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Author Topic: Fresh cut Brisket  (Read 1097 times)

Offline Johnny

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Fresh cut Brisket
« on: March 29, 2017, 10:37:32 am »
I was at the grocery store this morning and went in to see the butcher, he informed be he had some brisket brought in for someone. I asked if I could get a section cut off because it looked to be about 24" long or so. Any how he cut me off a fairly large size about 8-10" wide.. cost seemed really reasonable with a total of 12$ ..Is there better cuts than others on brisket? Not sure what Ive got, ill post a pic when I get home .( Mabye someone can identify)

Offline TedEbear

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2017, 10:54:10 am »
How many lbs was it?  Around here briskets are $7.29/lb, which is mainly why I do not buy them.

Offline Johnny

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2017, 11:34:22 am »
3.2 lbs TedEbear

Offline Johnny

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2017, 11:50:22 am »
photobuc

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2017, 01:27:36 pm »
A whole brisket, often referred to a packer has two distinct muscles; the point, and the flat. Most like to cook the whole brisket, but if that is unavailable, most stores will have the flat for sale. If you can't or don't want a whole brisket, the flat is preferred. The point has a lot of marbling, and many slice the point off after a whole brisket has been smoked and cooked, then make burnt ends out of it.

If your butcher just sliced a whole brisket without removing the point from the flat, you probably got some each of the point and flat. From the picture your posted, where you see that fat vein; that is where the point is separated from the flat. It's hard to tell from the picture but it looks like he gave you the point end.


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Offline Johnny

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2017, 03:58:18 pm »
A whole brisket, often referred to a packer has two distinct muscles; the point, and the flat. Most like to cook the whole brisket, but if that is unavailable, most stores will have the flat for sale. If you can't or don't want a whole brisket, the flat is preferred. The point has a lot of marbling, and many slice the point off after a whole brisket has been smoked and cooked, then make burnt ends out of it.

If your butcher just sliced a whole brisket without removing the point from the flat, you probably got some each of the point and flat. From the picture your posted, where you see that fat vein; that is where the point is separated from the flat. It's hard to tell from the picture but it looks like he gave you the point end.


Offline Johnny

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2017, 04:01:23 pm »
Took it out of the package so you can get a better look Habs, not quite sure how I'm going to cook/smoke this yet but I would like to have it for a meal. Any suggestions?

Offline Ka Honu

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2017, 05:07:42 pm »
Sure looks like he cut a slab from the point end and gave you some of each. Prep, season, and smoke as you would a whole packer (but it should only take you somewhere between 3 and 5 hours). Again, if you haven't already, read the brisket posts from Pachanga and WTS on the archived recipe board before proceeding.

To serve you can slice the whole thing (pencil thick) across the grain of the flat or separate and slice the parts individually.

At CAD 8.80/kg you paid about US$4 per pound - not too bad a price for what you got, especially as well as he trimmed it.

Offline Johnny

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2017, 05:39:15 pm »
Actually paid about $4.00 canadian funds which = $3.00 U.S per lb, think I will go buy a few more lbs to have on hand while the price is good..
Thanks for the Advice Guys!

Offline Johnny

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2017, 05:49:25 pm »
Sure looks like he cut a slab from the point end and gave you some of each. Prep, season, and smoke as you would a whole packer (but it should only take you somewhere between 3 and 5 hours). Again, if you haven't already, read the brisket posts from Pachanga and WTS on the archived recipe board before proceeding.

To serve you can slice the whole thing (pencil thick) across the grain of the flat or separate and slice the parts individually.

At CAD 8.80/kg you paid about US$4 per pound - not too bad a price for what you got, especially as well as he trimmed it.

Ka Honu how do you access the archived recipes? I looked but no luck finding it.

Offline Ka Honu

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2017, 12:04:00 am »
Archived recipes (beef) here.

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2017, 01:51:23 am »
It is difficult to tell, but if you look at that fat vein, that vein separates the two muscles. Looking at the marbling it appears that the cut below the fat vein is the point, and what's above it is part of the flat. It is pretty well trimmed; to the point too much fat has been trimmed off. Which ever recipe you choose, when the brisket reaches an internal temperature of about 160°F, I would put it in a foil pan, add about 1/2" of low sodium beef stock, cover with foil, and continue to cook until you reach the desired doness. Or you may run the risk of ending with a very dry brisket. Most competition cooks now remove almost all the fat, and they will foil the brisket at some stage, and their briskets generally will come out moist.

An alternative that some people use is to place bacon on a rack above the brisket, so the fat from the bacon drips down. That will alter the taste of the brisket, and doesn't work as well as foiling. So if you want to see what brisket tastes like, the foil pan is the best way to go at this point.


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                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline Johnny

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2017, 03:02:41 am »
It is difficult to tell, but if you look at that fat vein, that vein separates the two muscles. Looking at the marbling it appears that the cut below the fat vein is the point, and what's above it is part of the flat. It is pretty well trimmed; to the point too much fat has been trimmed off. Which ever recipe you choose, when the brisket reaches an internal temperature of about 160°F, I would put it in a foil pan, add about 1/2" of low sodium beef stock, cover with foil, and continue to cook until you reach the desired doness. Or you may run the risk of ending with a very dry brisket. Most competition cooks now remove almost all the fat, and they will foil the brisket at some stage, and their briskets generally will come out moist.

An alternative that some people use is to place bacon on a rack above the brisket, so the fat from the bacon drips down. That will alter the taste of the brisket, and doesn't work as well as foiling. So if you want to see what brisket tastes like, the foil pan is the best way to go at this point.
Couple of questions.. once it reaches 160f, place it into a foil pan with the beef stock and cover the pan with foil? Or the brisket with foil and place in the pan? Silly question I know but just want to be clear.
Also well done beef is around the 170f mark and I noticed guys are bringing the int temp up to 190f, is there a reason for that? One would assume that would run the risk of drying out.

Offline TedEbear

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2017, 04:49:18 am »
Ka Honu how do you access the archived recipes? I looked but no luck finding it.

Here's a link to the entire recipe site:  Our Time Tested and Proven Recipes


Offline Johnny

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Re: Fresh cut Brisket
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2017, 07:08:10 am »
Had to share my great deal with you guys.. I went back to the butcher this morning to ask for more brisket and he informed me the cost had went up from $8.80 per KG to over $14 per KG over night, turns out the grocery store was paying more for the brisket than they were selling it for. He said to me he would check to see if the price change had been downloaded yet and guess what! it didn't  :) I got the entire packer for a cost of $54 Canadian! its somewhere around 16- 18lbs!

Now I need advice how to cut this,, it has been trimmed already.