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Author Topic: Burnt wires  (Read 1290 times)

Offline peakeman

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Burnt wires
« on: August 20, 2017, 09:16:31 am »
Not sure if anyone else has had this problem the original smoker but I was having trouble with the heating element—it wouldn't heat up—so I swapped it out for a new one. When I tested that one it didn't heat up either. Then I found that the one of the wires at the ring connector had nearly corroded thru. I opened up the back and found that that wire was pretty burnt up at the end, and the thermoplastic on it was rock hard. Plus the insulation was pretty baked in one spot. I checked the other wire and its ring connector was just hanging on and its condition was like the other. Considering that these smokers don't get that hot (+250 degrees max on a good day. In the sun. With no wind.) and the wiring is rated for ~225 degrees, this seems rather unusual for both of them to burn out on a smoker that's just over a year and a half old.

Offline pensrock

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Re: Burnt wires
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2017, 05:36:54 am »
The temperature of the smoker most likely is not the culprit. A loose connection at one end of the wire makes more sense because a wire will get real hot if there is not a good connection. There may have been a bad crimp or the nut or screw on one end was not real tight, its hard to say at this point.

Offline Gafala

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Re: Burnt wires
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2017, 10:17:45 am »
The temperature of the smoker most likely is not the culprit. A loose connection at one end of the wire makes more sense because a wire will get real hot if there is not a good connection. There may have been a bad crimp or the nut or screw on one end was not real tight, its hard to say at this point.

I agree with that. Wire will not burn as described unless it was subjected to a much higher current then it was rated for, and I can't see a Bradley doing that.
Bradley 4 rack Digital, 900 watt, Auber PID
Bradley cold smoke adapter
Char-Griller Smoking Pro BBQ Smoker with rotisserie
Brinkman Bullet Smoker
Weber 24”
Custom Hard Cure Cabinet for Salami
One Auber Master Temp monitor and two remotes with probes, up to ten remotes can be used.

Offline peakeman

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Re: Burnt wires
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2017, 09:11:21 am »
So it was likely a problem because of how it was first assembled?  There was some green corrosion on the wires, too, I assume from excess humidity in the chamber even tho' Bradley provides a bowl for water

Offline TedEbear

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Re: Burnt wires
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2017, 04:28:16 am »
Excess humidity in the cooking chamber can be caused by the top vent being closed or not open far enough.  Was that ever the case with yours?

Offline Loopy

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Re: Burnt wires
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2018, 02:56:40 pm »
I have been using it for over 4 years on a regular basis, without any of the concerns people have had with element or other issues. However, I was smoking a brisket and went to check on it and found there was a large amount of smoke coming from my original 4 rack smoker. Opening the door I was shocked to see a massive flame.  I immediately shut the door and unplugged it.  The flame died out relatively quickly after unplugging.  I did save the brisket, but was having problem getting the heating element to heat up.  I did some reading and thought I would check the inline fuse before buying a new element.  Opening up the tower I was surprised to find my smoker had obviously had a major meltdown. I have pictures but don't know how to add them.  I am wondering if anyone else has had this happen.  I am a little worried about this as if I had not gone out to check this could have been quite bad. 

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Burnt wires
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2018, 02:20:14 am »
Hi Loopy,

Welcome to the forum. Sorry to welcome you under such circumstances. With this subject you should have started another thread.

There have been reports of fires inside the Bradleys. Usually it is caused by operator error, while cooking fatty meats; such as brisket and pork butts. Some of the most common causes are due to not changing and/or keeping the water bowl full. Covering the racks completely with foil, which can cause a excessive build up of heat. Covering the drip tray with foil, which also can cause of build up of excessive heat, and also grease. Another cause is not paying attention to the drip tray when changing the water bowl. During a long cook, buildup can occur on the drip tray. This will block the vents, and cause the same problem as covering it with foil. It is best to have a 2-inch metal scraper handy to clean the drip tray off during the cook; if buildup occurs. Any one or a combination of these can lead to fires.

In your case there could have been a fifth reason, your brisket may have been too large and touching the back wall. This will allow grease to flow onto the element, which will cause a fire.

I keep my smoker about 3 feet from any combustables, and always have an ABC fire extingusher nearby. There have been no reports of a fire escaping an unattended Bradley that had a fire, and had remained closed. So the smoker seems to contain the fire. However, there have been reports of the operator making the fire worse by panicing; such as opening the door and leaving it open. Or trying to improperly put out the fire.


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Offline zueth

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Re: Burnt wires
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2018, 04:54:41 pm »
Sounds like a grease fire, the same thing happened to my buddy when doing a large brisket. Have to be careful with those to make sure they don’t touch the walls like Habs mentions.


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