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Author Topic: Rib Roast  (Read 675 times)

Offline manfromplaid

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2019, 01:00:35 pm »
I think that will be a lot of salt.  I blend my salt/pepper/garlic 1/3-1/3-1/3  and add onion to your desired taste. it might be best to start with 1 cup of blended rub in case its to much and its easy to blend more if you need it.

Offline watchdog56

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2019, 01:04:49 pm »
good point.

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #17 on: May 16, 2019, 01:54:35 pm »
I have never measured exactly how much salt I use when I make my wet rub (garlic, and fresh herbs); but I would say I use 2 - 3 tablespoons of Diamond Crystal Kosher salt for a 9 lb. roast; probably closer to the high end of 2 tablespoons. Being a wet rub, I mix up what I need for that individual roast.  Diamond Crystal has large crystals, and 2 tablespoons of Diamond Crystal equals about 1 tablespoon of table salt, or 1.5 tablespoons of Morton Kosher salt.

Cook's Illustrated recommends 1 teaspoon of Diamond Crystal Kosher salt, per pound of boneless meat; wrap tightly and refrigerate overnight.



     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline watchdog56

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2019, 05:24:51 am »
Thanks everyone. Seeing how I have one roast at 7.50 and another at 6, I plan on using 4 Tbsp of both kosher salt and black pepper and 2Tbsp of both onion and garlic powder. I will use that mixture to cover both roasts.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 06:29:11 am by watchdog56 »

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #19 on: May 18, 2019, 01:53:39 am »
If the roasts are bone-in, and depending on what type of kosher salt; you may not want to use the whole mixture - because some of that weight is bone.

Just a note on how I do my bone-in rib roast. Prior to applying my seasonings I separate the rib bones from the meat, and season the meat on all sides. Using butcher's twine I tie the bones and meat back together. Then tightly wrap it and refrigerate it overnight. After cooking and before serving, I separate the rib bones and meat once more. I put the ribs back into the refrigerator, and flash reheat them on a grill of under the broiler the next day. Sometimes I will use a glaze. That's the chef's treat.  :)


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)