Author Topic: Yet another thanksgiving question.  (Read 2463 times)

Offline hutcho

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Yet another thanksgiving question.
« on: November 26, 2013, 04:33:33 PM »
We normally do a turkey injected and in the deep fryer (only way I have found to keep it moist enough for our taste).  I was thinking of throwing it in the smoker for some cold smoke first, say an hour or so.  First off would it even get enough smoke to matter or would it be bettter to hot smoke for a few hours then finish in fryer? Or is this just a dumb idea and stick with what works? Thanks guys!

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Offline KyNola

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Re: Yet another thanksgiving question.
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2013, 07:56:07 PM »
Let me start by saying I have never done any of the things you are considering.  That said, I would not cold smoke poultry of any kind.  I think you could be asking for trouble.  I would hot smoke the turkey and then take it to the deep fryer to finish.

Lots of guys more experienced than me on smoking/frying turkeys will come along and give you better advice.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Offline Saber 4

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Re: Yet another thanksgiving question.
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2013, 09:24:58 PM »
For what it's worth, I haven't done it but I have read and been told by members I trust that they have hot smoked their turkey's for 2-3 hours and then gone straight into the fryer and they turn out great.

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Yet another thanksgiving question.
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2013, 01:57:35 AM »
If you can keep your smoker at room temperature or a little lower, which is considered 68 - 70°F, and you move the turkey directly from the refrigerator to the smoker, cold smoking for an hour or two will be alright - but no longer then that.

As Saber pointed out, your better option would be to use a temperature of 200 - 225°F, for 2 - 3 hours and then directly into the fryer. You will probably obtain a better smoke flavor.

Either way, if you have a wire vertical turkey roaster, I would use one of those while applying the smoke so that more smoke and enter the cavity area. Most turkey fryers come with a stand to set your turkey on. So maybe that can be used as the vertical roaster.


     I
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Offline hutcho

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Re: Yet another thanksgiving question.
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2013, 05:24:15 AM »
I figured cold smoke was a bad idea.  Think im gonna try 3-4 hrs hot smoke with hickory.  I had planned on leaving the hanger thing in the bird and sitting it on it, kinda hoping it fills the cavity with smoke and gets some more smoke in there. Actually kind of surprised no one has done this yet.  I have done it before with chicken wings with good results, so hopefully this works well too.

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Offline iceman

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Re: Yet another thanksgiving question.
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2013, 10:14:26 AM »
We always brine our turkey over night in the fridge then inject it with seasoned butter. Then off to the smoker for two hours at 225F. with apple wood. It then finishes in the big easy or deep fryer. That's the only way Miss Ann will eat poultry anymore  ;D
The bird is all natural with no solutions added.  ;)