Author Topic: What do you inject into briskets  (Read 332 times)

Offline Old Texan

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What do you inject into briskets
« on: March 25, 2021, 11:36:01 AM »
I've noticed several post concerning cooking briskets and several say something about injecting the brisket. What do you inject into it?

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: What do you inject into briskets
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2021, 02:01:21 PM »
When I do inject, it is when I smoke/cook my brisket hot and fast. I use my modified version of Melissa Clarkson's injection. This makes a lot, so you may want to reduce it by half or more. Most beef injections seem to make the brisket taste like roast beef, this injection doesn't; at least for me it doesn't

Beef Competition Injection (modified Melissa Cookston)
2 qts. Water (original recipe calls for 2 quarts of her beef stock recipe. If you use beef stock do not use the Penzy's Beef Soup Base)
2 Tbs. Penzy's Beef Soup Base and Seasoning is recommended (or similar beef soup base)
½ C. Worcestershire sauce
½ C. Ultimate BBQ Rub (That is her rub found in the book or internet, or use your favorite rub)
2 Tbs. Granulated garlic
2 tsp. Onion powder

I inject with the grain - only to reduce the sight of injection marks, and try to inject 10% of the weight of the brisket.

I season the brisket with my variation or Chris Hart's Dalmatian Rub.

Dalmatian Rub (variation of Chris Hart's rub)
1 C. Diamond kosher Salt
1 C. Coarsely ground black pepper
3 Tbs. Granulated garlic
1 Tbs. Chipotle powder or cayenne (I used Ancho powder - less heat and better flavor)

Mix all ingredients in a bowl. Store in an air right container.
NOTE: This is enough for at least four whole briskets. I made 1/4 of this recipe and had plenty left over. This also makes a good grilling seasoning for chicken parts, steaks and pork chops.


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline Old Texan

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Re: What do you inject into briskets
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2021, 02:19:35 PM »
Thank you!

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: What do you inject into briskets
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2021, 04:43:52 AM »
One other thing that Myron Mixon does in addition to injecting, is to make a full batch of the injection, then after injecting place brisket in a foil pan; flip the brisket fat side down, and pour the remaining injection over the brisket. Cover, place in refrigerator and marinate it for at least 6 hours; flipping it every couple of hours. I did this once, but didn't see any benefited from doing this.


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline Old Texan

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Re: What do you inject into briskets
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2021, 09:52:32 AM »
One more question, this one concerns the auber. Is it better to set on time or temperature for a 10 pound brisket?

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: What do you inject into briskets
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2021, 01:39:27 PM »
Time is generally a guideline for me. It is better to have the brisket finish early, then having family or guess waiting around. If the brisket finishes early you can always FTC it. With a 10 lb. brisket, you could probably use a microwave (with the power off) instead of a cooler.

Primarily I always go by temperature, but texture is what determines when the brisket is done. Each cut can cook a little differently, so for example a brisket could be ready from the temperatures of 190°F to 205°F; or so. Many will take their brisket out of the smoker when the meat probe slides in an out like a hot knife through butter. But you don't want to overcook it, or it will just fall apart when cut. Begin testing for tenderness around the 190°F mark.

Also if you wrap, generally most will wrap when the brisket hits an internal temperature of 160°F to 165°F or so. But some times the bark doesn't get firm enough at that point, so I will hold off on wrapping until the bark sets.


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)