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Author Topic: Another Mod...  (Read 36785 times)

Offline Mr Walleye

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #60 on: April 24, 2009, 07:23:18 am »
Mike just a question ? can i run the mod with just   the bradley gen ? i have a bs6. or do i have to use my pid .

OldSmoker

No, you would have to use the PID because the digital generator's wiring and control panel may not be able to handle the doubled electrical load of the two heating elements.

Mike
Oh yes you can. Hate to burst your bubble. But you can use the the Bradley to control any size heater. Just use the 110 volt output from the Bradley digital controler to operater a SSR with a 110 volt input. You can control any output amperage from the correct sized SSR you want and for under $50.00. If you want a SSR that will last a life time get an Allen-Bradley SSR. I believe they are the 700 series.


Here's a CRYDOM INC. SSR 40 amp. for $38.24     110v input/110 volt output 40 A.
http://www.galco.com/scripts/cgiip.exe/wa/wcat/itemdtl.r?listtype=Catalog&pnum=A1240-CRDM

Your absolutely right RoadKing... and no bubbles were burst.  ;)

I think his question was more geared towards running 2 heating elements using the digital generator to control it (without modification) or at least that's how I interpreted his question. He says he already has a PID so I would think he would just use it. The key point I was trying to make was, when doubling the draw of the heating elements, the digital generator's wiring and control panel may not be able to handle the load. Your point is taken that you could modify it by using the Bradley controls to control an SSR that could handle the higher draw.

Mike

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Offline Roadking

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #61 on: April 24, 2009, 10:24:15 am »
Mike just a question ? can i run the mod with just   the bradley gen ? i have a bs6. or do i have to use my pid .

OldSmoker

No, you would have to use the PID because the digital generator's wiring and control panel may not be able to handle the doubled electrical load of the two heating elements.

Mike
Oh yes you can. Hate to burst your bubble. But you can use the the Bradley to control any size heater. Just use the 110 volt output from the Bradley digital controler to operater a SSR with a 110 volt input. You can control any output amperage from the correct sized SSR you want and for under $50.00. If you want a SSR that will last a life time get an Allen-Bradley SSR. I believe they are the 700 series.


Here's a CRYDOM INC. SSR 40 amp. for $38.24     110v input/110 volt output 40 A.
http://www.galco.com/scripts/cgiip.exe/wa/wcat/itemdtl.r?listtype=Catalog&pnum=A1240-CRDM

Your absolutely right RoadKing... and no bubbles were burst.  ;)

I think his question was more geared towards running 2 heating elements using the digital generator to control it (without modification) or at least that's how I interpreted his question. He says he already has a PID so I would think he would just use it. The key point I was trying to make was, when doubling the draw of the heating elements, the digital generator's wiring and control panel may not be able to handle the load. Your point is taken that you could modify it by using the Bradley controls to control an SSR that could handle the higher draw.

Mike
I was under the impression he didn't know what way to go, thinking he didn't have a PID. If your going to modify the cabinet, why not just use what you have and just add the heaters and SSR.  I really think the best thing Bradley could do for the 6 rack is install a 1000w. heater They are probably the only company I know that doesn't. The thing that sold me on the Bradley was the low heat capabilties of it for smoking. As far as using it to roast a butt, brisket or ribs my "Cookshack" blows the Bradley away.

Offline oldsmoker

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #62 on: April 24, 2009, 03:35:18 pm »
thanks mike and road king.  going to do the mod and will be using my pid. just want extra heat for mrecovery. low and slow is the way to go when smoking.
OLDSMOKER

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #63 on: April 27, 2009, 02:34:10 pm »
Well I finally got this mod completed on my OBS. Finished up this morning. This is a very easy mod to do. Just be careful drilling the holes in the reflector so that you don't ruin it. The drill bit tends to tear the thin stainless steel instead of cutting it. Start with a small bit, gradually increase in size, and use a slow speed. I stopped at 3/8” and use my Dremel with a grinding wheel to make the hole large enough for the ends to fit.

With a lot of assistance from Mike, I was able to figure out the wiring and install an illuminated on/off switch to control the second element. The switch I used is the same switch Bradley uses for the OBS smoke generator.

If you intend to install the switch you needed 9 feet of wire, without the switch you will need 4.5 - 5 feet. I have tested it for three 5 minute intervals and will fully test it either this evening or tomorrow morning using my DigiQ II to control the temperatures.

For those who have the OBS, and want to install a switch; I'll post more photos later. Here are a couple of photos of the front of the smoker showing the location of the switch. When I get a chance I’ll post more pictures of how I installed the switch.

Click on photos to enlarge:
     


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline Mr Walleye

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #64 on: April 27, 2009, 02:41:53 pm »
Nicely done Habs!  8)

Mike

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NePaSmoKer

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #65 on: April 27, 2009, 05:49:18 pm »
Very nice Habs.

nepas

Offline Tenpoint5

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #66 on: April 27, 2009, 07:11:00 pm »
Looks Great Hab's like the switch has been there since you bought it. Now to do some smoking, since you knocked all the flavoring off the walls and door!! :D
Bacon is the Crack Cocaine of the Food World.

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Offline Smokin Soon

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #67 on: April 27, 2009, 08:29:09 pm »
Speaking of knocking all of the flavoring off the walls, Mine is shedding it's skin leaving shiny virgin stainless spots. Normal?  ???

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #68 on: April 28, 2009, 01:51:07 am »
Mike, NePas, 10.5; thanks

Here is how I installed the switch. I have to post this in two parts. I have exceeded the 600 character limit. Sorry I generally overly explain directions.


PART 1

Step #1

This shows the wiring that goes to the faceplate. This is an old photo that was taken when I had replaced my faceplate a few years back. To take the face plate off; first remove the three small screws on the top, and the three larger screws on the bottom. Note two of the bottom screws are located inside the feet that are a part of the faceplate. Make sure you mark down how the wiring is connected, and if you have a camera also take a picture for reference. Note: don’t set the faceplate out in the sun, it will warp.



Step #2
Here is a photo of the back of my OBS. The wire code is BLUE=hot; WHITE=neutral; and GREEN=ground.

  • Note that some of the foam insulation directly behind the heating element has melted. Sometime(s) during its 4 years and 8 months that I have had it, it must have overheated. I’m not too concerned, because there is extra insulation behind the element. It appears to be Mineral Wool insulation that has been installed under the foam. The Mineral Wool(?) is only installed directly behind the heating element.

Here is a second picture of the back with the new wiring. There is one extra wire attached to the blue (hot). That extra wire leads to the switch, if you don’t have a switch it goes directly to the element. Because I am adding a switch, there are two extra wires attached to the white (neutral). One wire goes to the element for the first element; the second wire goes to the second element, and the third goes to the switch to operate the bulb in the switch. Again the third wire is only needed if you are installing a switch. It may look like a mess, but I have marked the wires to indicate which is hot, which go to the elements, and which neutral is for the switch.




Step #3

This is the bottom of the cabinet where the wires will run to the switch located on the faceplate. The first photo shows the original wiring; the second photo shows the three additional wires for the switch. About three years ago the smoker took a dive of the stand. You can see some of the damage to the frame that occurred when the smoker dropped about four feet from its stand. There was also minor damage to the door.

     


Step #4
This picture shows the wiring coming out of the front. Four wires are for the original element, the other three are for the second element that will be controlled by a switch. Again, it looks like a mess, but I used a couple of sharpies to make distinct marks to identify with wire was hot, which went to the element, and which went to the neutral





     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #69 on: April 28, 2009, 01:57:17 am »
Part 2

Step #5

For the switch I decided to go with is a SPST Illuminated Rocker Switch. The switch is the same switch that Bradley uses for the generator on the OBS. It is rated at 15 amps 250VAC, and there is a bulb which lights to indicate it is in the “ON” position. The easiest place to obtain this switch is from Yard & Pool. They have a well stocked parts inventory, and fast service. Communicating with Mike, I learned that a 5 amp AC switch would be plenty. So if you choose to use another switch just make sure it is at least 5 amps.

First you need to determine which terminal controls what. The switch I have, the terminals were marked 1, 2, & 3, with no instructions. With Mikes assistance, he determined with terminal control what, how to test it with an Ohm meter, and how to test the swith without a load prior to installation.

Here is a diagram of the wiring.


For the switch I was installing, the hole size is approximately 1 1/8” x 3/8”. To cut the hole for the switch I first made a paper template. I located and area in the front that would have the most space for ventilation. I tried using different color markers, but I could not see the lines well. I also tried scribing the lines, but I had difficulty seeing those lines also (note to self; get new glasses). So I opted to use paint; which had its draw backs because the line edges were fuzzy. Well anyway, I got the area marked off good enough to cut the hole



Mounting the switch vertically does not give you too much room for error in placement; so be careful in placing the template. When the hole is cut to the final size, you will need at least an 1/8” lip both top and bottom. It is difficult to measure the location from the front, due to the shape and design of the faceplate. It may be helpful to judge the distance from the back of the faceplate. From the back of the faceplate drill a 1/16” hole at the location the top right corner of the template will be, and used that as a guide when you position the template on the front. 

The first photo is a picture looking at the hole from the inside. Look closely and you can see that there is space left at the top and bottom. To cut the hole I first drilled a 1/4” pilot hole and used a coping saw with a fine tooth blade. I made sure I stayed inside the lines, and then used a small file to file the hole to the correct size. You need to be careful not to make the hole too big, the switch should fit snug. The second photo shows the hole from the front. That white grid on the bottom of the faceplate is a template for drilling the ventilation holes.

     

Ventilation holes for switch:
The area covers 1 1/8 square inch, and the drill bit size is 1/8”



Step #6
I forgot to take pictures of the final wiring to the faceplate. Note: it is easier to hook up the switch if you run the wires through the hole you cut for the switch, and then connect the wires. Once the wires are connected install the switch with the wires hooked up.

The finished product:
First picture shows one element on, and the second shows two elements on. Though it is difficult to see, the third photo show the power indicator light, and the illuminated switch both lit up. This was after 3 and 5 minutes of operation.

          

Just a couple of other notes, as I mentioned in an earlier post be careful drilling the holes in the reflector. Don’t put the back of the smoker on until after you have installed the heating element. Leaving the back open make is easier to adjust the wire length. If you have trouble pushing the wire back in, you can easily pull it from the back. Measure twice and cut once.




     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #70 on: April 28, 2009, 01:59:27 am »
Speaking of knocking all of the flavoring off the walls, Mine is shedding it's skin leaving shiny virgin stainless spots. Normal?  ???

If it is flaking off in large pieces, that has happened to me in the past. I usually happens after I have smoked a lot of food that has a high moisture content.


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #71 on: April 28, 2009, 05:30:27 am »
I did a preliminary test this morning to see how long it would take to preheat the smoker. I'm impressed. The second element really shortens the time. Here are the results

Weather conditions – sunny, 74°F, wind steady 5 – 10 mph, gusting to 20 mph. Smoker set in the shade; unprotected from the wind. Starting cabinet temperature 68°F.

8:00 AM     68°F
8:05 AM     97°F
8:10 AM    172°F
8:15 AM    228°F
8:17 AM    250°F

At 8:15 the temperature was rising about 1°F every 6 - 8 seconds and was showing no signs of slowing down.

I’m going to run the same test tomorrow with just using one element on full power.


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline Tenpoint5

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #72 on: April 28, 2009, 05:44:22 am »
Outstanding write up there Habs!! Even the electrically challenged like myself could probably do a Mod like this. I'm hoping this will end up in the recipe section for future reference.
Bacon is the Crack Cocaine of the Food World.

Be careful about calling yourself and EXPERT! An ex is a has-been, and a spurt is a drip under pressure!


Offline smokeitall

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #73 on: April 28, 2009, 07:44:04 am »
Speaking of knocking all of the flavoring off the walls, Mine is shedding it's skin leaving shiny virgin stainless spots. Normal?  ???

If it is flaking off in large pieces, that has happened to me in the past. I usually happens after I have smoked a lot of food that has a high moisture content.

Mine just did the same thing a couple of smokes ago, its almost like paint peeling.  I took my air hose my compressor and blew out all the loose pieces.

Offline smokeitall

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Re: Another Mod...
« Reply #74 on: April 28, 2009, 07:54:19 am »
Habs, that is a great write up, after I am done with my big boy bradley I am sure I will need something to tinker with and this looks like a good next project.  Thanks for the write up, it looks pretty easy with your directions, and relatively low cost.

I'm with 10.5 it would be nice to see this on the recipe site.