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Non-Smoked Recipes / Re: Sweet Bread Starter
« Last post by mustangmoe on January 24, 2023, 01:42:03 pm »
Still going stong

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I have a Thermoworks Smoke and I've checked it with a pot of boiling water and a glass of ice water.  It is very accurate, based on those tests.

Testing Thermometers For Accuracy: Ice Bath Test & Boiling Water Test
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I have the same set up as manfromplaid and live in Winnipeg. I go by the temperature on my PID over the temperature on the Bradley digital screen. I've also used my Inkbird Wiresless Thermometer as a second temperature device to verify which was more accurate and the PID and Inkbird were very very close, while the Bradley temperature could be out by 20°F+ compared to them. So I'd say your Thermoworks is closer to actual temperature.
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The Digital Smokers (BTDS76P & BTDS108P) / Re: Door replacement
« Last post by Demoratics on January 10, 2023, 04:17:56 am »
It's great that you're planning to replace the door on your 6 rack digital oven! Changing the door on an oven can be a tricky process, so it's important to follow the proper steps to ensure that you don't damage any other parts of the oven in the process.

    1. First, consult the user manual for your oven to find the instructions on how to remove and replace the door. This will be specific for your oven make and model, follow the instructions carefully.

    2. Make sure to turn off the power to your oven and disconnect it from the power source before beginning the process.

    3. Remove any screws or bolts that are holding the door in place. This will likely involve removing the handle and the hinges. Be careful not to damage any of these parts while you're working.

    4. Carefully remove the old door from the oven. You may need to wiggle it a bit to get it out, but take care not to scratch or damage the oven frame in the process.

    5. Make sure to clean all the parts and the frame of the oven before installing the new door. Take a close look at all the seals and gaskets, and make sure they are in good condition and clean.

    6. Gently place the new door into the oven frame, making sure to align it correctly. Replace the hinges and screws, and reattach the handle.

    7. Before you turn the oven back on, you want to check the seal of the door and make sure that it is tight and sealed properly.

    8. Finally, consult your user manual again and go through the startup process or locksmith in barbican, the door should work properly once the oven is powered back on.
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I fully agree with manfromplaid.

In addition, I have the Signal, and it is extremely accurate measuring the ambient temperature around the probe. A couple of things to consider in placing your probe. Make sure you use the air (ambient) temperature probe, when measuring the cabinet temperature. That is the short blunt probe. Thermoworks states that the air probe is more accurate than the meat probes; for this measurement.

The placement of your probe is also important. Lowering the probe so that it hangs in the middle of the cabinet, may not give you the most accurate reading. I always attach my probe to the lowest tray - farthest away from the element, and keeping the probe at least a couple of inches from the meat. When food is cooking, it releases moisture through evaporation. Evaporation can cool down the area around the meat by as much as 20°F. Or in your case, above the meat, as the moisture moves up and out of the vent.

How did your ribs turn out?
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Thanks for the feedback!  I did ribs today in about -2C ambient temp.  The Signal read about 210, whereas the t-stat was about 30 degrees higher.  The ribs turned out well, I didn't bother with the wrapping or spritzing as I wanted to minimize opening the door.  I put an old blanket around the smoker as well to try to hold the heat in.
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j have the digital smoker with dual element mod. I found the smoker temp gauge off by quite a large margin. with the dual mod I use a PID to control temps.. I would go by the signal temps over the Bradley temps and leave the door closed. iam just outside Edmonton and know what its like to keep temps up in cooler weather. use your signal to develop a comparison to the built in gauge. best of luck trial and error and keep a log or journal.
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The Digital Smokers (BTDS76P & BTDS108P) / How accurate is the Bradley Thermostat?
« Last post by waynerto on January 08, 2023, 02:11:25 pm »
The reading on my thermostat seems to be consistently higher than what my Thermoworks Signals reports.  I guess this could be due to proximity to the heating element, but which should I believe?  I have the probe for my Signals hanging through the smoke hole to roughly the centre of the smoking cabinet.

For example, my Signals reports 206 and the Bradley control unit reads 241.  It is cold here today but I haven't opened the door in a couple of hours.
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Sausage Making / Re: New to sausage making
« Last post by lauragorf on January 04, 2023, 11:55:48 pm »
Poultry can be used to make snack sticks, but there are a few differences to keep in mind compared to using red meat. First and foremost, it's important to note that poultry has a lower fat content than red meat, which can affect the texture and flavor of the finished product. Poultry snack sticks may be slightly leaner and less tender than those made with red meat.

In terms of processing, the general steps for making poultry snack sticks are similar to those for making red meat snack sticks or almond chicken. You will need to grind the poultry, mix in the desired seasonings and curing agents (such as #1 cure), and stuff the mixture into casings. It's important to follow the manufacturer's instructions for any curing agents or seasonings, as the recommended amounts may vary depending on the product.

When it comes to final internal temperatures, it's important to cook poultry snack sticks to a safe temperature to ensure that any harmful bacteria are killed. The USDA recommends cooking all poultry to an internal temperature of 165°F (74°C). Be sure to use a food thermometer to accurately check the internal temperature of the snack sticks before serving.
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Sausage Making / Re: Turkey/ chicken snack sticks
« Last post by lauragorf on January 04, 2023, 05:46:35 am »
Poultry can be used to make snack sticks, but there are a few differences to keep in mind compared to using red meat. First and foremost, it's important to note that poultry has a lower fat content than red meat, which can affect the texture and flavor of the finished product. Poultry snack sticks may be slightly leaner and less tender than those made with red meat.

In terms of processing, the general steps for making poultry snack sticks are similar to those for making red meat snack sticks. You will need to grind the poultry, mix in the desired seasonings and curing agents (such as #1 cure), and stuff the mixture into casings. It's important to follow the manufacturer's instructions for any curing agents or seasonings, as the recommended amounts may vary depending on the product.

When it comes to final internal temperatures, it's important to cook poultry snack sticks to a safe temperature to ensure that any harmful bacteria are killed. The USDA recommends cooking all poultry to an internal temperature of 165°F (74°C). Be sure to use a food thermometer to accurately check the internal temperature of the snack sticks before serving.
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