Author Topic: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes  (Read 10192 times)

Offline Gizmo

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,922
Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« on: January 03, 2009, 11:30:51 pm »
Well not to rip off a title of a book, but to introduce some information from a truly great author and a KCBS (Kansas City Barbeque Society) Judge.  I have had the opportunity to talk to the author of "Marinades, Rubs, Brines, Cures & Glazes", Jim Tarantino.  He has been quite gracious to me over the last few weeks and has exchanged a few emails.  I was given his book for Christmas a couple of years ago and have enjoyed the wealth of knowledge and inspiration from that book as well as others.  I believe Jim will be joining us here on the forum in a week or so and hope you all will benefit from his wisdom and experience as well.

Here are a couple of introductory answers Jim gave me on a recent email:

What is your favorite recipe in the book?

Jim:
Any of the glazes especially the Maple Bourbon.
Shaslick (pg 268)


Shaslick is a Morroccan Lamb kabob
 

What is your favorite for smoking recipe in the book if it is not your favorite overall? 
Jim:
Maple Turkey Jerky. It has a cult following.


That recipe is on page 117 with references to other pages for the various other components.

Jim does not own a Bradley, but does like to do his share of smoking.  Here is a link to one of his modified toys:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=82302&view=findpost&p=1420723


My son-in-law was the first to whip up one of Jim's recipes.  It was the Cajun rub and he asked me to use it on some some back ribs.  Yummy.

I have used it on several other dishes as well including recently on a Tri-Tip but I added some celery salt and Worcestershire powder as well.
Click here for our time proven and tested recipes - http://www.susanminor.org/

Offline Habanero Smoker

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 15,258
  • KCBS - Master Certified Barbecue Judge
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2009, 01:07:37 am »
Thanks for sharing.

I'm glad you posted that link. I was planning on getting the Caldera Del Fuego , because I thought the The Caldera Tall Boy only broke down into two parts. After viewing the link, now I have to make a few more decisions.


     I
         don't
                   inhale.
  ::)

Offline pensrock

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 5,447
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2009, 05:34:47 am »
Quote
Maple Turkey Jerky

Now that sound good!  :)

Offline Smoking Duck

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,836
    • La Cosa Smokestra Blog
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2009, 06:44:30 am »
That is awesome, Giz!  Thanks for steering him in our direction!  I know there's a ton of stuff still yet to learn on the subjects of rubs, marinades, etc!

Marc

Steeler....she's a keeper!

Who doesn't love lab puppies?


Click here for my blog: La Cosa Smokestra

Offline Mr Walleye

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 5,336
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2009, 08:14:05 am »
Thanks Giz! I'll have to have a look for his book.

Jim would be a very welcome member of the forum.

Mike

Click On The Smoker For Our Time Tested And Proven Recipes


Offline tsquared

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,144
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2009, 06:28:17 pm »
I've enjoyed using the recipes from one of his book for years. Some of the recipes I've posted and Olds has put on his recipe site are Jim's (I did give him credit on my original post)--the Plum Cassis marinade for pork loin is one that comes to mind. It will be VERY cool to have him as  a member. WTG Giz!
T2

Offline Gizmo

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,922
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2009, 09:34:24 pm »
Thanks Giz! I'll have to have a look for his book.

Jim would be a very welcome member of the forum.

Mike

You can get the book at Amazon for just $13.57

I am sure Jim would be happy to autograph one for you and send it to you.  I had him sign a few books and send them to me, the book price is $19.95 and he must get a great deal on shipping as the 5 cost me around $5, which was great.


 
« Last Edit: January 04, 2009, 09:37:14 pm by Gizmo »
Click here for our time proven and tested recipes - http://www.susanminor.org/

Offline Tenpoint5

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 11,847
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2009, 06:55:33 am »
Thanks Giz! I'll have to have a look for his book.

Jim would be a very welcome member of the forum.

Mike

You can get the book at Amazon for just $13.57

I am sure Jim would be happy to autograph one for you and send it to you.  I had him sign a few books and send them to me, the book price is $19.95 and he must get a great deal on shipping as the 5 cost me around $5, which was great.
 

Looks like another book to put in the stables.
Bacon is the Crack Cocaine of the Food World.

Be careful about calling yourself and EXPERT! An ex is a has-been, and a spurt is a drip under pressure!

NePaSmoKer

  • Guest
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2009, 07:57:43 am »
This book is really good.


nepas

Offline marinade

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 6
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2009, 05:41:19 am »
Hi Gang,

Thanks for the nice words and thank you Rick for the inaugural posting. Happy to hang with y’all.  Truly a cool site. A lot of what you folks are playing with transcends individual rigs and applies across the boards or should I say grates. Some of the stuff I‘m still messing with is using “smoke” as a condiment. When I want some smoke on the plate but not necessarily on the protein I add some Smoked Pepper Powder (smoked red bell pepper, dried in a dehydrator and ground) to some citrus zest for a savory dust. I distinguish dust from a rub because I use it after some things been cooked as opposed to prior. BTW, it’s the same principal of adding chipotle powder or pimeton'. I use it when I want to add the flavor of smoke but not necessarily the process.

Are any of y’all doing other types of condiment enhancements?

Jim

Offline Smoking Duck

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,836
    • La Cosa Smokestra Blog
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2009, 07:33:40 am »
Hey Jim,

I proudly display an autographed copy of your book in my kitchen (courtesy of my good friend, Gizmo).  I really like the book.  Some absolutely amazing things in there.  I too will do what you do with the peppers (been doing it with salt for some time now).  There's a couple of guys/gals on here that do the spice thing.  I recently did a run with smoked jalapenos (chipotle) and habaneros.  Hard to notice the smoke flavoring with all of the heat accompanied with those, but a discerning palate can pick it up, IMO.  I'll probably start doing it with peppercorns here soon as well. 

I've been working on an apple rub lately (having a hard time getting the apple ground down; think it's my burr grinder) and toyed with trying to smoke some apples to use as a condiment to introduce a sweet/smoky flavor to either a poultry or pork or even vegetable dish.

I'd really like to hear your thoughts on doing more of the condiment enhancements.

Marc

Steeler....she's a keeper!

Who doesn't love lab puppies?


Click here for my blog: La Cosa Smokestra

Offline Mr Walleye

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 5,336
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2009, 08:00:58 am »
Hi Jim and welcome to the forum.

I have your book on order and it should be arriving any day now. I'm really looking forward to reading it and also following your contributions to this wonderful forum.

Thanks again for joining us!  8)

Mike

Click On The Smoker For Our Time Tested And Proven Recipes


Offline marinade

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 6
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2009, 10:40:49 am »
Hey Jim,

I proudly display an autographed copy of your book in my kitchen (courtesy of my good friend, Gizmo).  I really like the book.  Some absolutely amazing things in there.  I too will do what you do with the peppers (been doing it with salt for some time now).  There's a couple of guys/gals on here that do the spice thing.  I recently did a run with smoked jalapenos (chipotle) and habaneros.  Hard to notice the smoke flavoring with all of the heat accompanied with those, but a discerning palate can pick it up, IMO.  I'll probably start doing it with peppercorns here soon as well. 

I've been working on an apple rub lately (having a hard time getting the apple ground down; think it's my burr grinder) and toyed with trying to smoke some apples to use as a condiment to introduce a sweet/smoky flavor to either a poultry or pork or even vegetable dish.

I'd really like to hear your thoughts on doing more of the condiment enhancements.

Marc

Hi Marc,

Try messing with this (new, not in the book). I've use the Rem on Po'Boys. Pure sandwich enhancement. Now you can also mess with a smoked aioli substituting smoked garlic for half the garlic portion. You do need to add fresh garlic to maintain it's balence and bite. Added some grated lemon or orange zest for smoke balence.I had a conversation with Diane Kennedy and she told me that chipolte is both a smoking and drying (dehyrating) process and they're smoked for 3-5 days over oak. Same with Pimenton'. It's a long slow smoke. Unless the chiles are in your cookers for a few days it's tough to get that same effect or get them that brittle. When I'm smoking and dehydrating red bell peppers they have a dry licourice consistancy. Then there's my grinder.
The grinder I'm using is a Girmi mincer/chopper/grinders which has an 8-oz capacity and is 550 watts.

http://www.ikitchen.com/gitrch.html

This beast can take a beating. It really does the job. I may go at the apples to do a smoked apple dust. Would be killah on pork.

Smoked Red Pepper Romulade
Makes 2 cups

1 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons whole grain mustard
2 tablespoons ketchup
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup finely chopped scallions
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh flat leaf parsley
1/2 cup smoked red bell pepper or roasted red pepper, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

Combine the mayonnaise, mustard, ketchup, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, scallions, parsley, red bell pepper, garlic, pepper in a food processor and process until all the ingredients are blended. Stored in a clean airtight jar, this will keep in the refrigerator for 1 week.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2009, 10:43:44 am by marinade »

Offline Smoking Duck

  • Member Extraordinaire
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,836
    • La Cosa Smokestra Blog
Re: Marinades Rubs Brines Cures and Glazes
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2009, 10:59:26 am »
Jim,

Thanks for the recipe.  It's now in my super top secret recipes (If my wife figures out how to do this stuff, there's no real need for her to keep me around  ;D).

I usually will smoke in the Bradley for 3-5 hours and then throw the peppers or apples in a dehydrator to finish off the job.  I've got about 30 heads of garlic and going to do the same with them soon.  I'll probably smoke with hickory for 3-5 hours in the bradley (in a cold smoke at about 40F).  I'll then throw in the dehydrator for what will probably take 2-3 days to dry out and then grind into smoked garlic granules.  I'm looking forward to seeing how it comes out.  There are some things I'd like to learn how to dehydrate (such as red wine) to use in a dusting technique like you do.  If you try the apples, let me know how they come out.  I'd be interested in hearing how they worked for you.  I can get the apples to little chunk stage but have a real hard time getting it into a granule size like I'd like.  Perhaps it's a matter of slicing thinner at the beginning.  I use a mandolin slicer at 1/8" but have the capabilities of doing it at 1/16" and maybe that's the key.  Also, I only use apples that are recommended for cooking, otherwise, I find the sugar breaks down too quickly and the apples loose too much flavor along the way.

Thanks for the link on the grinder.  I'll have to talk the wife into it.

Marc 

Steeler....she's a keeper!

Who doesn't love lab puppies?


Click here for my blog: La Cosa Smokestra

Offline HCT

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,418
  • Got Labs???
    • Could This Be Magic
"The universe is a big place
probably the biggest"