offline MallardWacker

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2006, 05:42:32 am »
NICE......

Talking about butcher string, check out Butcher-Packer, they have those nets that might work well.  I have often thought of getting those just to jazz up the appearance.

SmokeOn,

Mike
Perryville, Arkansas

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Offline acords

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #25 on: July 28, 2006, 11:01:17 am »
I like how easy this dry cure method is.  No guess work on the %'s for the brine!!!  I've got enough to last awhile, but next time I'm going to try brown sugar in the same proportions.  It is a bit on the salty side, but I knew that I should have soaked it longer.  That's what I get for doing it on a work night.  Great smoking to all!!
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Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2006, 01:23:11 pm »
When I did mine I cured for six days. I soaked the cured loin in about 3-4 gallons of water for 30 minutes and it came out alright. It wasn't too salty for my taste.


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Offline Oldman

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2006, 11:47:58 am »
Quote
Talking about butcher string, check out Butcher-Packer, they have those nets that might work well.  I have often thought of getting those just to jazz up the appearance.
Hardware store non-bleached cotton string works well.

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Offline asa

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2006, 09:02:24 pm »
I did Canadian bacon a month or two ago and compared dry-cured to wet-cured pieces of the same loin. The dry-cured piece seemed a little too "dry" compared to the brined piece, but I can't guarantee that the conditions were identical (the dry-cured piece might have been a bit smaller than the brined piece). Anyone else found that difference??
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Offline MallardWacker

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Re: Canadian Bacon
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2006, 06:53:08 am »
Asa,

Let me ask you something...do you keep your "Dry Cure" in the fluid it gives off?  I been doing mine in ZipLok bags and do not drain them off which intern seems likes a "Wet Cure"...you see what I am saying.

SmokeOn,

Mike
Perryville, Arkansas

It's not how much you smoke but how many friends you make while doing it...