Author Topic: Why turn fish during glazing and post-glazing?  (Read 2225 times)

Offline chiroken

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Why turn fish during glazing and post-glazing?
« on: July 22, 2010, 12:56:08 pm »
I've got my fish on the racks to glaze, Kummok's notes say to turn the fish 2-3 times to ensure more complete glazing. Why is this necessary when the  fish is already exposed on all surfaces? Is it just for the areas that are touching the actual wires on the bottom surface? The fish will be on the racks in a cool room downstairs for about 6+ hours before I'll be home from work so I don't know if I should bother after this length of time?

I'm not smoking until tomorrow morning so should I leave the fish on the racks in the cool room or should I stack them on each other overnight in the fridge? Considering the fish has brined (Kummok style) already, it isn't at risk of spoiling overnight in a room that is probably in the mid 60's is it?

Can't wait until tomorrow night for the first samples.....to para-phrase from Homer Simpson - "mmmmmmmm.....candied salmon"
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Offline Roadking

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Re: Why turn fish during glazing and post-glazing?
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2010, 04:53:26 pm »
I used to do filets with skin on and the skin was on the rack. Never turn them. Guess for a pretty look you would turn them if no skin but for myself why bother.

Offline chiroken

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Re: Why turn fish during glazing and post-glazing?
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2010, 05:05:16 pm »
I skinned a couple of the fish and then quite. Too much hassle! I'm used to leaving trout as whole sides to smoke so I fumbled my way through skinning 4 fillets and then gave up. Will take some practice. Most of my pieces of fish are not skin down as the meat is so thick I have to lay it on its side. I guess with the larger salmon I could cut horizontally to thin the fish out, leaving 1/2 with skin, 1/2 without.
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away.

The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

Offline Kummok

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Re: Why turn fish during glazing and post-glazing?
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2010, 08:49:45 pm »
Strictly personal preference, Chiroken. I tend to be a perfectionist about my salmon and how it ends up....that's why the skin & bones go away during processing. I've done enough skinning that it is no hassle at all to me...pulling pinbones is another story...it's a little "hassle-y".... but I do it anyway because I don't like bones in my finished product. Again, that's just me.

As far as turning the meat during the pellicle stage, just remember what I said above about my being a perfectionist.....I believe it to give a better all around look and texture by rotating the bottom to the top for better air circulation (I normally use a fan)

That's the great thing about smoked salmon....you don't have to be a perfectionist to get good, tasty results!

Offline chiroken

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Re: Why turn fish during glazing and post-glazing?
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2010, 10:33:10 pm »
I like the idea of skinning, probably need someone to show me how to do it properly. I did pull all the pin bones out. It's worth the effort to not have the pain later of watching my wife mush the fish 1st looking for bones! The store bought candied salmon around here is already in chunks, no skin, I do want to end up with that I believe. Doesn't work (having smaller pieces) with my standard racks, may invest one day in the grates with smaller holes so many here suggest (would help some with my jerky too). With this only my 3rd use of my Bradley (1st with fish) and all is going well so far.

8 hrs of glazing and the fish is darkening up but still damp to the touch. Hope I'm still within normal progression. Just put a fan about 6 feet away and will let it run overnight.

Hope it's good to go 1st thing in the morning. As my pieces are thick the plan is to smoke with maple for 2 hours @ 120^, 4 hrs at 140^ then 175^ until done, looking for white "boogers" as you (Kummok) so eloquintly put. I don't remember reading what setting to have the vent? Fully open?
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away.

The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.