Bookmarks 2 Bookmarks

Author Topic: Smoked brisket  (Read 370 times)

Offline Northofthe49

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Smoked brisket
« on: June 06, 2019, 04:42:57 pm »
Hey guys and gals and smoke Masters

I am still fairly new to the smoking game I've done a few ribs chicken nothing exciting yet I think I'm ready to pop my brisket cherry only thing that concerns me is with the OSB I have the recovery for  temperature is worrying me. I'm just worried about the danger zone and bacteria spoiling the meat and the fact that recovery takes almost as long as the cooking time can anybody quash my fears or before I tackle advice like a brisket should I go for a upgrade to the element or what. I'd rather not give myself food poisoning especially on such an expensive piece of meat.

Sent from my CLT-L04 using Tapatalk


Offline Northofthe49

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Re: Smoked brisket
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2019, 04:59:35 pm »
Also if anyone has some fool proof recipes they would like to share that would be fantastic

Sent from my CLT-L04 using Tapatalk


Offline Ka Honu

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,961
  • Everyone is entitled to my opinion
Re: Smoked brisket
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2019, 09:00:22 pm »
Go to the forum's archived recipe site and drill down to the Beef section. Read everything Pachanga posted about brisket. Follow his guidance and your brisket will be as good as it gets.

For your first brisket, you might want to use a mix of salt, pepper, and garlic powder instead of a "fancy" rub - that way you'll see what the beef tastes like and adjust to your preference (if necessary) in later cooks. I pretty much stick with the SP&G and let the cow and the smoker do the rest.

Offline Habanero Smoker

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 14,621
  • KCBS - Master Certified Barbecue Judge
Re: Smoked brisket
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2019, 02:43:40 am »
The long times it takes briskets and butts to cook to doneness in the Bradley use to worry me when I first started out. Since you are working with solid muscle you usually only have to worry about bacteria on the surface of the meat. Smoke is an antimicrobial, as well as salt. These will retard the growth of bacteria on the surface of the meat, and provide some additional protection. There are studies that state if you inject meat, the needle may transfer bacteria from the surface to the interior of the meat, but most injections include salt.

Since I got a sous vide circulator I've been looking into pasteurization. Also when I found this recipe Cook A Turkey Overnight in your kitchen oven. Pasteurization is a measure of temperature, time, and the desired kill rate taken together. You can effectively kill bacteria at a lower temperatures by holding the food at the temperature for a certain amount of time. I'm trying to find out if any of those principles apply to low temperature cooking of meats in a smoker. Here is a article on the Amazing Ribs site; some of their articles fall short of science, but this one seems accurate; What You Need To Know....

I hope this takes away some concerns.


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)