Author Topic: 1st meal...ribs  (Read 4112 times)

Offline Namylevets

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1st meal...ribs
« on: January 01, 2016, 11:59:33 am »
Attempting to smoke 2 racks using the 321 method.  34 degrees here today so only able to get temp to 190 degrees.  Adding time to each step so hoping they come out ok.

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Offline Namylevets

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2016, 01:04:50 pm »
After wrapping in foil the temp rose to 220F.  Hmmmm?

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Offline tskeeter

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2016, 09:47:45 pm »
How wide open was your vent?  If the moisture released by what you are smoking can't get out of the smoker,it tends to hold the temp down.  When you foiled the ribs, you stopped the moisture from being released into the smoker cabinet, which would allow the temp to come up some.  Experienced users recommend the vent be at least 1/2 to 3/4 open.  At least at the beginning of the smoke when the most of the moisture is being released.  Note that several of us have removed the vent damper, so our vent is all the way open all of the time.

A second possibility is that as food cooks and the temperature of the meat increases, the cabinet temp tends to increase, too.

I also use boiling water in my puck bowl.  This means that the BTUs put out by the smoker go to cooking the meat instead of heating up water (which absorbs a whole bunch of BTUs).

Another helpful temp management technique is to install a heat sink in your smoker.  I keep a foil wrapped brick tucked under puck burner assembly.  Absorbs heat during preheat for later release to the meat you put into the smoker.  Also helps to stabilize temp when you open the door to check things.  Avoid opening the door any more than necessary.  If you're lookin, you ain't cookin.

Offline Namylevets

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2016, 08:39:56 am »
Vent was wide open the whole time.  I read this a few times here so it wasn't that.  I did have 2 racks (4 halves) so there was a lot of moisture im sure.  I will try the brick and hot water next time. 
They came out great...just took a little longer than 7 hours.  Almost 8.

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Offline Jim O

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2016, 08:46:46 am »
The final results is what counts. They look great !
- smoking
 -boating
- motorcycling
- how do I find time to sleep !

Offline Namylevets

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2016, 11:55:57 am »
Thanks...they didn't quite fall off the bone but they tasted fantastic.  I'm sure once i figure out the temp issue i will have them perfected.

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Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2016, 12:59:03 pm »
Glad to see your ribs were a success.

If the meat or other food is very close to the temperature probe or sensor, evaporation from the meat can cause a low reading. Evaporation can bring the air temperature near the meat (food) as much as 40°F lower than the actual cabinet temperature. Purchase a digital probe thermometer, and measure the cabinet temperature at the bottom rack; making sure no juices drip on the probe.

Most likely by foiling the meat, the evaporation was contained within the foil, and the food would have to be much closer (very close) to the probe or sensor, for it to have much of an effect on the temperature reading.


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Offline Namylevets

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2016, 05:52:39 pm »
Glad to see your ribs were a success.

If the meat or other food is very close to the temperature probe or sensor, evaporation from the meat can cause a low reading. Evaporation can bring the air temperature near the meat (food) as much as 40°F lower than the actual cabinet temperature. Purchase a digital probe thermometer, and measure the cabinet temperature at the bottom rack; making sure no juices drip on the probe.

Most likely by foiling the meat, the evaporation was contained within the foil, and the food would have to be much closer (very close) to the probe or sensor, for it to have much of an effect on the temperature reading.
The bottom rack seemed to cook better that the others.  Are you saying the temp readout is incorrect or if meat is too close it actually reduces the oven temp?

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Offline Habanero Smoker

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2016, 01:40:18 am »
It causes both, but if you have your probe too close to the meat you will get an incorrect cabinet (oven) reading. If the probe is too close to the meat your readout will be incorrect, since evaporation creates a cooling effect near the surface of the meat. For example, the cabinet temperature can be 220°F, but if your probe is too close to the food source, the air very close to the food source can be as much as 40°F lower than the actual air temperature.

An example of the effects of evaporation, take a probe and insert it into a bottle of isopropyl alcohol. Or if you have alcohol swabs, wipe the tip of the probe. A Thermopen works best for this test. Note the temperature of the probe, if it is in the alcohol, it should be room temperature, or if using a swab the reading should be room temperature prior to wiping it with the swab. Remove the probe from the bottle or swipe the probe if using a swab, and note the temperature change as the alcohol evaporates from the probe.

The bottom rack, and foods near the back of the smoker cook faster, that is why many of use recommend rotating the racks 180°, and from top to bottom.


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Offline Spliner

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Re: 1st meal...ribs
« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2016, 02:07:43 pm »
For spareribs.. try this next time you do a winter smoke.  Put a brick in the bottom (wrap it in foil) next to the water pan and pre-heat on full blast for about an hour (maybe less but just depends on the temp outside).  Keep the vent fully open.  Be quick about it when you put in the ribs.  Then, smoke your ribs for 3 hours in the Bradley, then shut it off and take them inside, wrap in foil and pour about 1/4 cup apple juice or beer in each foil pouch and put them in the oven for 1.5 hours to 2 hours.  Take them out once that time is up, and sauce them, put them on a gas grill or broil to bake in the sauce. Careful when you take them out of the foil, they'll usually be so tender they'll want to fall apart at this point.  If it's pork ribs (spare ribs, baby backs) then go for the 1.5 hours in the foil as a general rule, if it's beef ribs, go for up to 2 hours because they are generally thicker.

When you open the foil pouches, save some of the liquid in the bottom (leftover beer/apple juice) and mix it with your favorite sauce, then mop it back on the ribs.  It doesn't get much better!

We do what we have to for good BBQ in the winter!!  ;)  Bricks, crutches (foil pouches), homemade smoke shacks (to keep the wind away).  Looks really good!