Author Topic: Cold smoking times  (Read 4236 times)

Offline rauchteufel

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Cold smoking times
« on: November 03, 2006, 03:01:18 AM »
Hi, all! I'm new to this board and to smoking. I'm thinking of getting a Bradley Original Smoker, and I've been looking at posts on cold smoking, including the cardboard box and hose work-around. Before I decide finally, I've a question about times and costs of cold smoking.

It says on the UK Arden Smoker Supplies site:
"Although somewhat less than a bonfire, an impressive amount of smoke is produced from a single bisquette, and this high smoke density does obviously effect smoking times within the cabinet.  For example, it is unlikely that you would want to smoke salmon in the Bradley Smoker for more than say 6 hours, whereas in a traditional smokehouse with often quite low smoke density, the process may take a week! This is also good news from the point of view of bisquette consumption. At current prices smoking with the Bradley  Flavour Bisquettes costs less than 1 UK pound per hour."

My (little) reading on cold smoking in general suggests that cold smoking can take several days, depending of course on what you're trying to smoke. That would seem to involve quite an expenditure in bisquettes, if it took that time with the Bradley! The Arden site suggests that cold smoking with the Bradley is much quicker than using other kit, because of high smoke density. Is this the experience of you experts out there? Is a week really reduced to amaximum of 6 hours with the Bradley? Any advice you could offer here would be greatly appreciated.

Fizzog

Offline manxman

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,693
Re: Cold smoking times
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2006, 03:38:05 AM »
Hi Fizzog and welcome to the forum.

The most I have ever smoked anything is 8 hours, that was cold smoking some pollack and typically it is rare for anyone to go beyond 4-5 hours.

The John Watkins Coldsmoking method using the cardboard box and tumble dryer hose works very well, I have used it on numerous occasions for fish and cheese.

So what you quote from the Arden site is basically correct, have a look at the links below that will back this up and give you a few ideas.

The choice of the Original Bradley Smoker is a sensible one if you want to cold smoke, the digital model is not as flexible regarding cold smoking. (i think it only becomes available in the UK later this month in any case)

Hope this helps.  :)



http://susan.rminor.com/forums/showthread.php?t=103
http://susan.rminor.com/forums/showthread.php?t=139
http://susan.rminor.com/forums/showthread.php?t=215
Manxman

Offline rauchteufel

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Re: Cold smoking times
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2006, 04:17:47 AM »
Thanks, Manxman, that's really helpful, as are the links you offered. BTW, I emailed Bradley, and they confirmed that cold smoking by the John Atkins method is not really possible with the digital smokers, unlesss (somewhere there's a post which suggests this) you find a longer sensor cable than that supplied.

Fizzog

Offline coyote

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 889
Re: Cold smoking times
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2006, 07:21:02 PM »
Welcome aboard Fizzog, I'm sure you'll find just as I have ,there are a lot of good
folks here willing to help out.
                                                                        Coyote

Offline tsquared

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,144
Re: Cold smoking times
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2006, 09:37:11 PM »
Welcome Fizzog--Manxman has covered alot of what needs to be said re your query. One of the things to keep in mind when cold smoking salmon is that getting the proper firmness in your salmon is about proper curing procedure before the smoke and also removal of more moisture from the fish during the smoke. Moisture removal need not take place only while actual smoking is going on. I only apply smoke in my Bradley for 2 hours to cold smoked salmon but I leave the fish in the box with (relatively) warm air(up to 85 degrees)-moving past the fish for 1 or 2 days, depending on how the fish feels in terms of firmness. some people apply up to 4 hours actual smoke but i would err on the side of caution for your first batch and then add more time for your subsequent batches until you get the right amount of smoke for your palate. Let us know your procedure for your first smoke and how things turn out.
T2

Offline rauchteufel

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Re: Cold smoking times
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2006, 11:30:27 PM »
Thanks, one and all, for the great welcome, and thanks, tsquared, for the further advice. Getting the Original, I think, and I'll let you know how the first attempt goes...

Fizzog