Author Topic: Insulation for Homemade Smoker  (Read 15339 times)

robs

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Insulation for Homemade Smoker
« on: September 07, 2006, 07:01:53 PM »
Does anyone have any information on the types of insulation that can be used when building a homemade smoker? I'm assuming that it would have to be some kind of food grade foam.

rob

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Offline iceman

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Re: Insulation for Homemade Smoker
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2006, 10:07:09 AM »
Most of the poly/iso foams (like you see in refers and coolers) are only good up to 220F before they start to vapor on you. At 350F on up depending on the blow agent that was used while shooting the foam it will flash (burn up). The smoke from that will drop you in a heart beat. They do make higher temp foam but I don't think you'll find it at a retail level.
The fiberglass insulation such as Knauf, Owens Corning, or Johns Mansville used in ovens and warming cabinets will handle up to 1000F depending on the type. Knauf HTB and the Knauf high temp panel material are good to 850F constant and 1000F peaks.
Hobbs Bonded Fibers makes the Thermolite 300 Plus that's good up to 350F constant and 400F peaks.
Alpha Associates makes insulation blanket material under the trade name of Alpha Temp-Mat formerly called Kasko-Mat. It's easy to work with and is good up to 1200F.
The Alpha-Mat has a .50 "K" BTU/Inch?Hr.Ft2/F at 500F which is slightly higher then the HTB material.
There are many insulations on the market but most contain the same material in there respective classes.
When you insulate your smoker make sure there is no way for grease or moisture to get to the insulation. It will drop the R value to nothing and could catch fire if over heated.
Fiberglass or needled glass insulation needs to be slightly compressed to hold it in place or held in place with lacing anchors. It will some times settle between the walls of the smoker if it's banged around alot.
Some of the home insulation such as at Home Depot and Lowes will work just fine for a home built smoker. Make sure you wear a long sleeve shirt and safety glasses whe you work with it. If you get itchy afterwards take a COOL shower not hot. Hot water will open up your pores and the insulation will work it's way deeper and drive you nuts.
Hope this is some kind of help. :)

Offline winemakers

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Re: Insulation for Homemade Smoker
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2006, 11:07:22 AM »
wow, now thats a lot of insulation information!  Iceman, want to help me in my attic before winter?

 ;)

robs

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Re: Insulation for Homemade Smoker
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2006, 11:22:30 AM »
Most of the poly/iso foams (like you see in refers and coolers) are only good up to 220F before they start to vapor on you. At 350F on up depending on the blow agent that was used while shooting the foam it will flash (burn up). The smoke from that will drop you in a heart beat. They do make higher temp foam but I don't think you'll find it at a retail level.
The fiberglass insulation such as Knauf, Owens Corning, or Johns Mansville used in ovens and warming cabinets will handle up to 1000F depending on the type. Knauf HTB and the Knauf high temp panel material are good to 850F constant and 1000F peaks.
Hobbs Bonded Fibers makes the Thermolite 300 Plus that's good up to 350F constant and 400F peaks.
Alpha Associates makes insulation blanket material under the trade name of Alpha Temp-Mat formerly called Kasko-Mat. It's easy to work with and is good up to 1200F.
The Alpha-Mat has a .50 "K" BTU/Inch?Hr.Ft2/F at 500F which is slightly higher then the HTB material.
There are many insulations on the market but most contain the same material in there respective classes.
When you insulate your smoker make sure there is no way for grease or moisture to get to the insulation. It will drop the R value to nothing and could catch fire if over heated.
Fiberglass or needled glass insulation needs to be slightly compressed to hold it in place or held in place with lacing anchors. It will some times settle between the walls of the smoker if it's banged around alot.
Some of the home insulation such as at Home Depot and Lowes will work just fine for a home built smoker. Make sure you wear a long sleeve shirt and safety glasses whe you work with it. If you get itchy afterwards take a COOL shower not hot. Hot water will open up your pores and the insulation will work it's way deeper and drive you nuts.
Hope this is some kind of help. :)


Great report IceMan. Thanks for the information.

rob